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Types Of Business Entity
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law[Note 1] in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service.[citation needed] There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability companies and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province. Some of these types are listed below, by country. For guidance, approximate equivalents in the company law of English-speaking countries are given in most cases, for example: However, the regulations governing particular types of entities, even those described as roughly equivalent, differ from jurisdiction to jurisdiction
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Backchannel (blog)

Backchannel is an online magazine that publishes in-depth stories on technology-related news. Numerous prominent journalists have been recruited to write for the site, including Steven Levy,[1] Andrew Leonard,[2] Susan P. Crawford,[3] Virginia Heffernan,[4] Doug Menuez,[5] Peter Diamandis,[6] Jessi Hempel, and many others
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Condé Nast
Condé Nast (/ˌkɒndˈnæst/) is a global mass media company founded in 1909 by Condé Montrose Nast, and owned by Advance Publications.[1] Its headquarters are located at One World Trade Center in New York and The Adelphi building in London. The company's media brands attract more than 84 million consumers in print, 366 million in digital and 384 million across social platforms
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Wired (magazine)

Wired (stylized as WIRED) is a monthly American magazine, published in print and online editions, that focuses on how emerging technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. Owned by Condé Nast, it is headquartered in San Francisco, California, and has been in publication since March/April 1993.[2] Several spin-offs have been launched, including Wired UK, Wired Italia, Wired Japan, and Wired Germany. Condé Nast's parent company Advance Publications is also the major shareholder of Reddit, an internet information conglomeration website.[3] In its earliest colophons, Wired credited Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan as its "patron saint"
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Gratuity
A gratuity (also called a tip) is a sum of money customarily given by a client or customer to certain service sector workers for the service they have performed, in addition to the basic price of the service. It may or may not be customary to tip servers in bars and restaurants, taxi drivers (including ridesharing), hair stylists and so on, but this depends on the country or location.[1] Giving a tip is typically irreversible, differentiating it from the reward mechanism of a placed order, which can be refunded.[2] Tips and their amount are a matter of social custom and etiquette, and the custom varies between countries and between settings
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Holacracy
Holacracy is a method of decentralized management and organizational governance, in which authority and decision-making are distributed throughout a holarchy of self-organizing teams rather than being vested in a management hierarchy.[1] Holacracy has been adopted by for-profit and non-profit organizations in several countries.[2] The Holacracy system was developed at Ternary Software, an Exton, Pennsylvania company that was noted for experimenting with more democratic forms of organizational governance.[3] Ternary founder Brian Robertson distilled the company's best practices into an organizational system that became known as Holacracy in 2007.[4] Robertson later developed the "Holacracy Constitution", which lays out the core principles and practices of the system
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Corporate Governance
Corporate governance is the collection of mechanisms, processes and relations used by various parties to control and to operate corporations.[1][need quotation to verify][2] Governance structures and principles identify the distribution of rights and responsibilities among different participants in the corporation (such as the board of directors, managers, shareholders, creditors, auditors, regulators, and other stakeholders) and include the rules and procedures for making decisions in corporate affairs.[3] Corporate governance is necessary because of the possibility of conflicts of interests between stakeholders,[4] primarily between shareholders and upper management or among shareholders. Corporate governance includes the processes through which corporations' objectives are set and pursued in the context of the social, regulatory and market environment
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Privately Held Company
A privately held company, private company, or close corporation is a corporation that is not owned by the government, non-governmental organizations or by a relatively small number of shareholders or company members which does not offer or trade its company stock (shares) to the general public on the stock market exchanges, but rather the company's stock is offered, owned and traded or exchanged privately or over-the-counter. More ambiguous terms for a privately held company are closely held corporation, unquoted company, and unlisted company. Though less visible than their publicly traded counterparts, private companies have major importance in the world's economy. In 2008, the 441 largest private companies in the United States accounted for US$1,800,000,000,000 ($1.8 trillion) in revenues and employed 6.2 million people, according to Forbes
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