HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Courage
Courage
Courage
(also called bravery or valour) is the choice and willingness to confront agony, pain, danger, uncertainty, or intimidation. Physical courage is bravery in the face of physical pain, hardship, death or threat of death, while moral courage is the ability to act rightly in the face of popular opposition, shame, scandal, discouragement, or personal loss. The classical virtue of fortitude (andreia, fortitudo) is also translated "courage", but includes the aspects of perseverance and patience.[1] In the Western tradition, notable thoughts on courage have come from philosophers, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, and Kierkegaard; in the Eastern tradition, some thoughts on courage were offered by the Tao Te Ching
[...More...]

"Courage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bravery (other)
Bravery
Bravery
can mean:Bravery, the human condition to confront pain and fear The Bravery, a rock band from the U.S. The Bravery
Bravery
(album), the band's self-titled debut albumThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Bravery. If an interna
[...More...]

"Bravery (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Horror And Terror
The distinction between horror and terror is a standard literary and psychological concept applied especially to Gothic and horror fiction.[1] Terror is usually described as the feeling of dread and anticipation that precedes the horrifying experience. By contrast, horror is the feeling of revulsion that usually follows a frightening sight, sound, or otherwise experience. It is the feeling one gets after coming to an awful realization or experiencing a deeply unpleasant occurrence. In other words, horror is more related to being shocked or scared (being horrified), while terror is more related to being anxious or fearful.[2] Horror has also been defined as a combination of terror and revulsion.[3] The distinction between terror and horror was first characterized by the Gothic writer Ann Radcliffe
Ann Radcliffe
(1764–1823)
[...More...]

"Horror And Terror" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edmund Leighton
Edmund Blair Leighton (21 September 1852 – 1 September 1922) was an English painter of historical genre scenes, specializing in Regency and medieval subjects.Contents1 Biography 2 Obituary 3 List of works 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2016) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)God Speed! (1900)Leighton was the son of the artist Charles Blair Leighton. He was educated at University College School, before becoming a student at the Royal Academy
Royal Academy
Schools. He married Katherine Nash in 1885 and they went on to have a son and daughter. He exhibited annually at the Royal Academy from 1878 to 1920. Leighton was a fastidious craftsman, producing highly finished, decorative pictures, displaying romanticized scenes with a popular appeal
[...More...]

"Edmund Leighton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Depression (mood)
Depression is a state of low mood and aversion to activity that can affect a person's thoughts, behavior, feelings, and sense of well-being. A depressed mood is a normal temporary reaction to life events such as loss of a loved one. It is also a symptom of some physical diseases and a side effect of some drugs and medical treatments. Depressed mood is also a symptom of some mood disorders such as major depressive disorder or dysthymia.[1] People with a depressed mood may be notably sad, anxious, or empty; they may also feel notably hopeless, helpless, dejected, or worthless. Other symptoms expressed may include senses of guilt, irritability, or anger.[2][3] Further feelings expressed by these individuals may include feeling ashamed or an expressed restlessness. These individuals may notably lose interest in activities that they once considered pleasurable or experience either loss of appetite or overeating
[...More...]

"Depression (mood)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Joy
The word joy means a feeling of great pleasure and happiness.[1] C. S. Lewis
C. S. Lewis
saw clear distinction between joy and pleasure and happiness; "I sometimes wonder whether all pleasures are not substitutes for Joy."[2], and "I call it Joy, which is here a technical term and must be sharply distinguished both from Happiness and Pleasure. Joy
Joy
(in my sense) has indeed one characteristic, and one only, in common with them; the fact that anyone who has experienced it will want it again... I doubt whether anyone who has tasted it would ever, if both were in his power, exchange it for all the pleasures in the world. But then Joy
Joy
is never in our power and Pleasure
Pleasure
often is."[3] The causes of joy have been ascribed to various sources
[...More...]

"Joy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Anticipation
Anticipation
Anticipation
is an emotion involving pleasure, excitement, or anxiety in considering an expected event.[attribution needed] Anticipation
Anticipation
is the process of imaginative speculation about the future. The brain uses information about gravity, curvature, obstacles etc. to make a prediction.Contents1 As a defence mechanism 2 Desire 3 In music 4 In phenomenology 5 In pop culture 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksAs a defence mechanism[edit] Robin Skynner considered anticipation as one of "the mature ways of dealing with real stress...
[...More...]

"Anticipation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fear
Fear
Fear
is a feeling induced by perceived danger or threat that occurs in certain types of organisms, which causes a change in metabolic and organ functions and ultimately a change in behavior, such as fleeing, hiding, or freezing from perceived traumatic events. Fear
Fear
in human beings may occur in response to a specific stimulus occurring in the present, or in anticipation or expectation of a future threat perceived as a risk to body or life. The fear response arises from the perception of danger leading to confrontation with or escape from/avoiding the threat (also known as the fight-or-flight response), which in extreme cases of fear (horror and terror) can be a freeze response or paralysis. In humans and animals, fear is modulated by the process of cognition and learning. Thus fear is judged as rational or appropriate and irrational or inappropriate. An irrational fear is called a phobia. Psychologists such as John B
[...More...]

"Fear" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Frustration
In psychology, frustration is a common emotional response to opposition, related to anger, annoyance and disappointment, frustration arises from the perceived resistance to the fulfillment of an individual's will or goal[1] and is likely to increase when a will or goal is denied or blocked. There are two types of frustration; internal and external. Internal frustration may arise from challenges in fulfilling personal goals, desires, instinctual drives and needs, or dealing with perceived deficiencies, such as a lack of confidence or fear of social situations. Conflict, such as when one has competing goals that interfere with one another, can also be an internal source of frustration and can create cognitive dissonance
[...More...]

"Frustration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gratitude
Gratitude, thankfulness, thanksgiving[1], or gratefulness, from the Latin gratus ‘pleasing, thankful’,[2] is a feeling of appreciation felt by and/or similar positive response shown by the recipient of kindness, gifts, help, favors, or other types of generosity, towards the giver of such gifts.[3] The experience of gratitude has historically been a focus of several world religions.[4] It has also been a topic of interest to ancient, medieval and modern philosophers, and continues to engage contemporary western philosophers.[5] The systematic study of gratitude within psychology only began around the year 2000, possibly because psychology traditionally focused more on understanding distress than on understanding positive emotions
[...More...]

"Gratitude" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Grief
Grief
Grief
is a multifaceted response to loss, particularly to the loss of someone or something that has died, to which a bond or affection was formed. Although conventionally focused on the emotional response to loss, it also has physical, cognitive, behavioral, social, cultural, spiritual and philosophical dimensions. While the terms are often used interchangeably, bereavement refers to the state of loss, and grief is the reaction to that loss. Grief
Grief
is a natural response to loss
[...More...]

"Grief" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Guilt (emotion)
Guilt is a cognitive or an emotional experience that occurs when a person believes or realizes—accurately or not—that he or she has compromised his or her own standards of conduct or has violated a universal moral standard and bears significant responsibility for that violation.[1] Guilt is closely related to the concept of remorse.Contents1 Psychology1.1 Defenses 1.2 Behavioral responses 1.3 Lack of guilt in psychopaths 1.4 Causes1.4.1 Evolutionary theories 1.4.2 Social psychology theories 1.4.3 Other theories2 Collective guilt 3 Cultural views3.1 Etymology 3.2 In literature 3.3 In the Christian Bible4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksPsychology[edit] Guilt is an important factor in perpetuating obsessive–compulsive disorder symptoms.[2] Guilt and its associated causes, merits, and demerits are common themes in psychology and psychiatry
[...More...]

"Guilt (emotion)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Happiness
In psychology, happiness is a mental or emotional state of well-being which can be defined by, among others, positive or pleasant emotions ranging from contentment to intense joy.[1] Happy mental states may reflect judgements by a person about their overall well-being.[2] Since the 1960s, happiness research has been conducted in a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including gerontology, social psychology, clinical and medical research and happiness economics. In philosophy, happiness is translated from the Greek concept of eudaimonia, and refers to the good life, or flourishing, as opposed to an emotion.Contents1 Definition 2 Philosophy 3 Religion3.1 Eastern religions3.1.1 Buddhism 3.1.2 Hinduism 3.1.3 Confucianism3.2 Abrahamic religions3.2.1 Judaism 3.2.2 Roman Catholicism3.3 Islam4 Psychology4.1 Theories4.1.1 Maslow's hierarchy of needs 4.1.2 Self-determination theory 4.1.3 Positive psychology4.2 Measu
[...More...]

"Happiness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hatred
Hatred or hate is a deep and extreme emotional dislike, especially invoking feelings of anger or resentment. It can be directed against individuals, groups, entities, objects, behaviors, or ideas. Hatred is often associated with feelings of anger, disgust and a disposition towards hostility.Contents1 Ethnolinguistics 2 Psychoanalytic views 3 Neurological research 4 Legal issues 5 Religious perspectives5.1 Christianity6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingEthnolinguistics[edit]This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (August 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research
[...More...]

"Hatred" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hope
Hope
Hope
is an optimistic state of mind that is based on an expectation of positive outcomes with respect to events and circumstances in one's life or the world at large.[1] As a verb, its definitions include: "expect with confidence" and "to cherish a desire with anticipation".[2] Among its opposites are dejection, hopelessness and despair.[3]Contents1 In psychology1.1 Hope
Hope
theory2 In healthcare2.1 Background 2.2 Major theories 2.3 Major empirical findings 2.4 Applications 2.5 Impediments 2.6 Benefits3 In culture 4 In management 5 In literature5.1 Symbolism6 In mythology 7 In religion7.1 Christianity 7.2 Hinduism8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksIn psychology[edit]Hope, which lay at the bottom of the box, remained
[...More...]

"Hope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humiliation
Humiliation
Humiliation
is the abasement of pride, which creates mortification or leads to a state of being humbled or reduced to lowliness or submission. It is an emotion felt by a person whose social status, either by force or willingly, has just decreased.[1] It can be brought about through intimidation, physical or mental mistreatment or trickery, or by embarrassment if a person is revealed to have committed a socially or legally unacceptable act
[...More...]

"Humiliation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.