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Criticism On Narendrapasads Souparnika
Criticism
Criticism
is the practice of judging the merits and faults of something. Crítica, engraving by Julio Ruelas, ca. 1907 The judger is called a critic. To engage in criticism is to criticise (in British English – see American and British English spelling differences.) One specific item of criticism is called a criticism or critique. Criticism
Criticism
is an evaluative or corrective exercise that can occur in any area of human life. Criticism
Criticism
can therefore take many different forms (see below). How people go about criticizing, can vary a great deal. In specific areas of human endeavour, the form of criticism can be highly specialized and technical; it often requires professional knowledge to appreciate the criticism
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Julio Ruelas
Julio Ruelas
Julio Ruelas
(June 21, 1870 - September 16, 1907) was a Mexican graphic artist, painter, draughtsman and printmaker. Ruelas was the principal illustrator of the Revista Moderna magazine and is most associated with Mexican symbolism. A number of his works are on display at the Museum of the City of Mexico
Mexico
and in the Zacatecas museum. Artistically, he was noted for creating etched images depicting his own face, incorporating black, twisted lines to give an impression of being tormented.[1] Born in Zacatecas, he lived in Mexico
Mexico
City from 1876, later attending the Colegio Militar and the Escuela de Bellas Artes
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Attention Span
Attention
Attention
span is the amount of concentrated time a person can spend on a task without becoming distracted. Most educators and psychologists agree that the ability to focus and sustain attention on a task is crucial for the achievement of one's goals.Contents1 Length of the span 2 Measurement 3 Research 4 Modern society 5 See also 6 ReferencesLength of the span[edit] Estimates for the length of human attention span are highly variable and depend on the precise definition of attention being used.Transient attention is a short-term response to a stimulus that temporarily attracts/distracts attention. Researchers disagree on the exact amount of human transient attention span. Selective sustained attention, also known as focused attention, is the level of attention that produces the consistent results on a task over time
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Critical Thinking
Critical thinking
Critical thinking
is the objective analysis of facts to form a judgment.[1] The subject is complex, and several different definitions exist, which generally include the rational, skeptical, unbiased analysis, or evaluation of factual evidence. Critical thinking
Critical thinking
is self-directed, self-disciplined, self-monitored, and self-corrective thinking. It presupposed assent to rigorous standards of excellence and mindful command to their use
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Art Criticism
Art
Art
criticism is the discussion or evaluation of visual art.[1][2][3] Art critics
Art critics
usually criticise art in the context of aesthetics or the theory of beauty.[2][3] A goal of art criticism
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Film Criticism
Film
Film
criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films and the film medium. The concept is often used interchangeably with that of the film reviews. A film review implies a recommendation aimed at consumers, however not all film criticism takes the form of reviews. In general, film criticism can be divided into two categories: journalistic criticism which appears regularly in newspapers, magazines and other popular mass-media outlets; and academic criticism by film scholars who are informed by film theory and are published in academic journals
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Theatre Criticism
Theatre criticism is a genre of arts criticism, and the act of writing or speaking about the performing arts such as a play or opera. Theatre criticism is distinct from drama criticism, as the later is a division of literary criticism whereas the former is a critique of the theatrical performance. Dramas or plays as long as they stay in the print form remain a part of literature. They become a part of the performing arts as soon as the written words of the drama are transformed into performance on the stage or any arena suitable for viewers to see. So the literary craft gives birth to a stage production. Likewise a criticism of a written play has a different character from that of a theatre performance. Criticism
Criticism
vs Review There is a distinctive dissimilarity between theatre criticism and a theatre review. Both of them deal with the dramatic arts as they are performed
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Architecture Criticism
Architecture criticism is the critique of architecture. Everyday criticism relates to published or broadcast critiques of buildings, whether completed or not, both in terms of news and other criteria. In many cases, criticism amounts to an assessment of the architect's success in meeting his or her own aims and objectives and those of others. The assessment may consider the subject from the perspective of some wider context, which may involve planning, social or aesthetic issues. It may also take a polemical position reflecting the critic's own values. At the most accessible extreme, architectural criticism is a branch of lifestyle journalism, especially in the case of high-end residential projects.Contents1 Media coverage 2 Criteria 3 Architectural journalists 4 Specialist periodicals 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksMedia coverage[edit] Most major national newspapers in developed countries cover the arts in some form
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Sublimation (psychology)
In psychology, sublimation is a mature type of defense mechanism, in which socially unacceptable impulses or idealizations are unconsciously transformed into socially acceptable actions or behavior, possibly resulting in a long-term conversion of the initial impulse. Sigmund Freud
Sigmund Freud
believed that sublimation was a sign of maturity and civilization, allowing people to function normally in culturally acceptable ways
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Psychological Repression
Psychological repression, or simply repression, is the psychological attempt made by an individual to direct one's own desires and impulses toward pleasurable instincts by excluding them from one's consciousness and holding or subduing them in the unconscious. According to psychoanalytic theory, repression plays a major role in many mental illnesses, and in the psyche of the average person.[1] Repression is a key concept of psychoanalysis, where it is understood as a defence mechanism that "ensures that what is unacceptable to the conscious mind, and would if recalled arouse anxiety, is prevented from entering into it."[2] There has been debate as to whether (or how often) memory repression really occur[3] and mainstream psychology holds that true memory repression occurs only very rarely.[4]Contents1 Freud's theory1.1 Stages 1.2 Therapy2 Later developments 3 Repressed memories 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksFreud's theory[edit] As
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Denial
Denial, in ordinary English usage, is asserting that a statement or allegation is not true.[1] The same word, and also abnegation (German: Verneinung), is used for a psychological defense mechanism postulated by psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud, in which a person is faced with a fact that is too uncomfortable to accept and rejects it instead, insisting that it is not true despite what may be overwhelming evidence.[1][2][3] An individual that exhibits such behavior is described as a denialist[4] or true believer
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Bona Fide
Good faith (Latin: bona fides), in human interactions, is a sincere intention to be fair, open, and honest, regardless of the outcome of the interaction. While some Latin phrases lose their literal meaning over centuries, this is not the case with bona fides; it is still widely used and interchangeable with its generally accepted modern-day English translation of good faith.[1] It is an important concept within law and business. The opposed concepts are bad faith, mala fides (duplicity) and perfidy (pretense). In contemporary English, the usage of bona fides (note the "s") is synonymous with credentials and identity. The phrase is sometimes used in job advertisements, and should not be confused with the bona fide occupational qualifications or the employer's good faith effort, as described below.Contents1 Bona fides 2 Law 3 Employment efforts 4 In wikis 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksBona fides[edit] Bona fides is a Latin phrase meaning "good faith"
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Rapport
Rapport is a close and harmonious relationship in which the people or groups concerned are “in sync” with each other, understand each other's feelings or ideas, and communicate smoothly. The word stems from the old French verb rapporter which means literally to carry something back;[1][2] and, in the sense of how people relate to each other means that what one person sends out the other sends back. For example, they may realize that they share similar values, beliefs, knowledge, or behaviors around politics, music or sports.[3] This may also mean that the participants engage in reciprocal behaviors such as posture mirroring or in increased coordination in their verbal and nonverbal interactions.[4] There are a number of techniques that are supposed to be beneficial in building rapport such as: matching your body language (i.e., posture, gesture, etc.);[4] indicating attentiveness through maintaining eye contact;[5] and matching breathing rhythm[citation needed]
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Feedback
Collective intelligence Collective action Self-organized criticality Herd mentality Phase transition Agent-based modelling Synchronization Ant colony optimization Particle swarm optimization Swarm behaviourNetworks Scale-free networks Social network analysis Small-world networks Community identification Centrality Motifs Graph Theory Scaling Robustness Systems biology Dynamic networks Adaptive networks Evolution
Evolution
and adaptation Artificial neural networks Evolutionary computation Genetic algorithms Genetic programming Artificial life Machine learning Evolutionary developmental biology Artific
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Facebook
Facebook
Facebook
is an American online social media and social networking service company based in Menlo Park, California. Its website was launched on February 4, 2004, by Mark Zuckerberg, along with fellow Harvard College
Harvard College
students and roommates Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes. The founders initially limited the website's membership to Harvard students. Later they expanded it to higher education institutions in the Boston area, the Ivy League
Ivy League
schools, and Stanford
Stanford
University. Facebook
Facebook
gradually added support for students at various other universities, and eventually to high school students. Since 2006, anyone who claims to be at least 13 years old has been allowed to become a registered user of Facebook, though variations exist in this requirement, depending on local laws
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Authority
Authority (derived from the Latin word auctoritas), as a concept, can be used to mean the right to exercise power given by the State (in the form of government, judges, police officers, etc.), or by academic knowledge of an area (someone that can be an authority on a subject) or, in some societies, by higher spiritual powers or deities. When the word authority is used in the name of an organization, this name usually refers to the governing body upon which such authority is vested; for example, the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority
Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority
or the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority. It can also mean the right to do something or execute an order.Contents1 In various settings1.1 Political philosophy 1.2 Other social sciences2 Max Weber 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksIn various settings[edit] In government, the term authority is often used interchangeably with power
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