HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Courtauld Institute Of Art
The Courtauld Institute of Art
Courtauld Institute of Art
(UK: /ˈkɔːrtoʊld/), commonly referred to as The Courtauld, is a self-governing college of the University of London
University of London
specialising in the study of the history of art and conservation
[...More...]

"Courtauld Institute Of Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Robert Adam
Robert Adam
Robert Adam
FRSE FRS FSA (Scot) FSA FRSA (3 July 1728 – 3 March 1792) was a Scottish neoclassical architect, interior designer and furniture designer. He was the son of William Adam (1689–1748), Scotland's foremost architect of the time, and trained under him. With his older brother John, Robert took on the family business, which included lucrative work for the Board of Ordnance, after William's death. In 1754, he left for Rome, spending nearly five years on the continent studying architecture under Charles-Louis Clérisseau
Charles-Louis Clérisseau
and Giovanni Battista Piranesi. On his return to Britain he established a practice in London, where he was joined by his younger brother James. Here he developed the "Adam Style", and his theory of "movement" in architecture, based on his studies of antiquity and became one of the most successful and fashionable architects in the country
[...More...]

"Robert Adam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mural
A mural is any piece of artwork painted or applied directly on a wall, ceiling or other permanent surface. A distinguishing characteristic of mural painting is that the architectural elements of the given space are harmoniously incorporated into the picture. Some wall paintings are painted on large canvases, which are then attached to the wall (e.g., with marouflage)
[...More...]

"Mural" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Art Museum
An art museum or art gallery is a building or space for the exhibition of art, usually visual art. Museums can be public or private, but what distinguishes a museum is the ownership of a collection
[...More...]

"Art Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Master's Degrees
A master's degree[fn 1] (from Latin
Latin
magister) is usually a second-cycle academic degree awarded by universities or colleges upon completion of a course of study demonstrating mastery or a high-order overview of a specific field of study or area of professional practice.[1] A master's degree normally requires previous study at the bachelor's level, either as a separate degree or as part of an integrated course
[...More...]

"Master's Degrees" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Architecture (built Environment)
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
[...More...]

"Architecture (built Environment)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Research Excellence Framework
The Research Excellence Framework is the successor to the Research Assessment Exercise. It is an Impact evaluation; assessing the research of British higher education institutions
[...More...]

"Research Excellence Framework" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Independent
The Independent
The Independent
is a British online newspaper.[2] Established in 1986 as an independent national morning newspaper published in London, it was controlled by Tony O'Reilly's Independent News & Media from 1997 until it was sold to Russian oligarch
[...More...]

"The Independent" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Guardian
The Guardian
The Guardian
is a British daily newspaper. It was known from 1821 until 1959 as the Manchester
Manchester
Guardian. Along with its sister papers The Observer and the Guardian Weekly, The Guardian
The Guardian
is part of the Guardian Media Group, owned by the Scott Trust
[...More...]

"The Guardian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

William Chambers (architect)
Sir William Chambers RA (23 February 1723 – 10 March 1796) was a Scottish-Swedish architect, based in London. Among his best-known works are Somerset House, London, and the pagoda at Kew. Chambers was a founder member of the Royal Academy. Biography[edit] William Chambers was born on 23 February 1723 in Gothenburg, Sweden, to a Scottish merchant father.[1][2] Between 1740 and 1749 he was employed by the Swedish East India Company making three voyages to China[3] where he studied Chinese architecture and decoration. Returning to Europe, he studied architecture in Paris (with J. F. Blondel) and spent five years in Italy. Then, in 1755, he moved to London, where he established an architectural practice
[...More...]

"William Chambers (architect)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Portman Square
Portman Square
Portman Square
is a square in London, part of the Portman Estate. It is located at the western end of Wigmore Street, which connects it to Cavendish Square
Cavendish Square
to its east.Portman Square, c.1830 (top left)It was built between 1765 and 1784 on land belonging to Henry William Portman. It included residences of Alexander Hamilton, 10th Duke of Hamilton, Sir Brook Bridges, 3rd Baronet, Henry Pelham-Clinton, 4th Duke of Newcastle-under-Lyne, George Keppel, 6th Earl of Albemarle, Sir Charles Asgill, 1st Baronet and William Henry Percy. Alexander Duff, 1st Duke of Fife maintained his London residence at No. 15 Portman Square. Notable houses[edit]Present-day Portman Square, displaying the unusual circulatory systemNo's 11-15 built in 1773-1776 by the famous architect James Wyatt in cooperation with his brother the builder Samuel Wyatt. First houses in which Coade stone was used
[...More...]

"Portman Square" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Public University
A public university is a university that is predominantly funded by public means through a national or subnational government, as opposed to private universities
[...More...]

"Public University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Home House
A house is a building that functions as a home. They can range from simple dwellings such as rudimentary huts of nomadic tribes and the improvised shacks in shantytowns to complex, fixed structures of wood, brick, concrete or other materials containing plumbing, ventilation, and electrical systems.[1][2] Houses use a range of different roofing systems to keep precipitation such as rain from getting into the dwelling space. Houses may have doors or locks to secure the dwelling space and protect its inhabitants and contents from burglars or other trespassers. Most conventional modern houses in Western cultures will contain one or more bedrooms and bathrooms, a kitchen or cooking area, and a living room. A house may have a separate dining room, or the eating area may be integrated into another room. Some large houses in North America have a recreation room
[...More...]

"Home House" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Illuminated Manuscript
An illuminated manuscript is a manuscript in which the text is supplemented with such decoration as initials, borders (marginalia) and miniature illustrations. In the strictest definition, the term refers only to manuscripts decorated with gold or silver; but in both common usage and modern scholarship, the term refers to any decorated or illustrated manuscript from Western traditions. Comparable Far Eastern and Mesoamerican works are described as painted. Islamic manuscripts may be referred to as illuminated, illustrated or painted, though using essentially the same techniques as Western works. This article covers the technical, social and economic history of the subject; for an art-historical account, see miniature. The earliest surviving substantive illuminated manuscripts are from the period 400 to 600, produced in the Kingdom of the Ostrogoths
Kingdom of the Ostrogoths
and the Eastern Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Illuminated Manuscript" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Arthur Lee, 1st Viscount Lee Of Fareham
A viscount (/ˈvaɪkaʊnt/ ( listen) VY-kownt, for male[1]) or viscountess (/ˈvaɪkaʊntɪs/, for female[2]) is a title used in certain European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey a lower-middling rank.[3] In many countries a viscount, and its historical equivalents, was a non-hereditary, administrative or judicial position, and did not develop into a hereditary title until much later.[4] In the case of French viscounts, it is customary to leave the title untranslated as vicomte [vi.kɔ̃t] and vicomtesse.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Early modern and contemporary usage3.1 Belgium 3.2 United Kingdom3.2.1 Ireland 3.2.2 Use as a courtesy title 3.2.3 Coronet3.3 Jersey 3.4 Portugal 3.5 Spain4 Equivalent titles4.1 Germanic counterparts 4.2 Non-Western counterparts5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word viscount comes from
[...More...]

"Arthur Lee, 1st Viscount Lee Of Fareham" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Engraving
Engraving
Engraving
is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface by cutting grooves into it. The result may be a decorated object in itself, as when silver, gold, steel, or glass are engraved, or may provide an intaglio printing plate, of copper or another metal, for printing images on paper as prints or illustrations; these images are also called engravings. Wood engraving
Wood engraving
is a form of relief printing and is not covered in this article. Engraving
Engraving
was a historically important method of producing images on paper in artistic printmaking, in mapmaking, and also for commercial reproductions and illustrations for books and magazines
[...More...]

"Engraving" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.