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Dainagon
Dainagon
Dainagon
(大納言) was a counselor of the first rank in the Imperial court of Japan.[1] The role dates from the 7th century. This advisory position remained a part of the Imperial court from the 8th century until the Meiji period
Meiji period
in the 19th century.[2] The post was created in 702 by the Taihō Code, and evolved out of the earlier post Oimonomōsu-tsukasa. Holders of the office were of the Senior Third Rank. They assisted the Minister of the Left (the Sadaijin) and the Minister of the Right (the Udaijin).[3] By the mid-17th century, the Dainagon
Dainagon
counselor or state, was expected to work closely the Minister of the Center (the Naidaijin), whose position ranked just below the Udaijin
Udaijin
and the Sadaijin
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History Of Japan
The first human habitation in the Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
has been traced to prehistoric times. The Jōmon period, named after its "cord-marked" pottery, was followed by the Yayoi
Yayoi
in the first millennium BC, when new technologies were introduced from continental Asia. During this period, the first known written reference to Japan
Japan
was recorded in the Chinese Book of Han
Book of Han
in the first century AD. Between the fourth century and the ninth century, Japan's many kingdoms and tribes gradually came to be unified under a centralized government, nominally controlled by the Emperor. This imperial dynasty continues to reign over Japan. In 794, a new imperial capital was established at Heian-kyō
Heian-kyō
(modern Kyoto), marking the beginning of the Heian period, which lasted until 1185
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Nara Period
The Nara period
Nara period
(奈良時代, Nara jidai) of the history of Japan covers the years from AD 710 to 794.[1] Empress Genmei
Empress Genmei
established the capital of Heijō-kyō
Heijō-kyō
(present-day Nara). Except for a five-year period (740–745), when the capital was briefly moved again, it remained the capital of Japanese civilization until Emperor Kanmu established a new capital, Nagaoka-kyō, in 784, before moving to Heian-kyō, or Kyoto, a decade later in 794. Most of Japanese society during this period was agricultural in nature and centered on villages
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Sesshō And Kampaku
In Japan, Sesshō (摂政) was a title given to a regent who was named to act on behalf of either a child emperor before his coming of age, or an empress regnant. The Kanpaku (関白) was theoretically a sort of chief advisor for the emperor, but was the title of both first secretary and regent who assists an adult emperor. During a certain period in the Heian era, they were the effective rulers of Japan. There was little, if any, effective difference between the two titles, and several individuals merely changed titles as child emperors grew to adulthood, or adult emperors retired or died and were replaced by child emperors. The two titles were collectively known as Sekkan (摂関), and the families that exclusively held the titles were called Sekkan-ke or Sekkan family
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Imperial Household Agency
The Imperial Household Agency
Imperial Household Agency
(宮内庁, Kunai-chō) is an agency of the government of Japan
Japan
in charge of state matters concerning the Imperial Family and also keeping of the Privy Seal and State Seal of Japan
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Google Books
Google
Google
Books (previously known as Google
Google
Bo
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Harvard University Press
Harvard University
Harvard University
Press (HUP) is a publishing house established on January 13, 1913, as a division of Harvard University, and focused on academic publishing.[2] In 2005, it published 220 new titles. It is a member of the Association of American University Presses. After the retirement of William P. Sisler in 2017, George Andreou was appointed as Director[3]; the editor-in-chief is Susan Wallace Boehmer. The press maintains offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts, near Harvard Square, in New York City, and in London, England. The press co-owns the distributor TriLiteral LLC with MIT Press
MIT Press
and Yale University Press.[4] Notable authors published by HUP include Eudora Welty, Walter Benjamin, E. O
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Ozaki Yukio
Yukio Ozaki
Yukio Ozaki
(尾崎 行雄, Ozaki Yukio, born December 24, 1859 – October 6, 1954) was a Japanese politician of liberal signature, born in modern-day Sagamihara, Kanagawa.[1] Ozaki served in the House of Representatives of the Japanese Diet for 63 years (1890–1953). He is still revered in Japan as the "God of constitutional politics" and the "father of the Japanese Constitution".Contents1 Biography 2 Honors 3 Notes 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]Ozaki in 1917Ozaki was one of three children of Ozaki Yukimasa and his wife Sadako, who lived in the village of Matano, in the county of Tsukui, in Kanagawa Prefecture, in the Sagami hills, 35 miles west of Edo (present-day Tokyo)
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Meiji Period
The Meiji period
Meiji period
(明治時代, Meiji-jidai), also known as the Meiji era, is a Japanese era which extended from October 23, 1868, to July 30, 1912.[1] This period represents the first half of the Empire of Japan
Japan
during which Japanese society moved from being an isolated feudal society to its modern form. Fundamental changes affected its social structure, internal politics, economy, military, and foreign relations. The period corresponded to the reign of Emperor Meiji
Emperor Meiji
after 1868, and lasted until his death in 1912
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George Bailey Sansom
Sir George Bailey Sansom GBE KCMG (28 November 1883 – 8 March 1965) was a British diplomat and historian of pre-modern Japan, particularly noted for his historical surveys and his attention to Japanese society and culture.Contents1 Early life 2 Diplomatic service 3 Wartime service 4 Post-war career 5 Works 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Sansom was born in London, where his father was a naval architect, but was educated in France and Germany, including the University of Giessen and the University of Marburg. He passed an examination for the Diplomatic Service in September 1903. Diplomatic service[edit] Sansom first arrived in Japan in 1904 and was attached to the British legation in Tokyo to learn the Japanese language
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OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
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Timon Screech
Timon Screech (born 28 September 1961 in Birmingham) is a professor of the history of art at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. He is a specialist in the art and culture of early modern Japan. In 1985, Timon Screech received a BA in Oriental Studies (Japanese) at the University of Oxford. In 1991, he completed his PhD in art history at Harvard University. Since graduating from Harvard, he has been at SOAS; and he has also been visiting professor of Art History at the University of Chicago, and guest researcher at Gakushuin University and Waseda University
Waseda University
in Tokyo. Screech is a Permanent Visiting Professor at Tama University of the Arts, Tokyo
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Isaac Titsingh
Isaac Titsingh
Isaac Titsingh
FRS (10 January 1745 in Amsterdam
Amsterdam
– 2 February 1812 in Paris) was a Dutch scholar, merchant-trader and ambassador. His father was a surgeon.[1] During a long career in East Asia, Titsingh was a senior official of the Dutch East India Company
Dutch East India Company
(Dutch: Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC)). He represented the European trading company in exclusive official contact with Tokugawa Japan, traveling to Edo
Edo
twice for audiences with the shōgun and other high bakufu officials. He was the Dutch and VOC governor general in Chinsura, Bengal. Titsingh worked with his counterpart, Charles Cornwallis, who was governor general of the British East India Company
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Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
Nihon Ōdai Ichiran
(日本王代一覧, Nihon ōdai ichiran), The Table of the Rulers of Japan, is a 17th-century chronicle of the serial reigns of Japanese emperors with brief notes about some of the noteworthy events or other happenings.[1] According to the 1871 edition of the American Cyclopaedia, the French translation of Nihon Ōdai Ichiran<
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