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Coventry
Coventry
Coventry
(/ˈkɒvəntri/ ( listen)[4]) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands, England. Historically part of Warwickshire, Coventry
Coventry
is the 9th largest city in England
England
and the 12th largest in the United Kingdom.[5] It is the second largest city in the West Midlands region, after Birmingham, with a population of 345,385 in 2015.[6] Coventry
Coventry
is 19 miles (31 km) east-southeast of Birmingham, 24 miles (39 km) southwest of Leicester, 11 miles (18 km) north of Warwick
Warwick
and 95 miles (153 km) northwest of central London. Coventry Cathedral
Coventry Cathedral
was built after the destruction of the 14th century cathedral church of Saint Michael by the Luftwaffe in the Coventry Blitz
Coventry Blitz
of 14 November 1940
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Labour Party (UK)
The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom. It has been described as a broad church, bringing together an alliance of social democratic, democratic socialist and trade unionist outlooks.[9] The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights. Labour is a full member of the Party of European Socialists
Party of European Socialists
and Progressive Alliance, and holds observer status in the Socialist
Socialist
International. As of 2017, the party is considered the "largest party in Western Europe" in terms of party membership, with more than half-a-million members.[10] The Labour Party was founded in 1900, having grown out of the trade union movement and socialist parties of the nineteenth century
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Luftwaffe
The Luftwaffe[N 2] (German pronunciation: [ˈlʊftvafə] ( listen)) was the aerial warfare branch of the combined German Wehrmacht
Wehrmacht
military forces during World War II. Germany's military air arms during World War I, the Luftstreitkräfte of the Army and the Marine-Fliegerabteilung of the Navy, had been disbanded in May 1920 as a result of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles which stated that Germany was forbidden to have any air force. During the interwar period, German pilots were trained secretly in violation of the treaty at Lipetsk Air Base. With the rise of the Nazi Party and the repudiation of the Versailles Treaty, the Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
was officially established on 26 February 1935. The Condor Legion, a Luftwaffe
Luftwaffe
detachment sent to aid Nationalist forces in the Spanish Civil War, provided the force with a valuable testing ground for new doctrines and aircraft
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Central London
Central London
Central London
is the innermost part of London, in the United Kingdom, spanning several boroughs. Over time, a number of definitions have been used to define the scope of central London for statistics, urban planning and local government
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Nomenclature Of Territorial Units For Statistics
The Classification of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS; French: Nomenclature des unités territoriales statistiques) is a geocode standard for referencing the subdivisions of countries for statistical purposes.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The standard is developed and regulated by the European Union, and thus only covers the member states of the EU in detail. The Classification of Territorial Units for Statistics is instrumental in the European Union's Structural Fund
Structural Fund
delivery mechanisms and for locating the area where goods and services subject to European public procurement legislation are to be delivered. For each EU member country, a hierarchy of three NUTS levels is established by Eurostat
Eurostat
in agreement with each member state; the subdivisions in some levels do not necessarily correspond to administrative divisions within the country
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British National Grid Reference System
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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ONS Coding System
In the United Kingdom, the Office for National Statistics
Office for National Statistics
maintains a series of codes to represent a wide range of geographical areas of the UK, for use in tabulating census and other statistical data. These codes are referred to as ONS codes or GSS codes referring to the Government Statistical Service of which ONS is part. The previous hierarchical system of codes has been replaced as from January 2011[1] by a nine-character code for all types of geography, in which there is no relation between the code for a lower-tier area and the corresponding parent area
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ISO 3166-2
ISO 3166-2 is part of the ISO 3166 standard published by the International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO), and defines codes for identifying the principal subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states) of all countries coded in ISO 3166-1. The official name of the standard is Codes for the representation of names of countries and their subdivisions – Part 2: Country subdivision
Country subdivision
code. It was first published in 1998. The purpose of ISO 3166-2 is to establish an international standard of short and unique alphanumeric codes to represent the relevant administrative divisions and dependent territories of all countries in a more convenient and less ambiguous form than their full names
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Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
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British Summer Time
During British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST), civil time in the United Kingdom, Ireland
Ireland
and Portugal
Portugal
is advanced one hour forward of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) (in effect, changing the time zone from UTC+0 to UTC+1), so that evenings have more daylight and mornings have less.[1][2] BST begins at 01:00 GMT on the last Sunday of March and ends at 01:00 GMT (02:00 BST) on the last Sunday of October. Since 22 October 1995, the starting and finishing times of daylight saving time across the European Union
European Union
have been aligned[3] – for instance Central European Summer Time begins and ends on the same Sundays at exactly the same time (that is, 02:00 CET, which is 01:00 GMT)
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Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(DST), also daylight savings time or daylight time (United States) and summer time (United Kingdom, European Union, and others), is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn.[1] In effect, DST causes a lost hour of sleep in the spring and an extra hour of sleep in the fall.[2][3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation starting on April 30, 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then, particularly since the 1970s energy crisis
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UTC+0
UTC±00:00 is the following time: Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the basis for the world's civil time. Western European Time
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Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time
Time
(GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Today GMT is considered equivalent to UTC for UK civil purposes (but this is not formalised) and for navigation is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); these two meanings can differ by up to 0.9 s
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Office For National Statistics
The Office for National Statistics
Statistics
(ONS) is the executive office of the UK Statistics
Statistics
Authority, a non-ministerial department which reports directly to the UK Parliament.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Purpose and scope3.1 Applications of data4 Independence 5 Heads of the Office and the National Statistician 6 Work of the ONS6.1 Data collection 6.2 Former departments 6.3 The Blue Book 6.4 Education of Statisticians 6.5 Virtual Microdata Laboratory7 Office Locations7.1 Former Headquarters 7.2 Gradual move of functions to South Wales8 Criticism of the ONS 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksOverview[edit] It is charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the UK; responsibility for some areas of statistics in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales is devolved to the devolved governments for those areas
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Metropolitan Area
A metropolitan area is a region consisting of a densely populated urban core and its less-populated surrounding territories, sharing industry, infrastructure, and housing.[1] A metro area usually comprises multiple jurisdictions and municipalities: neighborhoods, townships, boroughs, cities, towns, exurbs, suburbs, counties, districts, states, and even nations like the eurodistricts. As social, economic and political institutions have changed, metropolitan areas have become key economic and political regions.[2] Metropolitan areas include satellite cities, towns and intervening rural areas that are socioeconomically tied to the urban core, typically measured by commuting patterns.[3] Most metropolitan areas are anchored by one major city such as Paris
Paris
metropolitan area (Paris) and New York metropolitan area
New York metropolitan area
(New York City)
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