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Cucumis
Cucumis
Cucumis
is a genus of twining, tendril-bearing plants in the Cucurbitaceae
Cucurbitaceae
family which includes the cucumber ( Cucumis
Cucumis
sativus), muskmelons ( Cucumis
Cucumis
melo, including cantaloupe and honeydew), the horned melon ( Cucumis
Cucumis
metuliferus), and the West Indian gherkin ( Cucumis
Cucumis
anguria). 30 species occur in Africa, and 25 occur in India, Southeast Asia, and Australia.[1]Contents1 See also 2 References 3 Bibliography 4 External linksSee also[edit]Bailan melon Galia melon Hami melon Korean melon Santa Claus melon Sugar melon Winter melonReferences[edit]^ Sebastian et al. (2010); Telford et al. (2011)Bibliography[edit]Ghebretinsae, A. G., Thulin, M. & Barber, J. C
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PubMed Identifier
PubMed
PubMed
is a free search engine accessing primarily the MEDLINE database of references and abstracts on life sciences and biomedical topics. The United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM) at the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
maintains the database as part of the Entrez
Entrez
system of information retrieval. From 1971 to 1997, MEDLINE online access to the MEDLARS Online computerized database primarily had been through institutional facilities, such as university libraries
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Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature, a synonym is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name,[1] although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature.[2] For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription, position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature)
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PubMed Central
PubMed
PubMed
Central (PMC) is a free digital repository that archives publicly accessible full-text scholarly articles that have been published within the biomedical and life sciences journal literature. As one of the major research databases within the suite of resources that have been developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), PubMed
PubMed
Central is much more than just a document repository
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of AustraliaFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Advance Australia
Australia
Fair"[N 1]Capital Canberra 35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest city SydneyNational language English[N 2]DemonymAustralian Aussie
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Southeast Asia
Southeast Asia
Asia
or Southeastern Asia
Asia
is a subregion of Asia, consisting of the countries that are geographically south of China, east of India, west of New Guinea
New Guinea
and north of Australia.[4] Southeast Asia
Asia
is bordered to the north by East Asia, to the west by South Asia
Asia
and Bay of Bengal, to the east by Oceania
Oceania
and Pacific Ocean, and to the south by Australia
Australia
and Indian Ocean. The region is the only part of Asia that lies partly within the Southern Hemisphere, although the majority of it is in the Northern Hemisphere
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Africa
Africa
Africa
is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (the first being Asia
Asia
in both categories). At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles) including adjacent islands, it covers 6% of Earth's total surface area and 20% of its total land area.[3] With 1.2 billion[1] people as of 2016, it accounts for about 16% of the world's human population. The continent is surrounded by the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the north, both the Suez Canal and the Red Sea
Red Sea
along the Sinai Peninsula
Sinai Peninsula
to the northeast, the Indian Ocean
Ocean
to the southeast and the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the west. The continent includes Madagascar
Madagascar
and various archipelagos
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Family (biology)
In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major taxonomic ranks; it is classified between order and genus. A family may be divided into subfamilies, which are intermediate ranks above the rank of genus. In vernacular usage, a family may be named after one of its common members; for example, walnuts and hickory trees belong to the family Juglandaceae, commonly known as the walnut family. What does or does not belong to a family—or whether a described family should be recognized at all—are proposed and determined by practicing taxonomists. There are no hard rules for describing or recognizing a family, or any taxa. Taxonomists often take different positions about descriptions of taxa, and there may be no broad consensus across the scientific community for some time
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Tendril
In botany, a tendril is a specialized stem, leaves or petiole with a threadlike shape that is used by climbing plants for support, attachment and cellular invasion by parasitic plants, generally by twining around suitable hosts found by touch. They do not have a lamina or blade, but they can photosynthesize. They can be formed from modified shoots, modified leaves, or auxiliary branches and are sensitive to airborne chemicals, often determining the direction of growth, as in species of Cuscuta.[1]Contents1 History 2 Biology of tendrils2.1 Self-discrimination3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest and most comprehensive study of tendrils was Charles Darwin's monograph On the Movements and Habits of Climbing Plants, which was originally published in 1865. This work also coined the term circumnutation to describe the motion of growing stems and tendrils seeking supports
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Hook.f.
Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker
Joseph Dalton Hooker
OM GCSI CB PRS (30 June 1817 – 10 December 1911) was a British botanist and explorer in the 19th century
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Arn.
George Arnott Walker-Arnott of Arlary FRSE (6 February 1799 – 17 June 1868) was a Scottish botanist.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life and death 4 Standard author abbreviation 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] George Arnott Walker-Arnott was born in Edinburgh in 1799 the son of David Walker Arnott of Arlary. He attended Milnathort Parish School then the High School of Edinburgh.[1] He studied law in Edinburgh. Career[edit] Walker-Arnott became a botanist, holding the position of Regius Professor of Botany in the University of Glasgow from 1845 to 1868. He studied the botany of North America with Sir William Hooker and collaborated with Robert Wight in studies of Indian botany. He was a member of the Societe de Histoire Naturelle in Paris and the Moscow Imperial Society of Natural History. Personal life and death[edit] Walker-Arnott married Mary Hay Barclay in 1831
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Mill.
Philip Miller FRS (1691 – 18 December 1771) was an English botanist of Scottish descent.[1] Born in Deptford or Greenwich[2] Miller was chief gardener at the Chelsea Physic Garden
Chelsea Physic Garden
from 1722[3] until he was pressured to retire shortly before his death
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C.B.Clarke
Charles Baron Clarke (17 June 1832 – 25 August 1906) was a British botanist. He was born at Andover, the eldest son of Turner Poulter Clarke. He was educated at King's College School, London, and at Trinity and Queens' Colleges, Cambridge. He began the study of law at Lincoln's Inn
Lincoln's Inn
in 1856 and was called to the bar in 1860.[1] He lectured in mathematics at Presidency College, Calcutta, from 1857 to 1865. Clarke was Inspector of Schools in Eastern Bengal and later of India, and superintendent of the Calcutta Botanical Garden from 1869 to 1871. He retired from the Indian Civil Service
Indian Civil Service
in 1887. He was president of the Linnean Society
Linnean Society
from 1894 to 1896, and was elected a fellow of the Royal Society
Royal Society
in 1882
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Chiov.
Emilio Chiovenda (18 May 1871 – 19 February 1941) was an Italian botanist.[1] Chiovenda was born in Rome in 1871 to a family originating from rural Piedmont. He was educated at the Collegio Rosmini in Stresa and Domodossola College before graduating in Natural Sciences from the University of Rome in 1898.[2] He frequently collaborated with Pietro Romualdo Pirotta, under whom he had studied in Rome, including on an unfinished catalogue of flora in Rome and on The flora of the colony of Eritrea. He initially specialised in the flora of the Val d'Ossola valley in Piedmont, where his family had ancestral roots
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