HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Country Dance
A country dance is any of a large number of social dances of the British Isles in which couples dance together in a figure or "set", each dancer dancing to his or her partner and each couple dancing to the other couples in the set.[1] A set consists most commonly of two or three couples, sometimes four and rarely five or six. Often dancers follow a "caller" who names each change in the figures. Introduced to France and then Germany and Italy in the course of the 17th century, country dances gave rise to the contradanse, one of the significant dance forms in classical music. Introduced to America by French immigrants, it remains popular in the United States as contra dance and had great influence upon Latin American music as contradanza. The Anglais (from the French word meaning "English") or Angloise is another term for the English country dance.[2][3] A Scottish country dance
Scottish country dance
may be termed an Ecossaise
[...More...]

"Country Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Raoul Auger Feuillet
Raoul Auger (or Anger) Feuillet (c.1660–1710) was a French dance notator, publisher and choreographer most well-known today for his Chorégraphie, ou l'art de décrire la danse (Paris, 1700)[1] which described Beauchamp-Feuillet notation, and his subsequent collections of ballroom and theatrical dances, which included his own choreographies as well as those of Pécour. His Chorégraphie (1700) was translated into English by John Weaver (as Orchesography. Or the Art of Dancing)[2] and P. Siris (as The Art of Dancing), both published in 1706
[...More...]

"Raoul Auger Feuillet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Swedish Language
Swedish ( svenska (help·info) [²svɛnːska]) is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 9.6 million people, predominantly in Sweden
Sweden
(as the sole official language), and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with Finnish. It is largely mutually intelligible with Norwegian and to some extent with Danish, although the degree of mutual intelligibility is largely dependent on the dialect and accent of the speaker. Both Norwegian and Danish are generally easier to read than to listen to because of difference in accent and tone when speaking. Swedish is a descendant of Old Norse, the common language of the Germanic peoples
Germanic peoples
living in Scandinavia during the Viking Era
[...More...]

"Swedish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Playford
John Playford
John Playford
(1623–1686/7) was a London bookseller, publisher, minor composer, and member of the Stationers' Company, who published books on music theory, instruction books for several instruments, and psalters with tunes for singing in churches. He is perhaps best known today for his publication of The English Dancing Master in 1651.Contents1 Biography 2 Family2.1 Henry Playford 2.2 John Playford
John Playford
the Younger3 Selected publications 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 Sheet Music 8 Discography 9 External linksBiography[edit] John Playford
John Playford
(1623-1686) - Parthenia, No. 7, Musicks Recreation on the Viol, Lyra-Way, 1669Performed by Phillip W. SernaProblems playing this file? See media help. John Playford
John Playford
(1623-1686) - Gerards Mistresse, No. 55, Musicks Recreation on the Viol, Lyra-Way, 1652Performed by Phillip W
[...More...]

"John Playford" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The English Dancing Master
The Dancing Master
The Dancing Master
(first edition: The English Dancing Master) is a dancing manual containing the music and instructions for English Country Dances. It was published in several editions by John Playford and his successors from 1651 until c1728. The first edition contained 105 dances with single line melodies; subsequent editions introduced new songs and dances, while dropping others, and the work eventually encompassed three volumes
[...More...]

"The English Dancing Master" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Louis XIV
Louis XIV (5 September 1638 – 1 September 1715), known as Louis the God-Given (Louis Dieudonné), Louis the Great (Louis le Grand) or the Sun King (Roi Soleil), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon
House of Bourbon
who reigned as King of France
King of France
from 1643 until his death in 1715. Starting at the age of 4, his reign of 72 years and 110 days is the longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country in European history.[1][2] In the age of absolutism in Europe, Louis XIV's France was a leader in the growing centralization of power.[3] Louis began his personal rule of France
France
in 1661, after the death of his chief minister, the Italian Cardinal Mazarin.[4] An adherent of the concept of the divine right of kings, which advocates the divine origin of monarchical rule, Louis continued his predecessors' work of creating a centralized state governed from the capital
[...More...]

"Louis XIV" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Irish Set Dance
Irish set dance, sometimes called "country sets", is a popular form of folk dancing in Ireland.Contents1 History 2 The Set 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Set dances are based on quadrilles, which were court dances. These were transformed by the Irish into a unique folk dance of the Irish rural communities. When the Gaelic League
Gaelic League
was formed in 1897, it sought to discourage set dance, because it was perceived as being of foreign origins, and consequently at odds with the League's nationalist agenda
[...More...]

"Irish Set Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Beauchamp-Feuillet Notation
Beauchamp–Feuillet notation is a system of dance notation used in Baroque dance.eight bars of a dance recorded and published by Feuillet in 1700The notation was commissioned by Louis XIV (who had founded the Académie Royale de Danse
Académie Royale de Danse
in 1661), and devised in the 1680s by Pierre Beauchamp. The notation system was first described in detail in 1700 by Raoul-Auger Feuillet
Raoul-Auger Feuillet
in Chorégraphie. Feuillet also then began a programme of publishing complete notated dances
[...More...]

"Beauchamp-Feuillet Notation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Essex
John Essex
John Essex
(born c.1680 - died 1744, London) was an English dancer, choreographer and author who promoted the recording of dance steps through notation as well as performing in London
London
theatre. In 1728 he published his major work The Dancing-Master, or, The Art of Dancing Explained, a translation of Pierre Rameau's Le maître à danser (1725).Contents1 Life 2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He is first mentioned in record in 1702 as a dancer at Drury Lane Theatre, performing serious and comic dances. In 1703 he left after a dispute with the manager, Christopher Rich. He set up as an independent dance teacher and teacher of music in Rood Lane (off Fenchurch Street) in the parish of St Dionis Backchurch
St Dionis Backchurch
in the City of London.[1][2] He became part of a group of dance teachers who sought to modernise and improve the teaching and record of dancing
[...More...]

"John Essex" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Haitian Revolution
Haitian victoryFrench colonial government expelled Massacre of the FrenchTerritorial changes Independent Empire of Haiti
Haiti
establishedBelligerents1791–1793 Ex-slaves French royalists Spain
Spain
(fr
[...More...]

"Haitian Revolution" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Morris Dance
Morris
Morris
dance is a form of English folk dance usually accompanied by music. It is based on rhythmic stepping and the execution of choreographed figures by a group of dancers, usually wearing bell pads on their shins. Implements such as sticks, swords and handkerchiefs may also be wielded by the dancers
[...More...]

"Morris Dance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cha-cha-cha (dance)
The cha-cha-chá, or simply cha-cha in the U.S., is a dance of Cuban origin.[1][2] It is danced to the music of the same name introduced by Cuban composer and violinist Enrique Jorrin in the early 1950's. This rhythm was developed from the danzón-mambo. The name of the dance is an onomatopoeia derived from the shuffling sound of the dancers' feet.[3]Contents1 Origin 2 Description2.1 Basic step of cha-cha-chá 2.2 Hip movement3 International Latin style cha-cha 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigin[edit]Cha-cha rhythmIn the early 1950s, Enrique Jorrín worked as a violinist and composer with the charanga group Orquesta América. The group performed at dance halls in Havana where they played danzón, danzonete, and danzon-mambo for dance-orientated crowds. Jorrín noticed that many of the dancers at these gigs had difficulty with the syncopated rhythms of the danzón-mambo
[...More...]

"Cha-cha-cha (dance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Jane Austen
Jane Austen
Jane Austen
(UK: /ˈɒstɪn/; 16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism.[2][b] Her use of biting irony, along with her realism and social commentary, have earned her acclaim among critics and scholars. With the publications of Sense and Sensibility
Sense and Sensibility
(1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park
Mansfield Park
(1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer
[...More...]

"Jane Austen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Charles Dickens
Charles John Huffam Dickens (/ˈdɪkɪnz/; 7 February 1812 – 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world's best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era.[1] His works enjoyed unprecedented popularity during his lifetime, and by the 20th century critics and scholars had recognised him as a literary genius. His novels and short stories enjoy lasting popularity.[2][3] Born in Portsmouth, Dickens left school to work in a factory when his father was incarcerated in a debtors' prison
[...More...]

"Charles Dickens" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thomas Hardy
Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist and poet. A Victorian realist in the tradition of George Eliot, he was influenced both in his novels and in his poetry by Romanticism, especially William Wordsworth.[1] He was highly critical of much in Victorian society, especially on the declining status of rural people in Britain, such as those from his native South West England. While Hardy wrote poetry throughout his life and regarded himself primarily as a poet, his first collection was not published until 1898
[...More...]

"Thomas Hardy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Waltz
The waltz (from German Walzer [ˈvalt͡sɐ̯]) is a ballroom and folk dance, normally in  triple (help·info) time, performed primarily in closed position.Contents1 History 2 Variants 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit]Play mediaWaltzThere are several references to a sliding or gliding dance that would evolve into the waltz that dates from 16th century Europe, including the representations of the printmaker Hans Sebald Beham
[...More...]

"Waltz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.