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County Of London
The COUNTY OF LONDON was a county of England from 1889 to 1965, corresponding to the area known today as Inner London . It was created as part of the general introduction of elected county government in England, by way of the Local Government Act 1888 . The Act created an administrative County of London, which included within its territory the City of London . However, the City of London and the County of London formed separate ceremonial counties for "non-administrative " purposes. The local authority for the county was the London County Council (LCC), which initially performed only a limited range of functions, but gained further powers during its 76-year existence. The LCC provided very few services within the City of London, where the ancient Corporation monopolised local governance. In 1900 the lower-tier civil parishes and district boards were replaced with 28 new metropolitan boroughs. The territory of the county was 74,903 acres (303.12 km2) in 1961. During its existence there was a long-term decline in population as more residents moved into the outer suburbs; there were periodic reviews of the local government structures in the greater London area and several failed attempts to expand the boundaries of the county. In 1965, the London Government Act 1963 replaced the county with the much larger Greater London administrative area
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London County (other)
LONDON COUNTY may refer to: * Greater London , England, a present-day county * City of London
City of London
, England, a city-county, and enclave of Greater London * County of London , England, a former county * London County Cricket Club , a short-lived English cricket clubSEE ALSO * London (other) This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title LONDON COUNTY. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=London_County additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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Counties Of England
COUNTIES OF ENGLAND are areas used for the purposes of administrative, geographical, cultural or political demarcation. For administrative purposes, England outside Greater London and the Isles of Scilly is divided into 83 metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties . These counties may consist of a single district or be divided into several districts. As of April 2009, 27 of these counties are divided into districts and have a county council . Six of the counties, covering the major conurbations , are known as metropolitan counties , which do not have county councils, although some functions are organised on a county-wide basis by their districts (metropolitan boroughs ) acting jointly. All of England (including Greater London and the Isles of Scilly) is also divided into 48 ceremonial counties , which are also known as geographic counties. Most ceremonial counties correspond to a metropolitan or non-metropolitan county of the same name but often with reduced boundaries. The current arrangement is the result of incremental reform. Many of the counties have their origins in the Middle Ages , although the larger counties of Yorkshire and Sussex lost many or all of their administrative functions centuries ago. The geographic counties which existed before the local government reforms of 1965 and 1974 are referred to as ancient counties or historic counties
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Metropolitan Board Of Works
The METROPOLITAN BOARD OF WORKS (MBW) was the principal instrument of London
London
-wide government from December 1855 until the establishment of the London County Council
London County Council
in March 1889. Its principal responsibility was to provide infrastructure to cope with London's rapid growth, which it accomplished. The MBW was an appointed rather than elected body. This lack of accountability made it unpopular with Londoners, especially in its latter years when it fell prey to corruption . CONTENTS * 1 Background * 2 Creation * 3 Activities * 3.1 Sewage * 3.2 Streets and bridges * 3.3 Embankment * 3.4 Fire brigade * 3.5 Parks and open spaces * 4 Organisation * 5 Scandals * 5.1 Subsidiary corruption * 5.2 Royal Commission * 6 Abolition * 7 Chairmen of the Metropolitan Board of Works
Metropolitan Board of Works
* 8 See also * 9 References BACKGROUNDLondon's growth had rapidly accelerated with the increase in railway commuting from the 1830s onwards. However, its local government was chaotic, with hundreds of authorities having varying fields of responsibility and overlapping geographic boundaries. Providing a specific service in a given area might need the co-ordination of many of these authorities. In 1835 elected municipal boroughs had been set up covering every major city except London
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Greater London
LONDON, or GREATER LONDON, is a county and region of England which forms the administrative boundaries of London . It is organised into 33 local government districts : the 32 London boroughs (which makes up the ceremonial county of Greater London) and the City of London (which is a separate county but still part of the region). The Greater London Authority , based in Southwark , is responsible for strategic local government across the region and consists of the Mayor of London and the London Assembly . The county of Greater London was created on 1 April 1965 through the London Government Act 1963 . Administratively, Greater London was first established as a _sui generis _ council area under the Greater London Council between 1963 and 1986. The area was re-established as a region in 1994, and the Greater London Authority formed in 2000. The region covers 1,572 km2 (607 sq mi) and had a population of 8,174,000 at the 2011 census. In 2012, it had the highest GVA per capita in the United Kingdom at £37,232. The Greater London Built-up Area —used in some national statistics—is a measure of the continuous urban area of London, and therefore includes areas outside of the administrative region
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Administrative Counties Of England
ADMINISTRATIVE COUNTIES were a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government from 1889 to 1974. They were created by the Local Government Act 1888 as the areas for which county councils were elected. Some large counties were divided into several administrative counties, each with its own county council. The administrative counties were abolished by the Local Government Act 1972 and were replaced by the metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties of England . CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Introduction of county councils * 1.2 Map 1890–1965 * 1.3 Area and population * 1.4 Alterations in boundaries * 1.5 Greater London
Greater London
* 1.6 Map 1965–1974 * 2 Abolition * 3 See also * 4 References * 5 External links HISTORYThe administrative counties did not exist prior to 1889, see historic counties of England for the history of the English counties before then. INTRODUCTION OF COUNTY COUNCILS Main article: Local Government Act 1888 In 1888 the government, led by the Tory prime minister Lord Salisbury established county councils throughout England and Wales
England and Wales
, covering areas known as administrative counties . Many larger towns and cities were given the status of county borough , with similar powers and independent of county council control. Under the Act, each county borough was an "administrative county of itself"
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Ceremonial Counties Of England
The CEREMONIAL COUNTIES, also referred to as the LIEUTENANCY AREAS OF ENGLAND, are areas of England to which a Lord Lieutenant is appointed. Legally the areas in England, as well as in Wales and Scotland, are defined by the Lieutenancies Act 1997 as COUNTIES AND AREAS FOR THE PURPOSES OF THE LIEUTENANCIES IN GREAT BRITAIN, in contrast to the areas used for local government . They are also informally known as GEOGRAPHIC COUNTIES, as often representing more permanent features of English geography, and to distinguish them from counties of England which have a present-day administrative function. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Shrieval counties * 3 Definition * 3.1 Ceremonial counties since 1997 * 4 Lieutenancy areas in 1890 * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 Notes * 8 External links HISTORY Ceremonial counties before the creation of Greater London in 1965 (showing counties corporate as part of the main counties.) The distinction between a county for purposes of the Lieutenancy and a county for administrative purposes is not a new one: in some cases a county corporate that was part of a county was appointed its own Lieutenant (although the Lieutenant of the containing county would often be appointed to this position as well), and the three Ridings of Yorkshire had been treated as three counties for Lieutenancy purposes since the 17th century
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London County Council
LONDON COUNTY COUNCIL (LCC) was the principal local government body for the County of London throughout its existence from 1889 to 1965, and the first London-wide general municipal authority to be directly elected. It covered the area today known as Inner London and was replaced by the Greater London Council . The LCC was the largest, most significant and most ambitious English municipal authority of its day. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Powers and duties * 2.1 Housing Reform * 2.2 Street Re-Naming * 2.3 World War II Era * 3 Headquarters * 3.1 Spring Gardens * 3.2 Search for a new site * 3.3 County Hall, Lambeth * 4 Politics * 4.1 Elections to the London County Council * 4.2 Political control * 4.3 Leaders of the London County Council * 4.4 Chairmen of the London County Council * 4.4.1 Chairman and vice chairman * 4.4.2 Deputy chairman * 5 Abolition * 6 See also * 7 References HISTORY _ The First Meeting of the London County Council in the County Hall Spring Gardens, 1889_ by Henry Jamyn Brooks By the 19th century the City of London Corporation covered only a small fraction of metropolitan London. From 1855 the Metropolitan Board of Works (MBW) had certain powers across the metropolis, but it was appointed rather than elected
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Administrative Centre
An ADMINISTRATIVE CENTRE is a seat of regional administration or local government , or a county town , or the place where the central administration of a commune is located. In countries which have French as one of their administrative languages (such as Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland or many African countries) and in some other countries (such as Italy, cf. cognate _capoluogo_), a CHEF-LIEU (French pronunciation: ​ , plural form _chefs-lieux_ (literally "chief place" or "head place"), is a town or city that is pre-eminent from an administrative perspective. The ‘f’ in chef-lieu is pronounced, in contrast to chef-d'oeuvre where it is mute. CONTENTS * 1 Algeria * 2 Belgium * 3 Luxembourg * 4 France
France
* 5 Jordan
Jordan
* 6 New Caledonia * 7 Francophone West Africa * 8 Russia
Russia
* 9 Switzerland * 10 Tunisia * 11 United Kingdom
United Kingdom
* 12 Popular culture * 13 See also * 14 References ALGERIAThe capital of an Algerian Province is called a CHEF-LIEU. The capital of a district , the next largest division, is also called a CHEF-LIEU. While the capital of the lowest division, the municipalities , is called AGGLOMERATION DE CHEF-LIEU (chef-lieu agglomeration ) and is abbreviated as A.C.L. BELGIUMThe CHEF-LIEU in Belgium is the administrative centre of each of the ten Provinces of Belgium
Provinces of Belgium

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County Hall, London
COUNTY HALL (sometimes called LONDON COUNTY HALL) is a building in London
London
that was the headquarters of London
London
County Council (LCC) and later the Greater London
London
Council (GLC). The building is on the South Bank of the River Thames
River Thames
, with Westminster Bridge being next to it, heading south. It faces west toward the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
and is close to the Palace of Westminster
Palace of Westminster
. The nearest London
London
Underground stations are Waterloo and Westminster . Today, County Hall is the site of businesses and attractions, including the London
London
Sea Life Aquarium , London
London
Dungeon and a Namco Station amusement arcade. The London
London
Eye is next to County Hall, and its visitor centre is inside the building. There is also a suite of exhibition rooms which was home to the Saatchi Gallery from 2003 to 2006. Other parts of the building house two hotels (a budget Premier Inn "> County Hall The main six storey building was designed by Ralph Knott . It is faced in Portland stone
Portland stone
in an Edwardian Baroque style
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Civil Parishes In England
In England, a CIVIL PARISH is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties , or their combined form, the unitary authority . It is an administrative parish , in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish . A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch . Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council . Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish. As of 31 December 2015 there were 10,449 parishes in England. On 1 April 2014, Queen\'s Park became the first civil parish in Greater London . Before 2008 their creation was not permitted within a London borough
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District (Metropolis)
The METROPOLIS MANAGEMENT ACT 1855 (18 -webkit-column-count: 2; column-count: 2;"> * City of London * Bermondsey * Bethnal Green * Camberwell * (and 5a) Chelsea * Clerkenwell * Fulham District * Greenwich
Greenwich
District * Hackney District * Hampstead * Holborn District * Islington * Kensington * Lambeth * (and 15a) Lewisham
Lewisham
District * Limehouse District * Mile End Old Town * Newington * Paddington * Plumstead District * Poplar District * Rotherhithe * St George Hanover Square * St George in the East * St Giles District * St Luke * St Martin the Fields * St Marylebone * St Olave District * St Pancras * St Saviours District * Shoreditch * Southwark St George the Martyr * (and 34a) Strand District * (and 35a) Wandsworth
Wandsworth
District * (and 36a) Westminster District * Westminster St James * Whitechapel District * Woolwich The following were detached parts of parishes and districts:5a Kensal Green ; 15a Penge Hamlet; 34a St Anne ; 35a detached portion of Streatham parish; 36a Kensington Palace Not shown is Clerkenwell Detached, an exclave of that parish within Hornsey , Middlesex
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Metropolitan Boroughs Of The County Of London
The term METROPOLITAN BOROUGH was used from 1900 to 1965 , for the subdivisions of the County of London and were created by the London Government Act 1899 . CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 List of boroughs * 3 References * 4 Further reading HISTORYParliamentary boroughs covering the metropolitan area were created in 1832. They were Finsbury, Greenwich, Lambeth, Marylebone, Southwark, Tower Hamlets and Westminster. Soon after their creation it was proposed that they should be incorporated for local government purposes and this was also a finding of the Royal Commission on the City of London
City of London
, but this did not happen. The metropolitan boroughs were created in 1900 by the London Government Act 1899 which created 28 metropolitan boroughs as sub-divisions of the County of London . Their borough councils replaced vestries and district boards as the second tier of local government. Some boroughs were formed as amalgamations of parishes, but most were continuations of existing units of local government with the parish vestry or district board elevated to a borough council. With the creation of the boroughs, the opportunity was taken to correct a number of boundary anomalies. All civil parishes in the County of London, continued to exist, although their role was reduced to administration of the New Poor Law and they were amalgamated over time to become aligned with the boroughs
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Inner London
INNER LONDON is the name for the group of London boroughs which form the interior part of Greater London and are surrounded by Outer London . With its origins in the Bills of mortality , it became fixed as an area for statistics in 1847 and was used as an area of local government from 1855 to 1965. It now has two common definitions. The first is the statutory definition delineated in the London Government Act 1963 , coming into force on 1 April 1965, comprising twelve Inner London boroughs and almost identical to the County of London that was abolished at the same time. The second is the current definition used by the Office for National Statistics comprising eleven of the statutory Inner London boroughs and two of the statutory Outer London boroughs, and the City of London . Inner London is smaller than Outer London both in terms of population and area, but the density of population is more than double that of Outer London. Inner London is officially the wealthiest area in Europe with the most expensive street in Europe, GDP per capita is more than €80,000 while the UK GDP per capita is around €27,000. Many of the world's wealthiest people live in Inner London, but there is also widespread poverty. Central London is located at the core of Inner London
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Local Government Act 1888
The LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1888 (51 -webkit-column-width: 30em; column-width: 30em; list-style-type: decimal;"> * ^ Order of the President of the Local Government Board, 19 March 1889 (Printed in The Times, 21 March 1889) * ^ B. Keith-Lucas, Government of the County in England, The Western Political Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 1. (March 1956), pp. 44-55. * ^ Amendment by Walter Barttelot , MP for Horsham, 13 July 1888 (The Times, 14 July 1888) * ^ Amendment by Captain Selwyn, 13 July 1888 (The Times, 14 July 1888) * ^ Amendment by Lord Bristol, 6 August 1888 (The Times, 7 August 1888) * ^ Amendment by Lord Exeter, 6 August 1888 (The Times, 7 August 1888) * ^ Davis, J., Reforming London, (1988) * ^ Section 59 * ^ Section 59(a) * ^ A B C D Section 31 * ^ Section 32 * ^ Section 59(b) * ^ Local Government Board's Provisional Order Confirmation (No.2) Act 1889 (52 & 53 Vict. C.clxxvii) * ^ "Urban Sanitary Authorities". The County Companion Diary, Statistical Chronicle and Magisterial and Official Directory. London: Waterlow & Sons Ltd. 1882. p. vii. * ^ Youngs, Frederic A, Jr. (1979). Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol.I: Southern England. London: Royal Historical Society . pp. 556–707. ISBN 0-901050-67-9 . * ^ Youngs, Frederic A, Jr. (1991). Guide to the Local Administrative Units of England, Vol.2: Northern England. London: Royal Historical Society . pp. 635–794. ISBN 0-86193-127-0
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City Of London
The CITY OF LONDON is a city and county that contains the historic centre and central business district of London
London
. It constituted most of London
London
from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages , but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London
London
, though it remains a notable part of central London
London
. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London
London
; however, the City of London
London
is not a London
London
borough , a status reserved for the other 32 districts (including London's only other city, the City of Westminster ). The City of London
London
is widely referred to simply as THE CITY (differentiated from the phrase "the city of