HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Countervalue
In military doctrine, countervalue is the targeting of an opponent's assets which are of value but not actually a military threat, such as cities and civilian populations. Counterforce
Counterforce
is the targeting of an opponent's military forces and facilities.[1][2] The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., records the first use of the word in 1660 and the first use in the modern sense in 1965, where it is described as a "euphemism for attacking cities".Contents1 Theory 2 International law 3 See also 4 ReferencesTheory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)In warfare, and in particular nuclear warfare, enemy targets can be divided into two general types: counterforce military targets and countervalue civilian targets
[...More...]

Military Doctrine
Military doctrine is the expression of how military forces contribute to campaigns, major operations, battles, and engagements. It is a guide to action, rather than hard and fast rules[1][2]. Doctrine provides a common frame of reference across the military. It helps standardize operations, facilitating readiness by establishing common ways of accomplishing military tasks. Doctrine links theory, history, experimentation, and practice.[3] Its objective is to foster initiative and creative thinking
[...More...]

picture info

Fourth Geneva Convention
The Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian
Civilian
Persons in Time of War, commonly referred to as the Fourth Geneva Convention and abbreviated as GCIV, is one of the four treaties of the Geneva Conventions. It was adopted in August 1949. While the first three conventions dealt with combatants, the Fourth Geneva Convention
Fourth Geneva Convention
was the first to deal with humanitarian protections for civilians in a war zone
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Scorched Earth
A scorched-earth policy is a military strategy that aims to destroy anything that might be useful to the enemy while it is advancing through or withdrawing from a location. Any assets that could be used by the enemy may be targeted, for example food sources, water supplies, transportation, communications, industrial resources, and even the locale's people themselves. The practice can be carried out by the military in enemy territory, or in its own home territory
[...More...]

picture info

Revenge
Revenge
Revenge
is a form of justice enacted in the absence of the norms of formal law and jurisprudence. Often, revenge is defined as being a harmful action against a person or group in response to a grievance, be it real or perceived. It is used to punish a wrong by going outside the law. Francis Bacon
Francis Bacon
described revenge as a kind of "wild justice" that "does..
[...More...]

picture info

Balance Of Power In International Relations
The balance of power theory in international relations suggests that national security is enhanced when military capability is distributed so that no one state is strong enough to dominate all others.[1] If one state becomes much stronger than others, the theory predicts that it will take advantage of its strength and attack weaker neighbors, thereby providing an incentive for those threatened to unite in a defensive coalition. Some realists maintain that this would be more stable as aggression would appear unattractive and would be averted if there was equilibrium of power between the rival coalitions.[1] When confronted by a significant external threat, states that wish to form alliances may "balance" or "bandwagon"
[...More...]

Balance Of Terror
"Balance of Terror", written by Paul Schneider and directed by Vincent McEveety, is the fifteenth episode of the first season of the American science fiction television series, Star Trek, that first aired on December 15, 1966. It was repeated on August 3, 1967. The episode is a science-fiction version of a submarine film; Schneider drew on the film The Enemy Below, casting the Enterprise as the American destroyer and the Romulan
Romulan
vessel as the U-boat.[1] The episode introduces the Romulans. Mark Lenard, playing the Romulan commander, makes his first "Star Trek" appearance. On September 16, 2006, "Balance of Terror" became the first digitally remastered Star Trek
Star Trek
episode, featuring enhanced and new visual effects, to be broadcast.Contents1 Plot 2 Reception 3 Continuity 4 References 5 External linksPlot[edit] The starship USS Enterprise under the command of Captain James T
[...More...]

Peace Through Strength
" Peace
Peace
through strength" is a phrase which suggests that military power can help preserve peace. It is quite old and has famously been used by many leaders from Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
Hadrian
Hadrian
in the first century AD to former U.S. President
President
Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
in the 1980s. The concept has long been associated with realpolitik.[1] The idea has critics: "' Peace
Peace
through strength' easily enough becomes 'peace through war,'" according to Andrew Bacevich.Contents1 History1.1 United States
United States
of America1.1.1 The US Republican party2 Criticism 3 Trademark dispute 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The phrase and concept date to ancient times
[...More...]

picture info

Deterrence Theory
Deterrence theory
Deterrence theory
gained increased prominence as a military strategy during the Cold War
War
with regard to the use of nuclear weapons. It took on a unique connotation during this time as an inferior nuclear force, by virtue of its extreme destructive power, could deter a more powerful adversary, provided that this force could be protected against destruction by a surprise attack. Deterrence is a strategy intended to dissuade an adversary from taking an action not yet started, or to prevent them from doing something that another state desires. A credible nuclear deterrent, Bernard Brodie wrote in 1959, must be always at the ready, yet never used.[1][a] In Thomas Schelling's (1966) classic work on deterrence, the concept that military strategy can no longer be defined as the science of military victory is presented
[...More...]

Collateral Damage
Collateral damage is a general term for deaths, injuries, or other damage inflicted on an unintended target. In American military terminology, it is used for the incidental killing or wounding of non-combatants or damage to non-combatant property during an attack on a legitimate military target.[1][2] In US military terminology, the unintentional destruction of allied or neutral targets is called friendly fire. Critics of the term see it as a euphemism that dehumanizes non-combatants killed or injured during combat, used to reduce the perception of culpability of military leadership in failing to prevent non-combatant casualties.[3][4][5][6]Contents1 Etymology 2 Non-military uses of the phrase 3 Controversy 4 International humanitarian law 5 U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Protocol I
Protocol I
Protocol I
is a 1977 amendment protocol to the Geneva Conventions relating to the protection of victims of international conflicts, where "armed conflicts in which peoples are fighting against colonial domination, alien occupation or racist regimes" are to be considered international conflicts.[1] It reaffirms the international laws of the original Geneva Conventions
Geneva Conventions
of 1949, but adds clarifications and new provisions to accommodate developments in modern international warfare that have taken place since the Second World War. As of June 2013, it had been ratified by 174 states,[2] with the United States, Israel, Iran, Pakistan, India, and Turkey
Turkey
being notable exceptions
[...More...]

picture info

International Law
International law, also known as public international law and law of nations,[1] is the set of rules, norms, and standards generally accepted in relations between nations.[2][3] It establishes normative guidelines and a common conceptual framework for states to follow across a broad range of domains, including war, diplomacy, trade, and human rights. International law
International law
thus provides a mean for states to practice more stable, consistent, and organized international relations.[4] The sources of international law include international custom (general state practice accepted as law), treaties, and general principles of law recognised by most national legal systems
[...More...]

No First Use
No first use (NFU) refers to a pledge or a policy by a nuclear power not to use nuclear weapons as a means of warfare unless first attacked by an adversary using nuclear weapons. Earlier, the concept had also been applied to chemical and biological warfare. China
China
declared its NFU policy in 1964, and has since maintained this policy
[...More...]

picture info

Nuclear Deterrence
Deterrence theory
Deterrence theory
gained increased prominence as a military strategy during the Cold War
War
with regard to the use of nuclear weapons. It took on a unique connotation during this time as an inferior nuclear force, by virtue of its extreme destructive power, could deter a more powerful adversary, provided that this force could be protected against destruction by a surprise attack. Deterrence is a strategy intended to dissuade an adversary from taking an action not yet started, or to prevent them from doing something that another state desires. A credible nuclear deterrent, Bernard Brodie wrote in 1959, must be always at the ready, yet never used.[1][a] In Thomas Schelling's (1966) classic work on deterrence, the concept that military strategy can no longer be defined as the science of military victory is presented
[...More...]

Assured Destruction
In military strategy, assured destruction is where behaviors or choices are deterred because they will lead to overwhelming punitive consequences. It was most often discussed as mutually assured destruction (MAD), assuming there are exactly two parties in the conflict
[...More...]