HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Crater Lake
A crater lake is a lake that forms in a volcanic crater or caldera, such as a maar; less commonly and with lower association to the term a lake may form in an impact crater caused by a meteorite, or in the crater left by an artificial explosion caused by humans. Sometimes lakes which form inside calderas are called caldera lakes, but often this distinction is not made. Crater lakes covering active (fumarolic) volcanic vents are sometimes known as volcanic lakes, and the water within them is often acidic, saturated with volcanic gases, and cloudy with a strong greenish color
[...More...]

"Crater Lake" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Volcano
A volcano is a rupture in the crust of a planetary-mass object, such as Earth, that allows hot lava, volcanic ash, and gases to escape from a magma chamber below the surface. Earth's volcanoes occur because its crust is broken into 17 major, rigid tectonic plates that float on a hotter, softer layer in its mantle.[1] Therefore, on Earth, volcanoes are generally found where tectonic plates are diverging or converging, and most are found underwater. For example, a mid-oceanic ridge, such as the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, has volcanoes caused by divergent tectonic plates whereas the Pacific Ring of Fire
Pacific Ring of Fire
has volcanoes caused by convergent tectonic plates
[...More...]

"Volcano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

PH
In chemistry, pH (/piːˈeɪtʃ/) (potential of hydrogen) is a numeric scale used to specify the acidity or basicity of an aqueous solution. It is approximately the negative of the base 10 logarithm of the molar concentration, measured in units of moles per liter, of hydrogen ions. More precisely it is the negative of the base 10 logarithm of the activity of the hydrogen ion.[1] Solutions with a pH less than 7 are acidic and solutions with a pH greater than 7 are basic
[...More...]

"PH" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

ISS
The International Space Station
International Space Station
(ISS) is a space station, or a habitable artificial satellite, in low Earth
Earth
orbit. Its first component launched into orbit in 1998, the last pressurised module was fitted in 2011, and the station is expected to be used until 2028. Development and assembly of the station continues, with components scheduled for launch in 2018 and 2019. The ISS is the largest human-made body in low Earth
Earth
orbit and can often be seen with the naked eye from Earth.[8][9] The ISS consists of pressurised modules, external trusses, solar arrays, and other components
[...More...]

"ISS" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Wonchi
Wanchi, also sometimes erroneously spelt as "Wonchi", is one of the woredas in the Oromia Region of Ethiopia. It is located in the South Western Shawa Zone; bordered on the southwest by Amaya, on the north by Western Shawa Zone, and on the southeast by Waliso and Goro District. The administrative centre of Wanchi is Chitu. Dariyan and Haro have emerged as rapidly growing rural towns. The highest point in Wanchi is Wonchi volcano, which is about 3,450 metres (11,320 ft)[1] above sea level. Warqee (also known as Enset) is by far the most important staple crop in the area.Wanchi LakeWanchi lake is a crater lake located about equal distance between the town of Ambo and Woliso, at an altitude of about 3000m above sea level. Wonchi contains hot springs, waterfalls, valleys, and other scenery. In the island, an old monastery named Cherkos is found. Due to its unique topography, Wanchi is blessed with varieties of animal and plant species
[...More...]

"Wonchi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Dziani Dzaha
Dziani Dzaha is a crater lake on the island of Pamanzi in the French overseas territory of Mayotte.[1] References[edit]^ GEOnet Names Server (GNS)This Mayotte location article is a stub
[...More...]

"Dziani Dzaha" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kerið
Kerið (occasionally Anglicized as Kerith or Kerid) is a volcanic crater lake located in the Grímsnes area in south Iceland, along the Golden Circle. It is one of several crater lakes in the area, known as Iceland's Western Volcanic Zone, which includes the Reykjanes peninsula and the Langjökull Glacier, created as the land moved over a localized hotspot, but it is the one that has the most visually recognizable caldera still intact. The caldera, like the other volcanic rock in the area, is composed of a red (rather than black) volcanic rock. The caldera itself is approximately 55 m (180 ft) deep, 170 m (560 ft) wide, and 270 m (890 ft) across. Kerið’s caldera is one of the three most recognizable volcanic craters because at approximately 3,000 years old, it is only half the age of most of the surrounding volcanic features
[...More...]

"Kerið" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lake Yeak Laom
Yeak Loam (Khmer: បឹងយក្សឡោម, Khmer pronunciation: [jeaʔ laom]), also spelled Yak Lom or Yak Loum, is a lake and a popular tourist destination in the Ratanakiri
Ratanakiri
province of north-eastern Cambodia. Located approximately 3 mi (4.8 km) from the provincial capital, Banlung, the beautiful lake occupies a 4,000-year-old volcanic crater. Due to the lake’s tremendous depth 48 m (157 ft), its water is exceptionally clean and clear. The lake is almost perfectly round and measures 0.72 km (0.45 mi) in diameter
[...More...]

"Lake Yeak Laom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Fumarolic
A fumarole (or fumerole - the word ultimately comes from the Latin fumus, "smoke") is an opening in a planet's crust, often in areas surrounding volcanoes, which emits steam and gases such as carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, hydrogen chloride, and hydrogen sulfide. The steam forms when superheated water condenses as its pressure drops when it emerges from the ground. The name solfatara, from the Italian solfo, "sulfur" (via the Sicilian language - compare to the volcano Solfatara), is given to fumaroles that emit sulfurous gases. Fumaroles may occur along tiny cracks or long fissures, in chaotic clusters or fields, and on the surfaces of lava flows and of thick deposits of pyroclastic flows
[...More...]

"Fumarolic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Acid
An acid is a molecule or ion capable of donating a hydron (proton or hydrogen ion H+), or, alternatively, capable of forming a covalent bond with an electron pair (a Lewis acid).[1] The first category of acids is the proton donors or Brønsted acids. In the special case of aqueous solutions, proton donors form the hydronium ion H3O+ and are known as Arrhenius acids. Brønsted and Lowry generalized the Arrhenius theory to include non-aqueous solvents. A Brønsted or Arrhenius acid usually contains a hydrogen atom bonded to a chemical structure that is still energetically favorable after loss of H+. Aqueous Arrhenius acids have characteristic properties which provide a practical description of an acid.[2] Acids form aqueous solutions with a sour taste, can turn blue litmus red, and react with bases and certain metals (like calcium) to form salts
[...More...]

"Acid" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rim (craters)
The rim or edge of a crater is the part that extends above the height of the local surface, usually in a circular or elliptical pattern. In a more specific sense, the rim may refer to the circular or elliptical edge that represents the uppermost tip of this raised portion
[...More...]

"Rim (craters)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mount Katmai
Mount Katmai
Mount Katmai
is a large stratovolcano (composite volcano) on the Alaska
Alaska
Peninsula in southern Alaska, located within Katmai National Park and Preserve. It is about 6.3 miles (10 km) in diameter with a central lake-filled caldera about 3 by 2 mi (4.5 by 3 km) in area, formed during the Novarupta
Novarupta
eruption of 1912. The caldera rim reaches a maximum elevation of 6,716 feet (2,047 m). In 1975 the surface of the crater lake was at an elevation of about 4,220 feet (1,286 m), and the estimated elevation of the caldera floor is about 3,400 ft (1,040 m)
[...More...]

"Mount Katmai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Precipitation (meteorology)
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
[...More...]

"Precipitation (meteorology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Groundwater
Groundwater
Groundwater
is the water present beneath Earth's surface in soil pore spaces and in the fractures of rock formations. A unit of rock or an unconsolidated deposit is called an aquifer when it can yield a usable quantity of water. The depth at which soil pore spaces or fractures and voids in rock become completely saturated with water is called the water table. Groundwater
Groundwater
is recharged from, and eventually flows to, the surface naturally; natural discharge often occurs at springs and seeps, and can form oases or wetlands. Groundwater
Groundwater
is also often withdrawn for agricultural, municipal, and industrial use by constructing and operating extraction wells
[...More...]

"Groundwater" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hot Spring
A hot spring is a spring produced by the emergence of geothermally heated groundwater that rises from the Earth's crust. While some of these springs contain water that is a safe temperature for bathing, others are so hot that immersion can result in injury or death.Contents1 Definitions 2 Sources of heat 3 Flow rates3.1 High flow hot springs4 Therapeutic uses 5 Biota in hot springs 6 Notable hot springs 7 Etiquette 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksDefinitions[edit]"Blood Pond" hot spring in Beppu, JapanThere is no universally accepted definition of a hot spring
[...More...]

"Hot Spring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.