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Dallas Baptist University
Dallas
Dallas
Baptist
Baptist
University
University
(DBU), formerly known as Dallas
Dallas
Baptist College, is a Christian
Christian
liberal arts university located in Dallas, Texas. The main campus is located approximately 12 miles (19 km) southwest of downtown Dallas
Dallas
overlooking Mountain Creek Lake. Founded in 1898 as Decatur Baptist
Baptist
College, Dallas
Dallas
Baptist
Baptist
University currently operates campuses in Dallas, Plano, and Hurst.Contents1 History 2 Growth and expansion 3 Academics3.1 Academic divisions 3.2 University
University
Honors Program 3.3 Accreditations 3.4 Rankings and recognition4 Life on campus4.1 Residence & apartment life 4.2 Student Life5 Traditions5.1 Cross Ring 5.2 Mr
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Private School
Private schools, also known to many as independent schools, non-governmental, privately funded, or nonstate schools,[1] are not administered by local, state or national governments; parents of kids who attend private schools choose to have their child be in a school where kids are accordingly selected based on either their family income, religious background, or simply based on their academics. Private schools retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition, rather than relying on mandatory taxation through public (government) funding; at some private schools students may be able to get a scholarship, lowering this tuition fee, dependent on a student's talents or abilities (e.g. sport scholarship, art scholarship, academic scholarship), need for financial aid, or tax credit scholarships that might be available
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Carrollton, Texas
Carrollton is a city in Denton, Dallas, and Collin counties in Texas, United States.[3] As of the 2010 census, its population was 119,097, making it the twenty-third most populous city in Texas.[4]Contents1 History 2 Geography2.1 Climate3 Demographics 4 Economy 5 Government5.1 Local government6 Education 7 Notable people 8 Sister cities 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The area was first settled by Jared Ford in 1842 by William and Mary Larner on a site within the Peters Colony grant. In 1844, the A. W. Perry family claimed land in the area around Trinity Mills where, in partnership with Wade H
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Junior College
A junior college is a post-secondary educational institution designed to prepare students for either skilled trades or for additional education at another college with more advanced academic material. Students typically attend junior colleges for 1-3 years.Contents1 Junior college by country1.1 India 1.2 Japan 1.3 Singapore 1.4 South Korea 1.5 United States1.5.1 Cultural connotations 1.5.2 Athletics 1.5.3 Military junior college2 See also 3 References 4 External links Junior college by country[edit] India[edit] In India, most states provide schooling through 12th grade. Telangana, Maharashtra, Odisha, Assam, Karnataka
Karnataka
and Andhra Pradesh, however, have a system of junior colleges where, after taking the 10th grade board exams (see SSLC, SSC), students have to apply to junior colleges to complete their 11th and 12th grades
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Independence Hall
Independence Hall
Independence Hall
is the building where both the United States Declaration of Independence and the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
were debated and adopted. It is now the centerpiece of the Independence National Historical Park in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The building was completed in 1753 as the colonial legislature (later Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
State House) for the Province of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and was used in that capacity until the state capital moved to Lancaster in 1799
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Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
(/ˌfɪləˈdɛlfiə/) is the largest city in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
and the sixth-most populous city in the United States, with an estimated population of 1,567,872[7] and more than 6 million in the seventh-largest metropolitan statistical area, as of 2016[update].[5] Philadelphia
Philadelphia
is the economic and cultural anchor of the Delaware
Delaware
Valley, located along the lower Delaware
Delaware
and Schuylkill Rivers, within the Northeast megalopolis
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Georgian Architecture
Georgian architecture
Georgian architecture
is the name given in most English-speaking countries to the set of architectural styles current between 1714 and 1830. It is eponymous for the first four British monarchs of the House of Hanover—George I, George II, George III, and George IV—who reigned in continuous succession from August 1714 to June 1830. The style was revived in the late 19th century in the United States as Colonial Revival architecture
Colonial Revival architecture
and in the early 20th century in Great Britain as Neo-Georgian architecture; in both it is also called Georgian Revival architecture
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First Baptist Church In America
The First Baptist Church in America is the First Baptist Church of Providence, Rhode Island, also known as the First Baptist Meetinghouse. It is the oldest Baptist church congregation in the United States, founded by Roger Williams in Providence, Rhode Island in 1638. The present church building was erected in 1774–75 and held its first meetings in May 1775
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Providence, Rhode Island
Providence is the capital and most populous city of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Rhode Island
Rhode Island
and is one of the oldest cities in the United States.[6] It was founded in 1636 by Roger Williams, a Reformed Baptist theologian and religious exile from the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony. He named the area in honor of "God's merciful Providence" which he believed was responsible for revealing such a haven for him and his followers to settle
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Congress Hall
Congress Hall, located in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
at the intersection of Chestnut and 6th Streets, served as the seat of the United States Congress
United States Congress
from December 6, 1790 to May 14, 1800.[2][3] During Congress Hall's duration as the capitol of the United States, the country admitted three new states, Vermont, Kentucky, and Tennessee; ratified the Bill of Rights of the United States Constitution; and oversaw the Presidential inaugurations of both George Washington
George Washington
(his second) and John Adams. Congress Hall
Congress Hall
was restored in the 20th century to its original appearance in 1796. The building is now managed by the National Park Service within the Independence National Historical Park
Independence National Historical Park
and is open for public tours
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Frisco, Texas
Frisco is a city in Collin and Denton counties in Texas. It is part of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, and is approximately 25 miles (40 km) from both Dallas Love Field
Dallas Love Field
and Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. The city population was 116,989 at the 2010 census.[2] As of March 1, 2018, the city had an estimated population of 173,884.[3] Frisco was the fastest-growing city in the United States
United States
in 2009,[4] and also the fastest-growing city in the nation from 2000 to 2009. In the late 1990s, the northern Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex
Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex
suburban development tide hit the northern border of Plano and spilled into Frisco, sparking explosive growth into the 2000s
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Hurst, Texas
Hurst is a city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Texas
Texas
located in the densely populated portion of northeastern Tarrant County and is part of the Dallas– Fort Worth
Fort Worth
metropolitan area. It is considered a Dallas
Dallas
and Fort Worth
Fort Worth
suburb and is part of the Mid-Cities region. It is 13 miles from the Dallas/ Fort Worth
Fort Worth
International Airport. As of the 2010 census, it had a population of 37,337.[6] The City
City
of Hurst is surrounded by other communities including, Bedford, Euless, Fort Worth, Richland Hills, North Richland Hills, Grapevine, and Colleyvile
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Henry Blackaby
Henry T. Blackaby is the founder of Blackaby Ministries International and an influential evangelical pastor.[1] Most known for his best selling study called Experiencing God, he has also authored many other books and articles. Blackaby's lifetime of work has had a significant impact upon the religious life of many evangelicals in the United States and Canada. His books have been translated into more than 40 languages and have had worldwide influence.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Education 3 Books 4 ReferencesBackground[edit] Henry T. Blackaby was born in British Columbia. He studied English and History at the University of British Columbia as an undergraduate and earned his B.D. and Th.M. from Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary. He also holds four honorary doctorate degrees
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Ebby Halliday
Ebby Halliday (born Vera Lucille Koch;[1] March 9, 1911 – September 8, 2015) was a United States of America realtor and businesswoman who founded Ebby Halliday Realtors. She was one of the first successful female entrepreneurs in Dallas. Halliday was born in Leslie, Arkansas,[2] and graduated from high school in Abilene, Kansas, in 1929. She got a $10-a-week job selling women's hats at The Jones Store in Kansas City. In less than a year, she was the top salesperson. In 1938, she was asked to take over the millinery department at Dallas' W.A. Green Store
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Southern Association Of Colleges And Schools
The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
(SACS) is one of the six regional accreditation organizations recognized by the United States Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation. This agency accredits over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. Its headquarters are in North Druid Hills, Georgia, near Decatur and in the Atlanta metropolitan area.[1][2] SACS accredits educational institutions in the states of Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, as well as schools for US students in Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. There are a number of affiliate organizations within the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools
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