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Cratinus
Cratinus (Greek: Κρατῖνος; 519 BC – 422 BC) was an Athenian comic poet of the Old Comedy. Cratinus was victorious 27 known times, eight[1] times at the City Dionysia, first probably in the mid-to-late 450s BCE (IG II2 2325. 50), and three times at the Lenaia, first probably in the early 430s (IG II2 2325. 121; just before Pherecrates and Hermippus). He was still competing in 423, when his Pytine took the prize at the City Dionysia; he died shortly thereafter, at a very advanced age, about 97 years (test. 3). Little is known of his personal history. His father's name was Callimedes, and he himself was a taxiarch. The Suda has brought several accusations against Cratinus. First, it accuses Cratinus of excessive cowardice. Secondly, a charge against the moral character. Thirdly, a charge of habitual intemperance
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Serifos
Serifos (Greek: Σέριφος, Latin: Seriphus, also Seriphos; Seriphos: Eth. Seriphios: Serpho) is a Greek island municipality in the Aegean Sea, located in the western Cyclades, south of Kythnos and northwest of Sifnos. It is part of the Milos regional unit. The area is 75.207 square kilometres (29.038 sq mi)[2] and the population was 1,420 at the 2011 census. It is located about 170 kilometres (92 nautical miles) ESE of the Athenian port of Piraeus. In Greek mythology, Serifos is where Danaë and her infant son Perseus washed ashore after her father Acrisius, in response to an oracle that his own grandson would kill him, set them adrift at sea in a wooden chest
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Trophonius
Trophonius (/trəˈfniəs/; Ancient Greek: Τροφώνιος Trophōnios) was a Greek hero or daimon or god—it was never certain which one—with a rich mythological tradition and an oracular cult at Lebadaea (Λιβαδειά; Levadia or Livadeia) in Boeotia, Greece. Similar constructions are also found in the Roman world
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Aeschylus
Aeschylus (UK: /ˈskɪləs/,[1] US: /ˈɛskɪləs/;[2] Greek: Αἰσχύλος Aiskhylos, pronounced [ai̯s.kʰý.los]; c. 525/524 – c. 456/455 BC) was an ancient Greek tragedian. He is often described as the father of tragedy.[3][4] Academics' knowledge of the genre begins with his work,[5] and understanding of earlier tragedies is largely based on inferences made from reading his surviving plays.[6] According to Aristotle, he expanded the number of characters in the theatre and allowed conflict among them. Before this, characters interacted only with the chorus.[nb 1] Only seven of his estimated seventy to ninety plays have survived. There is a long-standing debate regarding the authorship of one of these plays, Prometheus Bound. Some believe that his son Euphorion wrote it
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Rudolf Kassel
Rudolf Kassel (11 May 1926 – 26 February 2020) was a German classical philologist. He was a professor at the Free University of Berlin from 1963 to 1975 and subsequently the University of Cologne from 1975 until his retirement in 1991. Kassel was born on 11 May 1926 in Frankenthal.[1] In 1951 he obtained his doctorate at the University of Mainz. In 1956 Kassel obtained his habilitation at the University of Würzburg with a thesis on Greek and Roman consolation literature. At the University of Würzburg he also worked as a private teacher. In 1962 Kassel moved to the United Kingdom where he was Nellie Wallace Lecturer at the University of Oxford. One year later he returned to Germany and was appointed professor at the Free University of Berlin.[1] In 1975 Kassel moved to the University of Cologne where he became professor of Ancient Greek philology at the Institut für Altertumskunde
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Colin François Lloyd Austin
Colin François Lloyd Austin, FBA (26 July 1941 – 13 August 2010) was a British scholar of ancient Greek.[1] Colin Austin was born in Melbourne, Australia, in 1941, the second son of Lloyd James Austin (1915–1994) and of Jeanne-Françoise (née Guérin).[2] A few years later the family moved to France and then to Great Britain.[3] He was educated at the Lycée Lakanal, Paris, Manchester Grammar School, Jesus College, Cambridge, and Christ Church, Oxford, where Sir Hugh Lloyd-Jones supervised his DPhil on Aristophanes. He won the Hallam Prize in 1961, the Browne Medal in 1961 and the Porson Prize in 1962.[4] In 1969 he was appointed lecturer in the Faculty of Classics at Cambridge University and worked there as the Director of Studies in Classics until 2008. From 1998 to 2008 Austin was a full Professor of Greek
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August Meineke
Johann Albrecht Friedrich August Meineke (also Augustus Meineke; German: [ˈmaɪnəkə]; 8 December 1790 – 12 December 1870), German classical scholar, was born at Soest in the Duchy of Westphalia. He was father-in-law to philologist Theodor Bergk.[1] He obtained his education at the University of Leipzig as a student of Johann Gottfried Jakob Hermann. After holding an educational post at Danzig (now Gdańsk, Poland), he was director of the Joachimsthal Gymnasium in Berlin from 1826 to 1856.[2] In 1830 he became a member of the Berlin Academy
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Georg Kaibel
Georg Kaibel (30 October 1849 – 12 October 1901) was a German classical philologist born in Lübeck. He was a leading authority of Greek epigraphy and epigrammatics He studied classical philology at the Universities of Göttingen and Bonn. At Bonn he was a pupil of Hermann Usener and Franz Bücheler. In 1872–74 he was a member of the German Archaeological Institute in Rome, where he became a close associate of Theodor Mommsen and Ulrich von Wilamowitz-Moellendorff
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Wikisource
Wikisource is an online digital library of free-content textual sources on a wiki, operated by the Wikimedia Foundation. Wikisource is the name of the project as a whole and the name for each instance of that project (each instance usually representing a different language); multiple Wikisources make up the overall project of Wikisource. The project's aim is to host all forms of free text, in many languages, and translations. Originally conceived as an archive to store useful or important historical texts (its first text was the Déclaration universelle des Droits de l'Homme), it has expanded to become a general-content library. The project officially began in November 24, 2003 under the name Project Sourceberg, a play on the famous Project Gutenberg
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