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County Of London
The County of London
County of London
was a county of England from 1889 to 1965, corresponding to the area known today as Inner London. It was created as part of the general introduction of elected county government in England, by way of the Local Government Act 1888. The Act created an administrative County of London, which included within its territory the City of London. However, the City of London
City of London
and the County of London formed separate ceremonial counties for "non-administrative" purposes.[1] The local authority for the county was the London County Council (LCC), which initially performed only a limited range of functions, but gained further powers during its 76-year existence. The LCC provided very few services within the City of London, where the ancient Corporation monopolised local governance.[1] In 1900 the lower-tier civil parishes and district boards were replaced with 28 new metropolitan boroughs
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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London Borough Of Tower Hamlets
31.2% White British 1.5% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 12.4% Other White 1.1% White & Black Caribbean 0.6% White & Black African 1.2% White & Asian 1.2% Other Mixed 2.7% Indian 1% Pakistani 32% Bangladeshi 3.2% Chinese 2.3% Other Asian 3.7% Black African 2.1% Black Caribbean 1.5% Other Black 1% Arab 1.3% OtherTime zone GMT (UTC) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcodes E, ECONS code 00BGGSS code E09000030Police Metropolitan PoliceWebsite http://www.towerhamlets.gov.uk/The London Borough of Tower Hamlets ( pronunciation (help·info)) is a London Borough in East London which covers much of the traditional East End. The Borough was formed in 1965 from the merger of the former Metropolitan Boroughs of Stepney, Poplar and Bethnal Green
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Hampstead Heath
Coordinates: 51°33′37″N 0°9′39″W / 51.56028°N 0.16083°W / 51.56028; -0.16083 Hampstead
Hampstead
Heath (locally known simply as the Heath) is a large, ancient London
London
park, covering 320 hectares (790 acres).[1] This grassy public space sits astride a sandy ridge, one of the highest points in London, running from Hampstead
Hampstead
to Highgate, which rests on a band of London
London
Clay.[2] The heath is rambling and hilly, embracing ponds, recent and ancient woodlands, a lido, playgrounds, and a training track, and it adjoins the former stately home of Kenwood House
Kenwood House
and its estate
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London Basin
The London Basin is an elongated, roughly triangular sedimentary basin approximately 250 kilometres (160 mi) long which underlies London and a large area of south east England, south eastern East Anglia and the adjacent North Sea. The basin formed as a result of compressional tectonics related to the Alpine orogeny during the Palaeogene period and was mainly active between 40 and 60 million years ago.Contents1 Boundaries and shape1.1 Spatial boundaries 1.2 Geological boundaries2 Tectonic history 3 Sedimentary infill and stratigraphy 4 Geography4.1 Drainage 4.2 Settlements5 References5.1 LiteratureBoundaries and shape[edit] Spatial boundaries[edit] The generally accepted boundaries are the Late Cretaceous Chalk Group's escarpments of the Chilterns and Marlborough Downs to the north and the North Downs and Berkshire Downs to the south. To the south lie the Weald and Salisbury Plain and to the north is the Vale of Aylesbury
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General Register Office
General Register Office
General Register Office
(GRO) is the name given to the civil registry in England and Wales, Scotland, many other Commonwealth
Commonwealth
nations and Ireland. As such, the GRO is the government agency responsible for the recording of vital records such as births, deaths, and marriages. The director of a General Register Office
General Register Office
is titled Registrar General. Examples[edit] General Register Office
General Register Office
for England and Wales: The post of registrar general was created by the Births and Deaths Registration Act 1836, and registration began in 1837. The first holder of the post was Thomas Henry Lister. The registrar general was soon given other responsibilities, such as the conduct of every census in England and Wales since 1841, and eventually came to be head of a primarily statistical organisation
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Decline In Population
A population decline (or depopulation) in humans is any great reduction in a human population such as long-term demographic trends, as in sub-replacement fertility, urban decay, white flight or rural flight, or due to violence, disease, or other catastrophes.[1]Contents1 Causes 2 Underpopulation 3 Changing trends 4 Interpretation of statistical data 5 Contemporary decline by nation or territory 6 Long-term trends6.1 United States 6.2 Japan 6.3 Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
and former Soviet republics6.3.1 Albania 6.3.2 Armenia 6.3.3 Belarus 6.3.4 Bosnia and Herzegovina 6.3.5 Bulgaria 6.3.6 Croatia 6.3.
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London Borough Of Wandsworth
53.3% White British 2.5% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 15.5% Other White 1.5% White & Black Caribbean 0.7% White & Black African 1.3% White & Asian 1.5% Other Mixed 2.8% Indian 3.2% Pakistani 0.5% Bangladeshi 1.2% Chinese 3.2% Other Asian 4.8% Black African 4% Black Caribbean 1.8% Other Black 0.8% Arab 1.3% OtherTime zone GMT (UTC) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcodes SWArea code(s) 020ONS code 00BJGSS code E09000032Police Metropolitan PoliceWebsite www.wandsworth.gov.ukThe London
London
Borough of Wandsworth /ˈwɒndzwɜːrθ/ ( listen) is a London borough
London borough
in England, and forms part of Inner London
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Vestry
A vestry was a committee for the local secular and ecclesiastical government for a parish in England and Wales, which originally met in the vestry or sacristy of the parish church, and consequently became known colloquially as the "vestry". For many centuries they were the sole civil government of rural areas. At the high point of their powers, just prior to removal of Poor Law responsibilities in 1834, the vestries spent not far short of one-fifth of the budget of the national government itself. Their secular and ecclesiastical duties were separated in 1894 under local government reforms in 1894. Their ecclesiastical duties have been performed by Parochial Church Councils since 1921
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London Borough Of Southwark
39.7% White British 2.2% White Irish 0.1% White Gypsy or Irish Traveller 12.3% Other White 2% White & Black Caribbean 1.3% White & Black African 1% White & Asian 1.9% Other Mixed 2% Indian 0.6% Pakistani 1.4% Bangladeshi 2.8% Chinese 2.7% Other Asian 16.4% Black African 6.2% Black Caribbean 4.2% Other Black 0.8% Arab 2.4% OtherTime zone GMT (UTC) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcodes SEONS code 00BEGSS code E09000028Police Metropolitan PoliceWebsite http://www.southwark.gov.uk/The London
London
Borough of Southwark
Southwark
/ˈsʌðərk/ ( listen)[2] in south London, England
England
forms part of Inner London
Inner London
and is connected by bridges across the River Thames
River Thames
to the City of London
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Civil Parishes In England
In England, a civil parish is a territorial designation which is the lowest tier of local government below districts and counties, or their combined form, the unitary authority. It is an administrative parish, in contrast to an ecclesiastical parish. A civil parish can range in size from a large town with a population of about 80,000 to a single village with fewer than a hundred inhabitants. In a limited number of cases a parish might include a whole city where city status has been granted by the Monarch. Reflecting this diverse nature, a civil parish may be known as a town, village, neighbourhood or community by resolution of its parish council. Approximately 35% of the English population live in a civil parish
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County Hall, London
County Hall (sometimes called London
London
County Hall) is a building in London
London
that was the headquarters of London
London
County Council (LCC) and later the Greater London
London
Council (GLC). The building is on the South Bank of the River Thames, with Westminster Bridge
Westminster Bridge
being next to it, heading south. It faces west toward the City of Westminster
City of Westminster
and is close to the Palace of Westminster. The nearest London
London
Underground stations are Waterloo and Westminster. Today, County Hall is the site of businesses and attractions, including the London
London
Sea Life Aquarium, London
London
Dungeon and a Namco Station amusement arcade
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Administrative Centre
An administrative centre is a seat of regional administration or local government, or a county town, or the place where the central administration of a commune is located. In countries which have French as one of their administrative languages (such as Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland or many African countries) and in some other countries (such as Italy, cf. cognate capoluogo), a chef-lieu (French pronunciation: ​[ʃɛfljø], plural form chefs-lieux (literally "chief place" or "head place"), is a town or city that is pre-eminent from an administrative perspective. The ‘f’ in chef-lieu is pronounced, in contrast to chef-d'oeuvre where it is mute.Contents1 Algeria 2 Belgium 3 Luxembourg 4 France 5 Jordan 6 New Caledonia 7 Francophone West Africa 8 Russia 9 Switzerland 10 Tunisia 11 United Kingdom 12 Popular culture 13 See also 14 ReferencesAlgeria[edit] The capital of an Algerian Province is called a chef-lieu
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Metropolitan Borough Of Camberwell
Metropolitan
Metropolitan
may refer to:Look up metropolitan in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.Contents1 In geography1.1 Named places2 Businesses 3 Transport3.1 Transit systems 3.2 Vehicles4 Colleges and Universities 5 Media and entertainment5.1 Journalism and literature 5.2 Performing arts6 Other uses 7 See alsoIn geography[edit]Metropolis, a large city or conurbation Metropolitan
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London School Board
The School Board for London (known colloquially as the London School Board and often abbreviated to the LSB) was an institution of local government and the first directly elected body covering the whole of London. The Elementary Education Act 1870
Elementary Education Act 1870
was the first to provide for education for the whole population of England and Wales. It created elected school boards, which had power to build and run schools where there were insufficient voluntary school places; they could also compel attendance
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Metropolitan Asylums Board
The Metropolitan Asylums Board (or MAB) was established under Poor Law legislation, to deal with London's sick poor. It was established by the Metropolitan Poor Act 1867
Metropolitan Poor Act 1867
and was wound up in 1930, its functions being transferred to the London
London
County Council. The Act was passed following a campaign by Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
and Edwin Chadwick
Edwin Chadwick
and the health section of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science and some well publicised deaths of paupers in workhouses
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