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DNSSEC
The Domain Name System
Domain Name System
Security Extensions (DNSSEC) is a suite of Internet Engineering Task Force
Internet Engineering Task Force
(IETF) specifications for securing certain kinds of information provided by the Domain Name System
Domain Name System
(DNS) as used on Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) networks
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Internet Security
Internet
Internet
security is a branch of computer security specifically related to the Internet, often involving browser security but also network security on a more general level, as it applies to other applications or operating systems as a whole. Its objective is to establish rules and measures to use against attacks over the Internet.[1] The Internet
Internet
represents an insecure channel for exchanging information leading to a high risk of intrusion or fraud, such as phishing[2], online viruses, trojans, worms and more. Many methods are used to protect the transfer of data, including encryption and from-the-ground-up engineering
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Top-level Domain
A top-level domain (TLD) is one of the domains at the highest level in the hierarchical Domain Name System
Domain Name System
of the Internet.[10] The top-level domain names are installed in the root zone of the name space. For all domains in lower levels, it is the last part of the domain name, that is, the last label of a fully qualified domain name
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Kerberos (protocol)
Kerberos /ˈkərbərɒs/ is a computer network authentication protocol that works on the basis of tickets to allow nodes communicating over a non-secure network to prove their identity to one another in a secure manner. The protocol was named after the character Kerberos (or Cerberus) from Greek mythology, the ferocious three-headed guard dog of Hades. Its designers aimed it primarily at a client–server model and it provides mutual authentication—both the user and the server verify each other's identity
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Message Authentication
In information security, message authentication or data origin authentication is a property that a message has not been modified while in transit (data integrity) and that the receiving party can verify the source of the message.[1] Message authentication does not necessarily include the property of non-repudiation.[2][3] Message authentication is typically achieved by using message authentication codes (MACs), authenticated encryption (AE) or digital signatures.[2] Some cryptographers distinguish between "message authentication without secrecy" systems -- which allow the intended receiver to veri
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Backward Compatibility
Backward compatibility
Backward compatibility
is a property of a system, product, or technology that allows for interoperability with an older legacy system, or with input designed for such a system, especially in telecommunications and computing. Backward compatibility
Backward compatibility
is sometimes also called downward compatibility.[1] Modifying a system in a way that does not allow backward compatibility is sometimes called "breaking" backward compatibility.[2] A complementary concept is forward compatibility
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Digital Signature
A digital signature is a mathematical scheme for demonstrating the authenticity of digital messages or documents
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CERT Record
A recording, record or records may mean:Contents1 An item or collection of data 2 Entertainment 3 Sports 4 Periodicals 5 Other uses 6 See alsoAn item or collection of data[edit]Sound recording and reproductionAnalogue recording Digital recording Phonograph record, a mechanical analog audio storage mediumVideo recording, of both images and sounds Image recordingPhotography Moving pictures Record (computer science), a data structureStorage record, a basic input/output structure Record (database), a set of fields in a database related to one entity Boot record, record used to start an operating system<
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IPsec
In computing, Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
Security (IPsec) is a network protocol suite that authenticates and encrypts the packets of data sent over a network. IPsec includes protocols for establishing mutual authentication between agents at the beginning of the session and negotiation of cryptographic keys to use during the session. IPsec can protect data flows between a pair of hosts (host-to-host), between a pair of security gateways (network-to-network), or between a security gateway and a host (network-to-host).[1] Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
security (IPsec) uses cryptographic security services to protect communications over Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP) networks
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DNS Zone Transfer
DNS zone transfer, also sometimes known by the inducing DNS query type AXFR, is a type of DNS transaction. It is one of the many mechanisms available for administrators to replicate DNS databases across a set of DNS servers. A zone transfer uses the Transmission Control Protocol
Transmission Control Protocol
(TCP) for transport, and takes the form of a client–server transaction. The client requesting a zone transfer may be a slave server or secondary server, requesting data from a master server, sometimes called a primary server. The portion of the database that is replicated is a zone. Zone transfer comprises a preamble followed by the actual data transfer. The preamble comprises a lookup of the Start of Authority (SOA) resource record for the "zone apex", the node of the DNS namespace that is at the top of the "zone"
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Microsoft Windows
Microsoft
Microsoft
Windows is a group of several graphical operating system families, all of which are developed, marketed, and sold by Microsoft. Each family caters to a certain sector of the computing industry. Active Windows families include Windows NT
Windows NT
and Windows Embedded; these may encompass subfamilies, e.g. Windows Embedded
Windows Embedded
Compact (Windows CE) or Windows Server
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Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol
The Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP) is an obsolete method for implementing virtual private networks, with many known security issues. PPTP uses a TCP control channel and a Generic Routing Encapsulation tunnel to encapsulate PPP packets. The PPTP specification does not describe encryption or authentication features and relies on the Point-to-Point Protocol being tunneled to implement security functionality. However, the most common PPTP implementation shipping with the Microsoft Windows
Microsoft Windows
product families implements various levels of authentication and encryption natively as standard features of the Windows PPTP stack
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Internet Service Provider
An Internet
Internet
service provider (ISP) is an organization that provides services for accessing, using, or participating in the Internet. Internet
Internet
service providers may be organized in various forms, such as commercial, communi
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Chain Of Trust
In computer security, a chain of trust is established by validating each component of hardware and software from the end entity up to the root certificate. It is intended to ensure that only trusted software and hardware can be used while still retaining flexibility. Introduction[edit] A chain of trust is designed to allow multiple users to create and use software on the system, which would be more difficult if all the keys were stored directly in hardware. It starts with hardware that will only boot from software that is digitally signed. The signing authority will only sign boot programs that enforce security, such as only running programs that are themselves signed, or only allowing signed code to have access to certain features of the machine. This process may continue for several layers. This process results in a chain of trust
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Trusted Third Party
In cryptography, a trusted third party (TTP) is an entity which facilitates interactions between two parties who both trust the third party; the Third Party reviews all critical transaction communications between the parties, based on the ease of creating fraudulent digital content. In TTP models, the relying parties use this trust to secure their own interactions. TTPs are common in any number of commercial transactions and in cryptographic digital transactions as well as cryptographic protocols, for example, a certificate authority (CA) would issue a digital identity certificate to one of the two parties in the next example. The CA then becomes the Trusted-Third-Party to that certificates issuance. Likewise transactions that need a third party recordation would also need a third-party repository service of some kind or another. 'Trusted' means that a system need to be trusted to act in your interests
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Backward-compatible
Backward compatibility
Backward compatibility
is a property of a system, product, or technology that allows for interoperability with an older legacy system, or with input designed for such a system, especially in telecommunications and computing. Backward compatibility
Backward compatibility
is sometimes also called downward compatibility.[1] Modifying a system in a way that does not allow backward compatibility is sometimes called "breaking" backward compatibility.[2] A complementary concept is forward compatibility
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