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Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
is a shedding-type card game for two to seven players. The object of the game is to be the first to get rid of all the player's cards to a discard pile
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Three-card Monte
Three-card Monte
Three-card Monte
– also known as find the lady and three-card trick – is a confidence game in which the victim, or "mark", is tricked into betting a sum of money, on the assumption that they can find the "money card" among three face-down playing cards. It is the same as the shell game except that cards are used instead of shells.[1] In its full form, three-card Monte is an example of a classic "short con"[2] in which a shill pretends to conspire with the mark to cheat the dealer, while in fact conspiring with the dealer to cheat the mark. The mark has no chance whatsoever of winning, at any point in the game
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Screw Your Neighbour
Ranter-Go-Round (also known as Chase the Ace, Cuckoo, Bohemian Poker, Screw Your Neighbor, Stick or Swap, Bring the King, or Chicago Shuffle)[1] is a card game with bluffing elements. It is related to the dedicated deck card or tile game Gnav. Play[edit] Any number of players, 52 cards. The object is to not have the lowest card at the table. The ranking of cards from highest to lowest is: K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A, or alternately A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Suit is irrelevant.[2] Each player has an equal number of counters placed in front of them - usually from 2 to 4 - to mark his or her "lives". (Alternatively, a dollar bill or other note may be used, and players use the corners to mark their lives, folding a corner in when a life is lost.) Cards are dealt, one card to each, face down. Starting to the left of the dealer - each in turn examines their card. If they are satisfied with their card they may keep it, usually simply by announcing, "I'm good." or similar
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Tactic (method)
A tactic (from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
τακτική taktike meaning "art of arrangement") is a conceptual action aiming at the achievement of a goal
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Zimbabwe
Coordinates: 20°S 30°E / 20°S 30°E / -20; 30Republic of ZimbabweFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Unity, Freedom, Work"[1]Anthem:  "Blessed be the land of Zimbabwe"[2]Location of  Zimbabwe  (dark blue) in the African Union  (light blue)Capital and largest city Harare 17°50′S 31°3′E / 17.833°S 31.050°E / -17.833; 31.050Official languages16 languages[3]Chewa Chibarwe English Kalanga "Koisan" (presumably Tsoa) Nambya Ndau Ndebele Shangani Shona "sign language" Sotho Tonga Tswana Venda XhosaEthnic groups (2012)99.4% Black African (over 80% Shona; Ndebele are largest minority) 0.2% White African 0.4% others, including Coloured
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Face Card
In a deck of playing cards, the term face card is generally used to describe a card that depicts a person as opposed to the pip cards. They are also known as court cards, picture cards, or until the early 20th century, coat cards. History[edit] While playing cards were invented in China, Chinese playing cards
Chinese playing cards
do not have a concept of face cards. When playing cards arrived in Iran, the Persians created the first face cards. In their Ganjifeh decks, each suit had ten pip cards that are outranked by a mounted vizier and a seated king. Cards were transmitted further west where Mamluk Egypt created a third court card. The best preserved deck is located in the Topkapı Palace
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David Parlett
David Parlett (born 18 May 1939 in London)[1] is a games scholar, historian, and translator from South London, who has studied both card games and board games.[2] His published works include many popular books on games and the more academic volumes The Oxford Guide to Card Games and The Oxford History of Board Games, both now out of print. Parlett also invented a number of board games, the most successful of which is Hare and Tortoise
Hare and Tortoise
(1974)
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Daifugō
Daifugō
Daifugō
(大富豪, Grand Millionaire) or Daihinmin (大貧民, Extreme Needy) is a Japanese card game for three or more players played with a standard 52-card pack. The objective of the game is to get rid of all the cards one has as fast as possible by playing progressively stronger cards than those of the previous player. The winner is called the daifugō (the grand millionaire) earning various advantages in the next round, and the last person is called the daihinmin (the extreme needy). In that following round, winners can exchange their one or more unnecessary cards for advantageous ones that losers have. The game is very similar to the Chinese climbing card games Big Two and Zheng Shangyou, to the Vietnamese game Tien Len, and to Western card games like President, also known as Capitalism and Asshole, and The Great Dalmuti
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Section 8 (military)
Section 8 is a category of discharge from the United States military, used for a service member judged mentally unfit for service. It also came to mean any service member given such a discharge or behaving as if deserving such a discharge, as in the expression, "he's a Section 8". The term comes from Section VIII of the World War II-era United States Army Regulation 615-360, which provided for the discharge of those deemed unfit for military service.[1] Discharge under Section 8 is no longer practiced, as medical discharges for psychological/psychiatric reasons are now covered by a number of regulations. In the Army, such discharges are handled under the provisions of AR 635-200, Active Duty Enlisted Administrative Separations
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1] .mw-parser-output .nobold f
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Rumino
Rumino, ramino, rumina, is a knock rummy card game of Italian origin played up to 6 players in which players try to form sets or sequences of cards. It may possibly have been devised in American during the 1940s by Italian immigrants by adapting the game Scala Quaranta to Gin rummy.[citation needed] It is usually played for small stakes[1] Two 52-card decks are used plus four Jokers comprising 108 cards.Contents1 Object1.1 Knocking 1.2 Hitting Gin 1.3 Hitting Rumino 1.4 Re-Buying2 See also 3 References 4 External linksObject[edit] The aim of the game is to push the players over 100 points and keep a score low. All players draws a card from the deck, and the high card determines the dealer. Subsequent deals are passed to the left. Each player is dealt 7 cards, and the remaining stock pile is spread on the table
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Canasta
Canasta
Canasta
(/kəˈnæstə/; Spanish for "basket") is a card game of the rummy family of games believed to be a variant of 500 Rum.[1][2][3][4][5] Although many variations exist for two, three, five or six players, it is most commonly played by four in two partnerships with two standard decks of cards. Players attempt to make melds of seven cards of the same rank and "go out" by playing all cards in their hand
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Pasur (card Game)
Pasur (Persian: پاسور‎; also spelled Pasoor) is a fishing card game of Persian origin.[1] Played widely in Iran, it is played similarly to the Italian games of Cassino or Scopa[2] and even more similarly to the Egyptian game of Bastra. Pasur is also known by the names Chahâr Barg (4 cards), Haft Khâj (seven clubs) or Haft Va Chahâr, Yâzdah (7+4=11, the significance being that players want to win 7 clubs in a game of 4-card hands where 11 is a winning number).Contents1 Etymology 2 Rules2.1 Preliminaries 2.2 Deal 2.3 Play 2.4 Picking up cards 2.5 Surs 2.6 Scoring 2.7 Ending the game3 Variations3.1 Pasur Ru Baaz 3.2 Three Players4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The name "pasur" entered Persia
Persia
from the Russian Пacyp during the 19th century along with the playing cards themselves.[3] Rules[edit] Preliminaries[edit] One standard pack of 52 cards and 2, 3 or 4 players who take turns being dealer
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Carioca (card Game)
Carioca is a Latinoamerican card game similar to Rummy
Rummy
style card games with many variations. The variation described below is Perla's Cariocas.Contents1 Perla's Cariocas1.1 Objective 1.2 Gameplay 1.3 Hands 1.4 Card Values 1.5 Rounds 1.6 Rounds in other variations2 See also 3 External linksPerla's Cariocas[edit] Objective[edit] The objective of the game is to finish with the smallest number of points, like Golf. Gameplay[edit]Two decks of cards with two jokers are used (108 cards total) The cards are shuffled and each player takes a card from the top
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