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Cornish Pilot Gig
The Cornish pilot gig
Cornish pilot gig
is a six-oared rowing boat, built of Cornish narrow leaf elm, 32 feet (9.8 m) long with a beam of 4 feet 10 inches (1.47 m). It is recognised as one of the first shore-based lifeboats that went to vessels in distress, with recorded rescues going back as far as the late 17th century. The original purpose of the Cornish pilot gig
Cornish pilot gig
was as a general work boat, and the craft is used for taking pilots out to incoming vessels (see pilot boat) off the Atlantic. At the time, the gigs would race to get their pilot on board a vessel first (often those about to run aground on rocks) in order to get the job and hence the payment.Contents1 Pilot gigs today 2 World championships 3 See also 4 External linksPilot gigs today[edit] Today, pilot gigs are used primarily for sport, with around 100 clubs across the globe
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St. Mary's, Isles Of Scilly
St Mary's (Cornish: Ennor the mainland) is the largest and most populous island of the Isles of Scilly, an archipelago off the southwest coast of Cornwall
Cornwall
in England.Contents1 Description1.1 Civil parish and ward2 Transport2.1 RNLI3 Churches 4 Landmarks4.1 Telegraph Tower 4.2 Harry's Walls 4.3 Giant's Castle 4.4 The Garrison and Star Castle 4.5 Peninnis Head 4.6 Porthellick Cove 4.7 Other locations5 Population 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDescription[edit]St Mary's (in red) and the other isles o
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Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
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Kernewek Lowender
Cornish (Kernowek) is a revived language that became extinct as a first language in the late 18th century.[5][6] It is a Southwestern Brittonic Celtic language that was native to Cornwall
Cornwall
in south-west England. A revival began in the early 20th century. The language is considered to be an important part of Cornish identity, culture and heritage.[7][8] Cornish is currently a recognised minority language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages.[9]. It has a growing number of second language speakers.[10] A few parents are inspired to create new first language speakers, by teaching their children the language from birth.[11][12][13][14] Along with Welsh and Breton, Cornish is descended directly from the Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
language spoken throughout much of Britain before the English language
English language
came to dominate
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Mummer's Day
A day, a unit of time, is approximately the period of time during which the Earth completes one rotation with respect to the Sun
Sun
(solar day).[1][2] In 1960, the second was redefined in terms of the orbital motion of the Earth in year 1900, and was designated the SI base unit of time. The unit of measurement "day", was redefined as 86 400 SI seconds and symbolized d. In 1967, the second and so the day were redefined by atomic electron transition.[3] A civil day is usually 86 400 seconds, plus or minus a possible leap second in Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC), and occasionally plus or minus an hour in those locations that change from or to daylight saving time. In common usage, it is either an interval equal to 24 hours[4] or daytime, the consecutive period of time during which the Sun
Sun
is above the horizon
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Cornish Language
Cornish (Kernowek) is a revived language that became extinct as a first language in the late 18th century.[5][6] It is a Southwestern Brittonic Celtic language that was native to Cornwall
Cornwall
in south-west England. A revival began in the early 20th century. The language is considered to be an important part of Cornish identity, culture and heritage.[7][8] Cornish is currently a recognised minority language under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages.[9]. It has a growing number of second language speakers.[10] A few parents are inspired to create new first language speakers, by teaching their children the language from birth.[11][12][13][14] Along with Welsh and Breton, Cornish is descended directly from the Common Brittonic
Common Brittonic
language spoken throughout much of Britain before the English language
English language
came to dominate
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Treffry
Treffry is a Cornish surname
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Faroe Islands
Coordinates: 62°00′N 06°47′W / 62.000°N 6.783°W / 62.000; -6.783Faroe Islands Føroyar  (Faroese) Færøerne  (Danish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: Tú alfagra land mítt Thou, my most beauteous landLocation of the Faroe Islands
Faroe Islands
(circled) in Northern EuropeLocation of the Kingdom of Denmark
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: Nederland, [ˈneːdərlɑnt] (listen)), informally Holland,[11] is a country in Northwestern Europe with some overseas territories in the Caribbean. In Europe, it consists of 12 provinces that border Germany
Germany
to the east, Belgium
Belgium
to the south, and the North Sea
North Sea
to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea
North Sea
with those countries and the United Kingdom.[12] Together with three island territories in the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius
Sint Eustatius
and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch and a secondary official language in the province of Friesland
Friesland
is West Frisian
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Bermuda
Coordinates: 32°20′N 64°45′W / 32.333°N 64.750°W / 32.333; -64.750BermudaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Quo Fata Ferunt" (Latin) "Whither the Fates carry (us)"[1]Anthem: "God Save the Queen" (official)"Hail to Bermuda" (unofficial) "All the Bermudians" (unofficial)aLocation of  Bermuda  (circled in red) in the Atlantic Ocean  (blue)Status British Overseas TerritoryCapital Hamilton 32°18′N 64°47′W / 32.300°N 64.783°W / 32.300; -64.783Largest city St George'sOfficial languages English[2]Ethnic groups (2010[3])54% Black 31% White 8% Multiracial 4% Asian 3% OtherDemonym BermudianGovernment Parliamentary dependency under constitutional monarchy• MonarchElizabeth II• GovernorJohn Rankin• PremierE
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Chewidden Thursday
Thursday
Thursday
is the day of the week following Wednesday
Wednesday
and before Friday. According to the
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Pilot Boat
A pilot boat is a type of boat used to transport maritime pilots between land and the inbound or outbound ships that they are piloting.Contents1 History 2 Today 3 Signalling 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Wooden pilot cutter Lizzie May under sail in Brest, FranceNew York Sandy Hook
Sandy Hook
Pilot Boat Pet, No. 9.The word pilot probably came from Middle French pilot, pillot, from Italian piloto, from Late Latin
Late Latin
pillottus; perhaps ultimately from Ancient Greek πηδόν (pēdón, "blade of an oar, oar"). However, the work functions of the maritime pilot go back to Ancient Greece and Roman times, when incoming ships' captains employed locally experienced harbour captains, mainly local fishermen, to bring their vessels safely into port
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Pilot (harbour)
A maritime pilot, also known as a marine pilot, harbor pilot or bar pilot and sometimes simply called a pilot, is a sailor who maneuvers ships through dangerous or congested waters, such as harbors or river mouths. He or she is normally an ex ship captain and a highly experienced shiphandler who possesses detailed knowledge of the particular waterway, e.g. actual depth, direction and strength of the wind, current and tide at any time of the day. The pilot is a navigational expert for the port of call. Maneuvering a ship through the shallow water to berth / unberth in a port requires teamwork which involves, apart from the port pilot, the ship's captain (jointly responsible), ship's crew, port tugs, and shore linesmen. Since the pilot is on board the ship, he controls the tugs and linesmen through a radio and the ship directly
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Lifeboat (rescue)
A rescue lifeboat is a boat rescue craft which is used to attend a vessel in distress, or its survivors, to rescue crew and passengers. It can be hand pulled, sail powered or powered by an engine
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Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
is the act of propelling a boat using the motion of oars in the water, displacing water, and propelling the boat forward. The difference between paddling and rowing is that rowing requires oars to have a mechanical connection with the boat, while paddles are hand-held and have no mechanical connection. This article deals with the more general types of rowing, such as for recreation and transport rather than the sport of competitive rowing which is a specialized case of racing using strictly regulated equipment and a highly refined technique.[1]Contents1 Types of rowing systems 2 Ancient rowing 3 Venetian Rowing 4 Whitehall rowboats 5 Design factors of rowing boats 6 Oars 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTypes of rowing systems[edit] In some localities, rear-facing systems prevail. In other localities, forward-facing systems prevail, especially in crowded areas such as in Venice, Italy and in Asian and Indonesian rivers and harbors
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