HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Coronary Artery
The coronary arteries are the arteries of the coronary circulation that transport blood into and out of the cardiac muscle. They are mainly composed of the left and right coronary arteries both of which give off branches. The left coronary artery, arises from the aorta above the left cusp of the aortic valve and feeds blood to the left side of the heart. It branches into two arteries and sometimes a third branch is formed at the fork, known as a ramus or intermediate artery.[1] The right coronary artery, originates from above the right cusp of the aortic valve
[...More...]

Medical Subject Headings
Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) is a comprehensive controlled vocabulary for the purpose of indexing journal articles and books in the life sciences; it serves as a thesaurus that facilitates searching. Created and updated by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM), it is used by the MEDLINE/ PubMed
PubMed
article database and by NLM's catalog of book holdings. MeSH is also used by ClinicalTrials.gov
ClinicalTrials.gov
registry to classify which diseases are studied by trials registered in ClinicalTrials.gov. MeSH was introduced in 1960, with the NLM's own index catalogue and the subject headings of the Quarterly Cumulative Index Medicus (1940 edition) as precursors. The yearly printed version of MeSH was discontinued in 2007 and MeSH is now available online only.[2] It can be browsed and downloaded free of charge through PubMed
[...More...]

Terminal Sulcus (heart)
The terminal sulcus is a groove in the right atrium of the heart. The terminal sulcus marks the separation of the right atrial pectinate muscles from the sinus venarum. The terminal sulcus extends from the front of the superior vena cava to the front of the inferior vena cava, and represents the line of union of the sinus venosus of the embryo with the primitive atrium. On the internal aspect of the right atrium, corresponding to the terminal sulcus is the crista terminalis. The superior border of the terminal sulcus designates the transverse plane in which the SA node
SA node
resides
[...More...]

picture info

Sulcus (morphology)
The term sulcus (pl. sulci) is a general descriptive term for a furrow or fissure. It is used in many disciplines, such as geology, but in morphological and anatomical connections it usually refers to a groove as a feature in the surface of a limb or an organ, notably in the surface of the brain, but also in the lungs, certain muscles (including the heart), as well as in many bones, and various other major morphological features, both internal and external. Many sulci are the product of a surface fold or junction, such as in the gums, where they fold around the neck of the tooth. The term sulcus is used in invertebrate zoology to describe folds, grooves, and boundaries, especially at the edges of sclerites or between segments. In botany and palynology, the surface morphology of seeds and pollen grains is termed sulcate if one or more sulci form major features. In the case of pollen, these sulci, called colpi (sing: colpus), are the apertures through which the pollen tube germinates
[...More...]

Interatrial Sulcus
The interatrial sulcus, separating the two atria, is scarcely marked on the posterior surface, while anteriorly it is hidden by the pulmonary artery and aorta. References[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 527 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy
Gray's Anatomy
(1918)v t eAnatomy of the heartGeneralSurfacebase apex sulcicoronary interatrial anterior interventricular posterior interventricularbordersright leftInternalatria


[...More...]

picture info

Anterior Interventricular Sulcus
The anterior interventricular sulcus (or anterior longitudinal sulcus) is one of two grooves that separates the ventricles of the heart, the other being the posterior interventricular sulcus. The anterior interventricular sulcus is situated on the sternocostal surface of the heart, close to its left margin. The anterior interventricular branch of the left coronary artery runs in the sulcus along with the great cardiac vein. References[edit] This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 527 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy <
[...More...]

picture info

Posterior Interventricular Sulcus
The posterior interventricular sulcus or posterior longitudinal sulcus is one of the two grooves that separates the ventricles of the heart and is on the diaphragmatic surface of the heart near the right margin
[...More...]

picture info

Right Border Of Heart
The right margin of the heart (right border of heart) is long, and is formed by the right atrium above and the right ventricle below.The atrial portion is rounded and almost vertical; it is situated behind the third, fourth, and fifth right costal cartilages about 1.25 cm
[...More...]

picture info

Left Margin Of Heart
The left margin of heart (or obtuse margin) is shorter than the right border of heart, full, and rounded: it is formed mainly by the left ventricle, but to a slight extent, above, by the left atrium. It extends from a point in the second left intercostal space, about 2.5 mm
[...More...]

picture info

Atrium (heart)
The atrium is the upper chamber in which blood enters the heart. There are two atria in the human heart, which receive blood - the left atrium from the lungs, and the right atrium from the venous circulation. The atria receive blood, and when the heart muscle contracts, pump blood to the ventricles. All animals with a closed circulatory system include at least one atrium / auricle (humans have two atria). The atrium used to be called the "auricle", and that term is still used to describe this chamber in, for example, the Mollusca, but in humans that name is now used for an appendage of the atrium.[1]Contents1 Structure1.1 Nodes 1.2 Blood supply 1.3 Development2 Function 3 Clinical significance 4 Other animals 5 See also 6 ReferencesStructure[edit] Right heart
Right heart
anatomyleft atrial appendage shown at upper rightHumans have a four-chambered heart consisting of the right atrium, left atrium, right ventricle, and left ventricle
[...More...]

picture info

Interatrial Septum
The interatrial septum is the wall of tissue that separates the right and left atria of the heart.Contents1 Structure 2 Development2.1 At birth3 Clinical significance 4 References 5 External linksStructure[edit] The intratrial septum is a septum that lies between the left atrium and right atrium of the human heart. Development[edit] See also: Heart
Heart
development The interatrial septum forms during the first and second months of fetal development. Formation of the septum occurs in several stages. The first is the development of the septum primum, a crescent-shaped piece of tissue forming the initial divider between the right and left atria. Because of its crescent shape, the septum primum does not fully occlude the space between left and right atria; the opening that remains is called the ostium primum
[...More...]

picture info

Pectinate Muscles
The pectinate muscles (musculi pectinati) are parallel ridges in the walls of the atria of the heart. They are so-called because of their resemblance to the teeth of a comb as in pecten. Behind the crest (crista terminalis) of the right atrium the internal surface is smooth. Pectinate muscles
Pectinate muscles
make up the part of the wall in front of this, the right atrial appendage.[citation needed] In the left atrium, the pectinate muscles, fewer and smaller than in the right atrium, are confined to the inner surface of its atrial appendage. This is due to the embryological origin of the auricles, which are the true atria
[...More...]

picture info

Ventricle (heart)
A ventricle is one of two large chambers in the heart that collect and expel blood received from an atrium towards the peripheral beds within the body and lungs. The atrium (an adjacent/upper heart chamber that is smaller than a ventricle) primes the pump
[...More...]

picture info

Anatomical Terminology
Anatomical terminology
Anatomical terminology
is a form of scientific terminology used by anatomists, zoologists, and health professionals such as doctors. Anatomical terminology
Anatomical terminology
uses many unique terms, suffixes, and prefixes deriving from Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and Latin. These terms can be confusing to those unfamiliar with them, but can be more precise reducing ambiguity and errors. Also, since these anatomical terms are not used in everyday conversation, their meanings are less likely to change, and less likely to be misinterpreted. To illustrate how inexact day-to-day language can be: a scar "above the wrist" could be located on the forearm two or three inches away from the hand or at the base of the hand; and could be on the palm-side or back-side of the arm
[...More...]

picture info

Interventricular Septum
The interventricular septum (IVS, or ventricular septum, or during development septum inferius), is the stout wall separating the lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart from one another. The ventricular septum is directed obliquely backward to the right, and curved with the convexity toward the right ventricle; its margins correspond with the anterior and posterior longitudinal sulci.Contents1 Portions 2 Development 3 Disorders 4 Additional images 5 External linksPortions[edit]The greater portion of it is thick and muscular and constitutes the muscular interventricular septum. Its upper and posterior part, which separates the aortic vestibule from the lower part of the right atrium and upper part of the right ventricle, is thin and fibrous, and is termed the membranous ventricular septum (septum membranaceum).Development[edit]The muscular part of the interventricular septum derives from the bulboventricular flange which is developed due t
[...More...]

Trabeculae Carneae
The trabeculae carneae (columnae carneae, or meaty ridges), are rounded or irregular muscular columns which project from the inner surface of the right and left ventricles of the heart.[1] These are different from the pectinate muscles, which are present in the atria of the heart.Contents1 Types 2 Function 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksTypes[edit] There are 2 kinds:Some are attached along their entire length on one side and merely form prominent ridges, Others are fixed at their extremities but free in the middle, as in the moderator band in the right ventricle, or the papillary muscles that holds chordae tendinae, which are connected to cusps of valves to control flow of blood into the heartFunction[edit] The purpose of the trabeculae carneae is most likely to prevent suction that would occur with a flat surfaced membrane and thus impair the heart's ability to pump efficiently. The trabeculae carneae also serve a function similar to that of
[...More...]

.