HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Corning Inc
Corning Incorporated
Corning Incorporated
is an American multinational technology company that specializes in specialty glass, ceramics, and related materials and technologies including advanced optics, primarily for industrial and scientific applications. The company was known as Corning Glass Works until 1989, when it changed its name to Corning Incorporated.[2] In 1998, Corning divested itself of its consumer lines (including CorningWare
CorningWare
and Visions Pyroceram-based cookware, Corelle
Corelle
Vitrelle tableware, and Pyrex
Pyrex
glass bakeware among others) by selling the Corning Consumer Products Company subsidiary (now known as Corelle Brands) to Borden, but still holds an interest of about 8 percent. As of 2014[update], Corning had five major business sectors: display technologies, environmental technologies, life sciences, optical communications, and specialty materials
[...More...]

"Corning Inc" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Catalytic Converters
A catalytic converter is an exhaust emission control device that converts toxic gases and pollutants in exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine into less-toxic pollutants by catalyzing a redox reaction (an oxidation and a reduction reaction). Catalytic converters are usually used with internal combustion engines fueled by either petrol (gasoline) or diesel—including lean-burn engines as well as kerosene heaters and stoves. The first widespread introduction of catalytic converters was in the United States automobile market. To comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's stricter regulation of exhaust emissions, most gasoline-powered vehicles starting with the 1975 model year must be equipped with catalytic converters.[1][2][3][4] These "two-way" converters combine oxygen with carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (HC) to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O)
[...More...]

"Catalytic Converters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Joint Venture
A joint venture (JV) is a business entity created by two or more parties, generally characterized by shared ownership, shared returns and risks, and shared governance. Companies typically pursue joint ventures for one of four reasons: to access a new market, particularly emerging markets; to gain scale efficiencies by combining assets and operations; to share risk for major investments or projects; or to access skills and capabilities.[1] According to Gerard Baynham of Water Street Partners, there has been a lot of negative press about joint ventures, but objective data indicate that they may actually outperform wholly owned and controlled affiliates. He writes, "A different narrative emerged from our recent analysis of U.S. Department of Commerce (DOC) data, collected from more than 20,000 entities. According to the DOC data, foreign joint ventures of U.S
[...More...]

"Joint Venture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Spin Out
A corporate spin-off, also known as a spin-out,[1] or starburst, is a type of corporate action where a company "splits off" a section as a separate business.[2]Contents1 Characteristics1.1 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 1.2 Other definitions2 Reasons for spin-offs2.1 Conglomerate discount3 Examples3.1 Academia 3.2 Mirror companies4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingCharacteristics[edit] Spin-offs are divisions of companies or organizations that then become independent businesses with assets, employees, intellectual property, technology, or existing products that are taken from the parent company. Shareholders of the parent company receive equivalent shares in the new company in order to compensate for the loss of equity in the original stocks
[...More...]

"Spin Out" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Steve Jobs
Steven Paul Jobs (/dʒɒbz/; February 24, 1955 – October 5, 2011) was an American entrepreneur, business magnate, inventor, and industrial designer. He was the chairman, chief executive officer (CEO), and a co-founder of Apple Inc., CEO and majority shareholder of Pixar,[2] a member of The Walt Disney
Disney
Company's board of directors following its acquisition of Pixar, and the founder, chairman, and CEO of NeXT. Jobs and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak
Steve Wozniak
are widely recognized as pioneers of the microcomputer revolution of the 1970s and 1980s. Jobs was born in San Francisco, California, to parents who put him up for adoption at birth
[...More...]

"Steve Jobs" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

IPhone
GSM
GSM
models also include:LTE 700, 2100 MHz UMTS
UMTS
/ HSDPA/HSPA+ / DC-HSDPA 850, 900, 1900, 2100 MHz GSM
GSM
/ EDGE
EDGE
850, 900, 1800, 1900 MHz CDMA
CDMA
model also includes:LTE 700 MHz CDMA/ EV-DO
EV-DO
Rev
[...More...]

"IPhone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Somerville, Massachusetts
Somerville (/ˈsʌmərvɪl/ SUM-ər-vil) is a city located directly to the northwest of Boston, in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. As of 2010[update], the United States Census
United States Census
lists the city with a total population of 75,754 people, making it the most densely populated municipality in New England. As of 2010[update], it was the 16th most densely populated incorporated municipality in the country. Somerville was established as a town in 1842, when it was separated from Charlestown
[...More...]

"Somerville, Massachusetts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Optics
Optics
Optics
is the branch of physics which involves the behaviour and properties of light, including its interactions with matter and the construction of instruments that use or detect it.[1] Optics
Optics
usually describes the behaviour of visible, ultraviolet, and infrared light. Because light is an electromagnetic wave, other forms of electromagnetic radiation such as X-rays, microwaves, and radio waves exhibit similar properties.[1] Most optical phenomena can be accounted for using the classical electromagnetic description of light. Complete electromagnetic descriptions of light are, however, often difficult to apply in practice. Practical optics is usually done using simplified models. The most common of these, geometric optics, treats light as a collection of rays that travel in straight lines and bend when they pass through or reflect from surfaces
[...More...]

"Optics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
[...More...]

"List Of Business Entities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Technology Company
A technology company (often tech company) is a type of business entity that focuses primarily on the development and manufacturing of technology. Apple, Google, IBM, Lenovo, Huawei, Microsoft, and Oracle, among others, are considered prototypical technology companies.[1] Information technology
Information technology
(IT) companies and high tech companies are subsets of technology companies. See also[edit]List of the largest information technology companies Dot-com company Disney litigation Outline of technologyReferences[edit]Wikimedia Commons has media related to Technology
Technology
companies.^ What All the Recent Tech Company Splits Say about the Future of Cloud ComputingThis business-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Technology Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
[...More...]

"Multinational Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Division (business)
A division of a business, sometimes called a business sector, is one of the parts into which a business, organization or company is divided.[1] The divisions are distinct parts of that business. If these divisions are all part of the same company, then that company is legally responsible for all of the obligations and debts of the divisions. However, in a large organization, various parts of the business may be run by different subsidiaries, and a business division may include one or many subsidiaries. Each subsidiary is a separate legal entity owned by the primary business or by another subsidiary in the hierarchy. Often a division operates under a separate name and is the equivalent of a corporation or limited liability company obtaining a fictitious name or "doing business as" certificate and operating a business under that fictitious name. Companies often set up business units to operate in divisions prior to the legal formation of subsidiaries. Generally, only an "entity", e.g
[...More...]

"Division (business)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
[...More...]

"Equity (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
[...More...]

"Asset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
[...More...]

"Net Income" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
[...More...]

"Earnings Before Interest And Taxes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.