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Corrientes
Corrientes
Corrientes
(Spanish pronunciation: [koˈrjentes]; Guaraní: Taragüí, literally: "Currents") is the capital city of the province of Corrientes, Argentina, located on the eastern shore of the Paraná River, about 1,000 km (621 mi) from Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires
and 300 km (186 mi) from Posadas, on National Route 12. It has a population of 328,689 according to the 2001 Census. It lies opposite its twin city, Resistencia, Chaco. It has a mix of colonial and modern architecture, several churches and a number of lapacho, ceibo, jacaranda and orange trees. It is also home to one of the biggest carnival celebrations in the country. The annual average temperature is 20 °C (68 °F), with maximum and minimum averages of 45 and 5 °C (113 and 41 °F) respectively
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Erythrina Crista-galli
Many, see text Erythrina
Erythrina
crista-galli, often known as the cockspur coral tree, is a flowering tree in the family Fabaceae, native to Argentina, Uruguay, southern Brazil
Brazil
and Paraguay. It is widely planted as a street or garden tree in other countries, notably in California. It is known by several common names within South America: ceibo, seíbo (Spanish), corticeira (Portuguese) and the more ambiguous bucaré, to name a few. Its specific epithet crista-galli means "cock's comb" in Latin. The ceibo is the national tree of Argentina, and its flower the national flower of Argentina
Argentina
and Uruguay. This species characteristically grows wild in gallery forest ecosystems along watercourses, as well as in swamps and wetlands
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Telephone Numbering In Argentina
In Argentina, area codes are two, three, or four digits long (after the initial zero). Local customer numbers are six to eight figures long
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Guarani People
Guaraní are a group of culturally related indigenous peoples of South America. They are distinguished from the related Tupí by their use of the Guaraní language. The traditional range of the Guaraní people
Guaraní people
is in present-day Paraguay
Paraguay
between the Uruguay River
Uruguay River
and lower Paraguay River, the Misiones
Misiones
Province of Argentina, southern Brazil
Brazil
once as far north as Rio de Janeiro, and parts of Uruguay
Uruguay
and Bolivia.[1] Although their demographic dominance of the region has been reduced by European colonisation and the commensurate rise of mestizos, there are contemporary Guaraní populations in these areas
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Juan Díaz De Solís
Juan Díaz de Solís (1470 – 20 January 1516) was a 16th-century navigator and explorer. He is also said to be the first European to land on what is now modern day Uruguay.Contents1 Biography 2 Honors 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] His origins are disputed.[1] One document records him as a Portuguese in the service of Castile ("Spain"), having possibly been born in Lisbon
Lisbon
or São Pedro de Solis.[2] Others claim that his birth took place in Lebrija, in what is now the province of Seville, Spain, where documentation testifies that he lived when he was in Castile, as vecino ("neighbor"), meaning living there. However he began his naval career in Portugal
Portugal
as João Dias de Solis, where he became a pilot in the Portuguese India Armadas
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Peninsula
A peninsula (Latin: paeninsula from paene "almost” and insula "island") is a piece of land surrounded by water on the majority of its border, while being connected to a mainland from which it extends. Examples are the Upper and Lower peninsulas of the U.S. state of Michigan, the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
and the Malay peninsula.[1][2][3][4] The surrounding water is usually understood to be continuous, though not necessarily named as a single body of water. Peninsulas are not always named as such; one can also be a headland, cape, island promontory, bill, point, or spit.[5] A point is generally considered a tapering piece of land projecting into a body of water that is less prominent than a cape.[6] A river which courses through a very tight meander is also sometimes said to form a "peninsula" within the (almost closed) loop of water
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ICAO Airport Code
The ICAO (/ˌaɪˌkeɪˈoʊ/, eye-KAY-oh) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter code designating aerodromes around the world. These codes are defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization, and published in ICAO Document 7910: Location Indicators are used by air traffic control and airline operations such as flight planning. ICAO codes are also used to identify other aviation facilities such as weather stations, International Flight Service Stations or Area Control Centers, whether or not they are located at airports. Flight information regions are also identified by a unique ICAO-code.Contents1 History 2 ICAO codes vs
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IATA Airport Code
An IATA airport code, also known as an IATA location identifier, IATA station code or simply a location identifier,[1] is a three-letter code designating many airports around the world, defined by the International Air Transport Association
International Air Transport Association
(IATA). The characters prominently displayed on baggage tags attached at airport check-in desks are an example of a way these codes are used. The assignment of these codes is governed by IATA Resolution 763, and it is administered by IATA headquarters in Montreal. The codes are published semiannually in the IATA Airline Coding Directory.[2] IATA also provides codes for railway stations and for airport handling entities. A list of airports sorted by IATA code is available. A list of railway station codes, shared in agreements between airlines and rail lines such as Amtrak, SNCF
SNCF
French Rail, and Deutsche Bahn, is available
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Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
Hydroelectricity
is electricity produced from hydropower. In 2015 hydropower generated 16.6% of the world's total electricity and 70% of all renewable electricity,[1] and was expected to increase about 3.1% each year for the next 25 years. Hydropower
Hydropower
is produced in 150 countries, with the Asia-Pacific
Asia-Pacific
region generating 33 percent of global hydropower in 2013. China
China
is the largest hydroelectricity producer, with 920 TWh
TWh
of production in 2013, representing 16.9 percent of domestic electricity use. The cost of hydroelectricity is relatively low, making it a competitive source of renewable electricity. The hydro station consumes no water, unlike coal or gas plants. The average cost of electricity from a hydro station larger than 10 megawatts is 3 to 5 U.S
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Paraguay
Coordinates: 23°S 58°W / 23°S 58°W / -23; -58Republic of ParaguayRepública del Paraguay  (Spanish) Tetã Paraguái  (Guaraní)Flag (obverse)Seal [nb 1]Motto: "Paz y justicia" (Spanish) "Peace and justice"Anthem:  Paraguayos, República o Muerte  (Spanish) Paraguayans, Republic or DeathLocation of  Paraguay  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Asunción 25°16′S 57°40′W / 25.267°S 57.667°W / -25.267; -57.667Official languagesSpanish GuaraniEthnic groups (2016[1])95% Mestizo 5% otherDemonym Paraguayan Guaraní (colloquial)[2]Government Unitary presidential constitutional republic• PresidentHoracio Cartes• Vice PresidentJuan AfaraLegislature Congress• Upper houseSenate• Lowe
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Society Of Jesus
The Society of Jesus
Society of Jesus
(SJ; Latin: Societas Iesu) is a religious order of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
headquartered in Rome. It was founded by Ignatius of Loyola
Ignatius of Loyola
with the approval of Pope Paul III
Pope Paul III
in 1540. The members are called Jesuits
Jesuits
(Latin: Iesuitæ).[2] The society is engaged in evangelization and apostolic ministry in 112 nations. Jesuits
Jesuits
work in education, research, and cultural pursuits. Jesuits also give retreats, minister in hospitals and parishes, sponsor direct social ministries, and promote ecumenical dialogue. Saint Ignatius of Loyola, a Basque nobleman from the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
area of northern Spain, founded the society after discerning his spiritual vocation while recovering from a wound sustained in the Battle of Pamplona
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Jacaranda
Jacaranda
Jacaranda
is a genus of 49 species of flowering plants in the family Bignoniaceae, native to tropical and subtropical regions of Mexico, Central America, Argentina
Argentina
South America, Cuba, Florida, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and the Bahamas.[1] It has been planted widely in Asia, especially in Nepal. Jacaranda mimosifolia is quite common in southern California, Argentina, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Australia, Spain
Spain
and Zambia, and has been introduced to most tropical and subtropical regions to the extent that it has entered the popular culture. The generic name is also used as the common name.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Taxonomy3.1 Species4 Cultivation 5 Uses 6 References 7 External linksEtymology[edit] The name is believed to be of Guarani origin, meaning fragrant.[2] The word jacaranda was described in A supplement to Mr
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Lapacho
Lapacho
Lapacho
or Taheebo is herbal tea made from the inner bark of the Pau d'arco tree[1] Handroanthus impetiginosus. Lapacho
Lapacho
is used in the herbal medicine of several South and Central American indigenous peoples to treat a number of ailments including infection, fever and stomach complaints.[1] The active ingredients such as lapachol have been found to possess significant abortifacient and reproductive toxicity effects for rats.[2][3][4] Taheebo is the common name for the inner bark of the Red or Purple Lapacho
Lapacho
tree. This tree grows high in the Andes of the South American rainforest. The Red Lapacho's purple-colored inner bark was one of the main medicines used by the Incas and has been used for over 1,000 years by the Kallawaya.[5] Lapacho
Lapacho
is promoted as a treatment for a number of human ailments, including cancer
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INDEC
National Statistics and Censuses Institute (Spanish: Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Censos, INDEC) is the Argentine government agency responsible for the collection and processing of statistical data. The institute also analyses economic and social indicators such as inflation rate, consumer price index and unemployment, among others.Contents1 Functions 2 History 3 Controversy 4 References 5 External linksFunctions[edit] The INDEC is supervised by different federal agencies, and is under the direct oversight of the Secretaría de Programación Económica y Regional (Secretariat of Economic and Regional Planning) of the Ministerio de Economía y Producción (Ministry of Economy and Production, MECON). The INDEC coordinates the Sistema Estadístico Nacional (National Statistics' System, SEN) through which the national, provincial and local statistical services work together
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Pedro De Mendoza
Pedro de Mendoza
Pedro de Mendoza
y Luján (c. 1487 – June 23, 1537) was a Spanish conquistador, soldier and explorer, and the first adelantado of New Andalusia.Contents1 Setting sail 2 Battling the natives along the Rio de la Plata 3 Difficulties 4 Mendoza heads home 5 ReferencesSetting sail[edit] Pedro de Mendoza, also known as Don Pedro de Mendoza, was from a noble family in the Granadin town of Guadix, high in the favor of Emperor Charles V. He was also a nobleman in the Spanish court. In 1524, he was dubbed a Knight of Alcántara
Alcántara
and later received the Order of Santiago. In 1529, he offered to explore South America
South America
at his own expense and establish colonies. Thanks to the efforts of his mother María de Mendoza, in 1534 his offer was accepted: he was made adelantado governor, captain general, and chief justice over New Andalusia
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British Invasions Of The Río De La Plata
SpainViceroyalty of the Río de la Plata United KingdomCommanders and leadersRafael de Sobremonte Santiago de Liniers Juan Martín de Pueyrredón Martín de Álzaga Home Riggs Popham William Beresford  (POW) John WhitelockeStrengthFirst invasion:~2,500 soldiersSecond invasion:~2,000 soldiers in Montevideo ~7,000–8,000 soldiers in Buenos AiresFirst invasion:~1,668 soldiersSecond invasion:~6,000 soldiers in Montevideo ~9,000[1][3]-12,000[4][5] in Buenos AiresCasualties and lossesFirst invasion: 205 dead and wounded[6] Second invasion (Montevideo): 1,500 casualties Second invasion (Buenos Aires): 600 killed and wounded[1][7] First invasion: 157 dead and wounded, 1,300 captured[8] Second invasion (Montevideo): 600 casualties Second invasion (Buenos Aires): 311 killed, 208 missing, 679 wounded, 1,600 captured[1][7]v t eAnglo-Spanish War 1796–1808Atlantic25 January 1797 Cape St
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