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Cthulhu Mythos
The Cthulhu
Cthulhu
Mythos is a shared fictional universe, based on the work of American horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. The term was coined by August Derleth, a contemporary correspondent and protégé of Lovecraft, to identify the settings, tropes, and lore that were employed by Lovecraft
Lovecraft
and his literary successors. The name Cthulhu derives from the central creature in Lovecraft's seminal short story, "The Call of Cthulhu", first published in the pulp magazine Weird Tales in 1928.[1] Richard L
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1931 In Literature
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1931.Contents1 Events 2 New books2.1 Fiction 2.2 Children and young people 2.3 Drama 2.4 Non-fiction3 Births 4 Deaths 5 Awards 6 ReferencesEvents[edit]January 10 – A rare copy of Edgar Allan Poe's Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane, and Other Poems together with first editions of The Scarlet Letter and Moby-Dick, are stolen from the New York Public Library by Samuel Dupree acting on behalf of crooked New York antiquarian book dealer Harry Gold.[1] January 26 – Cherokee playwright Lynn Riggs' play Green Grow the Lilacs opens in New York on Broadway. It will later be adapted by Rodgers and Hammerstein as Oklahoma![2] April – Gerald Brenan and Gamel Woolsey make a form of marriage in Rome. June 1 – Near v
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1943 In Literature
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1943.Contents1 Events 2 New books2.1 Fiction 2.2 Children and young people 2.3 Drama 2.4 Non-fiction3 Births 4 Deaths 5 Awards 6 In literature 7 ReferencesEvents[edit]January 4 – Thomas Mann completes writing Joseph der Ernährer in California, last of the tetralogy Joseph and His Brothers (Joseph und seine Brüder) on which he began work in December 1926. February 4 – Première of Bertolt Brecht's The Good Person of Szechwan (Der gute Mensch von Sezuan) at the Schauspielhaus Zürich in Switzerland with Leonard Steckel directing.[1] March – Publication in New York of exiled French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's self-illustrated children's novella The Little Prince, the all-time best-selling book originated in French. May – A strongly antisemitic production of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice is staged at the Burgtheater in Vienna with Werner Krauss as Shyloc
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Cognitive Dissonance
In the field of psychology, cognitive dissonance is the mental discomfort (psychological stress) experienced by a person who simultaneously holds two or more contradictory beliefs, ideas, or values. The occurrence of cognitive dissonance is a consequence of a person performing an action that contradicts personal beliefs, ideals, and values; and also occurs when confronted with new information that contradicts said beliefs, ideals, and values.[1][2] In A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance (1957), Leon Festinger proposed that human beings strive for internal psychological consistency in order to mentally function in the real world. A person who experiences internal inconsistency tends to become psychologically uncomfortable, and is motivated to reduce the cognitive dissonance
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Dirk W. Mosig
Yōzan Dirk W. Mosig (born 1943) is a psychologist, historian, literary critic and ordained Zen monk noted for his critical work on H. P. Lovecraft. He was born in Germany and lived for several years in Argentina before emigrating to the United States. He received his Ph.D at the University of Florida in 1974. Between 1973 and 1978, Mosig published numerous important essays assessing Lovecraft's work. To cite but three, Mosig's 1973 essay "Toward a Greater Appreciation of H.P. Lovecraft: The Analytical Approach" is a psychological interpretation (based on the theories of C.G. Jung) of many Lovecraft stories. [1] The pioneering and oft-reprinted "H. P. Lovecraft: Myth Maker" (1976) explores Lovecraft's philosophy of horror, takes issue with August Derleth's distorted interpretation of Lovecraft's myth-cycle and emphasises the latter's vision of an amoral cosmos in which humanity has little significance
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New England
New England
New England
is a geographical region comprising six states of the northeastern United States: Maine, Vermont, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut.[a] It is bordered by the state of New York to the west and by the Canadian provinces of New Brunswick and Quebec
Quebec
to the northeast and north, respectively. The Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
is to the east and southeast, and Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound
is to the south. Boston
Boston
is New England's largest city as well as the capital of Massachusetts
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Deity
A deity (/ˈdiːəti/ ( listen) or /ˈdeɪ.əti/ ( listen))[1] is a hypothetical supernatural being considered divine or sacred.[2] The Oxford Dictionary of English defines deity as "a god or goddess (in a polytheistic religion)", or anything revered as divine.[3] C
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Classical Element
Classical elements typically refer to the concepts in ancient Greece of earth, water, air, fire, and aether, which were proposed to explain the nature and complexity of all matter in terms of simpler substances.[1][2] Ancient cultures in Egypt, Babylonia, Japan, Tibet, and India had similar lists, sometimes referring in local languages to "air" as "wind" and the fifth element as "void". The Chinese Wu Xing system lists Wood (木 mù), Fire (火 huǒ), Earth (土 tǔ), Metal (金 jīn), and Water (水 shuǐ), though these are described more as energies or transitions rather than as types of material. These different cultures and even individual philosophers had widely varying explanations concerning their attributes and how they related to observable phenomena as well as cosmology. Sometimes these theories overlapped with mythology and were personified in deities
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Race (fantasy)
Fantasy
Fantasy
tropes are a specific type of literary tropes that occur in fantasy fiction. Worldbuilding, plot, and characterization have many common conventions. Literary fantasy works operate using these tropes, while others use them in a revisionist manner, making the tropes over for various reasons such as for comic effect, and to create something fresh (a method that often generates new clichés).[1]Contents1 Good vs. evil1.1 Hero 1.2 Dark Lord2 Quest 3 Magic 4 Medievalism4.1 Ancient world5 Races 6 See also=6.1 References 6.2 SourcesGood vs. evil[edit] The conflict of good against evil is a theme in the many popular forms of fantasy; normally, evil characters invade and disrupt the good characters' lands.[2] J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R

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Henry S. Whitehead
Henry St. Clair Whitehead (March 5, 1882 – November 23, 1932) was an American writer of horror fiction and fantasy[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Short fiction 2.2 Collections 2.3 Novels for boys3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksBiography[edit] Henry S. Whitehead was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey, on March 5, 1882, and graduated from Harvard University in 1904 (in the same class as Franklin D. Roosevelt).[2] He led an active and worldly life in the first decade of the 20th century, playing football at Harvard, editing a Reform democratic newspaper in Port Chester, New York, and serving as commissioner of athletics for the AAU. He later attended Berkeley Divinity School in Middletown, Connecticut, and was ordained a deacon in the Episcopal Church in 1912. From 1918 to 1919 he was Pastor of the Children, Church of St. Mary the Virgin, New York City. He served as Archdeacon of the Virgin Islands from 1921 to 1929.[1] While there, living on the island of St
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Pulp Magazine
Pulp magazines
Pulp magazines
or Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction
(often referred to as "the pulps") were inexpensive fiction magazines that were published from 1896 to the 1950s. The term pulp derives from the cheap wood pulp paper on which the magazines were printed. In contrast, magazines printed on higher-quality paper were called "glossies" or "slicks". The typical pulp magazine had 128 pages; it was 7 inches (18 cm) wide by 10 inches (25 cm) high, and 0.5 inches (1.3 cm) thick, with ragged, untrimmed edges. The pulps gave rise to the term pulp fiction in reference to run-of-the-mill, low-quality literature. Pulps were the successors to the penny dreadfuls, dime novels, and short-fiction magazines of the 19th century. Although many respected writers wrote for pulps, the magazines were best known for their lurid, exploitative, and sensational subject matter
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1936 In Literature
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1936.Contents1 Events 2 New books2.1 Fiction 2.2 Children and young people 2.3 Drama 2.4 Poetry 2.5 Non-fiction3 Births 4 Deaths 5 Awards 6 In fiction 7 ReferencesEvents[edit]The olive tree near Alfacar
Alfacar
where Federico García Lorca
Federico García Lorca
is executed on August 19[1]January 8 – Jewish booksellers throughout Nazi Germany are ordered to turn in their Reich Publications Chamber membership cards, without which no one is permitted to sell books.[2] May – Greek poet and Communist activist Yiannis Ritsos
Yiannis Ritsos
is inspired to write his landmark poem Epitaphios by a photograph of a dead protester during a massive tobacco-workers demonstration in Thessaloniki; it is published soon afterwards
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John Giunta
John Giunta
John Giunta
was an illustrator of comic books from the 1940s through the 1960s. He cooperated on horror titles like Tomb of Terror, Chamber of Chills (Harvey), Journey into Mystery
Journey into Mystery
and Weird Tales
Weird Tales
(Marvel). In 1944, he drew the first comic adaptation of O. Henry's Cisco Kid. In the early 1960s, he became a regular artist on The Fly for Archie Comics. He also cooperated on titles like Thunder Agents, Air Fighters Comics and Phantom Stranger.[1] References[edit]^ "John Giunta". lambiek.net. Retrieved 2016-09-14. External links[edit]"His books". comicbookdb.com
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1935 In Literature
This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1935.Contents1 Events 2 New books2.1 Fiction 2.2 Children and young people 2.3 Drama 2.4 Poetry 2.5 Non-fiction3 Births 4 Deaths 5 Awards 6 In literature 7 ReferencesEvents[edit]March – London publisher Boriswood pleads guilty and is fined in the north of England for publishing an "obscene" book, a 1934 cheap edition of James Hanley's 1931 novel Boy. May 13 – T. E. Lawrence (having left the British Royal Air Force in March) goes to post a parcel of books to his friend A. E. "Jock" Chambers[1] and to send a telegram inviting novelist Henry Williamson to lunch.[2] Returning to his home at Clouds Hill in England, he has an accident with his Brough Superior motorcycle, dying six days later. On July 29 his Seven Pillars of Wisdom is first published in an edition for general circulation. June 15W. H. Auden enters a marriage of convenience with Erika Mann.[3] Première of T. S
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Horror Fiction
Horror is a genre of fiction which is intended to, or has the capacity to frighten, scare, disgust, or startle its readers or viewers by inducing feelings of horror and terror. Literary historian J. A. Cuddon has defined the horror story as "a piece of fiction in prose of variable length... which shocks or even frightens the reader, or perhaps induces a feeling of repulsion or loathing".[1] It creates an eerie and frightening atmosphere. Horror is frequently supernatural, though it can be non-supernatural
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Shared Universe
A shared universe or shared world is a set of creative works where more than one writer (or other artist) independently contributes a work that can stand alone but fits into the joint development of the storyline, characters, or world of the overall project
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