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Corn Laws
The Corn Laws
Corn Laws
were tariffs and other trade restrictions on imported food and grain ("corn") enforced in Great Britain
Great Britain
between 1815 and 1846. They were designed to keep grain prices high to favour domestic producers, and represented British mercantilism, since they were the only mercantilist laws of the country.[1] The Corn Laws
Corn Laws
imposed steep import duties, making it too expensive to import grain from abroad, even when food supplies were short. The Corn Laws
Corn Laws
enhanced the profits and political power associated with land ownership. The laws raised food prices and the costs of living for the British public, and hampered the growth of other British economic sectors, such as manufacturing, by reducing the disposable income of the British public.[2] The laws became the focus of opposition from urban groups who had far less political power than rural Britain
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Canada Corn Act
The Canada Corn Act was passed in 1843 by the British Parliament and allowed Canadian grains to enter the British market at reduced duties.[1]Contents1 Origins 2 Enactment and Repeal 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesOrigins[edit] British passage of the Importation Act 1815 - the Corn Law - impacted the market for Canadian grains by restricting their importation into Britain (despite the fact Canada was part of the British Empire). Enactment and Repeal[edit] The 1843 act was enacted to provide some relief to grain farmers in Upper Canada, by reducing the duty of Canada wheat imported into Britain to (a nominal) 1 shilling a quarter.[2] Its impact was undone, however, under the ministry of Prime Minister Sir Robert Peel who moved Britain towards free trade in 184.[3] Seen at the time as blow to Canada by abolition of the (effective) imperial preference the act had created,[4] how far its repealing impacted grain exports in practice, in the later forties and fifties,[
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The Times
The Times
The Times
is a British daily (Monday to Saturday) national newspaper based in London, England. It began in 1785 under the title The Daily Universal Register, adopting its current name on 1 January 1788. The Times and its sister paper The Sunday Times
The Sunday Times
(founded in 1821) are published by Times Newspapers, since 1981 a subsidiary of News UK, itself wholly owned by News Corp
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Exeter Hall
Exeter Hall was a hall on the north side of The Strand, London, England. It was erected between 1829 and 1831 on the site of Exeter Exchange, to designs by John Peter Gandy,[1] the brother of the visionary architect Joseph Michael Gandy. The site was formerly part of Exeter House, the London residence of the Earls of Exeter (formerly Burghley House and Cecil House), almost opposite the Savoy Hotel. The official opening date was 29 March 1831. The façade in The Strand featured a prominent recessed central extrance behind a screen of paired Corinthian columns set into a reserved Late Georgian front of housing over shopfronts
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Thomas Tooke
Thomas Tooke (/tʊk/; 28 February 1774 – 26 February 1858) was an English economist known for writing on money and economic statistics. After Tooke's death the Statistical Society endowed the Tooke Chair of economics at King's College London, and a Tooke Prize. In business, he served several terms between 1840 and 1852 as governor of the Royal Exchange Corporation
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President Of The Board Of Trade
The president is a common title for the head of state in most republics. In politics, president is a title given to leaders of republican states. The functions exercised by a president vary according to the form of government. In parliamentary and semi-presidential republics, they are limited to those of the head of state, and are thus largely ceremonial. In presidential republics, the role of the president is more prominent, encompassing also (in most cases) the functions of the head of government
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William Huskisson
William Huskisson
William Huskisson
PC (11 March 1770 – 15 September 1830) was a British statesman, financier, and Member of Parliament for several constituencies, including Liverpool.[1] He is commonly known as the world's first widely reported railway passenger casualty as he was run over and fatally wounded by George Stephenson's pioneering locomotive engine Rocket.Contents1 Background and education 2 Early life 3 Political career 4 Death 5 Family and commemorations 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksBackground and education[edit] Huskisson was born at Birtsmorton Court, Malvern, Worcestershire, the son of William and Elizabeth Huskisson, both members of Staffordshire families. He was one of four brothers
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Shilling
The shilling is a unit of currency formerly used in Austria, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, United States, and other British Commonwealth
British Commonwealth
countries. Currently the shilling is used as a currency in four east African countries of Kenya
Kenya
(Kenyan shilling) Tanzania
Tanzania
(Tanzanian shilling) Uganda
Uganda
(Ugandan shilling) and Somalia (Somali shilling) (autonomous region of Somalia
Somalia
Somaliland
Somaliland
(Somaliland Shilling). It is also the proposed currency of the east African community plans to introduce (east African shilling). The word shilling comes from scilling, an accounting term that dates back to Anglo-Saxon times, and from there back to Old Norse, where it means "division". Slang terms for the old shilling coins include "bob" and "hog"
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Prime Minister Of The United Kingdom
The Prime Minister
Prime Minister
of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
is the head of Her Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom. The Prime Minister
Prime Minister
(informally abbreviated to PM) and Cabinet (consisting of all the most senior ministers, most of whom are government department heads) are collectively accountable for their policies and actions to the Monarch, to Parliament, to their political party and ultimately to the electorate. The office is one of the Great Offices of State
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Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke Of Wellington
Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (1 May 1769 – 14 September 1852), was an Anglo-Irish soldier and statesman who was one of the leading military and political figures of 19th-century Britain, serving twice as Prime Minister. His defeat of Napoleon
Napoleon
at the Battle of Waterloo
Battle of Waterloo
in 1815 puts him in the first rank of Britain's military heroes. Wellesley was born in Dublin, into the Protestant Ascendancy
Protestant Ascendancy
in Ireland. He was commissioned as an ensign in the British Army
British Army
in 1787, serving in Ireland
Ireland
as aide-de-camp to two successive Lords Lieutenant of Ireland. He was also elected as a Member of Parliament in the Irish House of Commons
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British Whig Party
The Whigs were a political faction and then a political party in the parliaments of England, Scotland, Great Britain, Ireland and the United Kingdom. Between the 1680s and 1850s, they contested power with their rivals, the Tories. The Whigs' origin lay in constitutional monarchism and opposition to absolute monarchy. The Whigs played a central role in the Glorious Revolution
Glorious Revolution
of 1688 and were the standing enemies of the Stuart kings and pretenders, who were Roman Catholic. The Whigs took full control of the government in 1715 and remained totally dominant until King George III, coming to the throne in 1760, allowed Tories
Tories
back in. The "Whig Supremacy" (1715–1760) was enabled by the Hanoverian succession of George I in 1714 and the failed Jacobite rising of 1715
Jacobite rising of 1715
by Tory rebels
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Charles Pelham Villiers
Charles Pelham Villiers (3 January 1802 – 16 January 1898) was a British lawyer and politician from the aristocratic Villiers family who sat in the House of Commons from 1835 to 1898, making him the longest-serving Member of Parliament (MP). Pelham Villiers also holds the distinction of the oldest candidate to win a parliamentary seat, at the age of 93. He was a radical reformer who often collaborated with John Bright. He is best known for leadership of the Anti-Corn Law League, until repeal in 1846. Lord Palmerston appointed him to the cabinet as president of the Poor-law board in 1859. He worked for numerous reforms, most notably the Metropolitan Poor Law Act of 1867. Florence Nightingale helped him formulate the reform of nursing within the poor law. His Public Works (Manufacturing Districts) Act of 1863 opened job-creating schemes in public health projects. His political importance was overshadowed by his brother the earl of Clarendon, and undercut by the hostility of W.E
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Privy Counsellor
A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically, but not always, in the context of a monarchic government. The word "privy" means "private" or "secret"; thus, a privy council was originally a committee of the monarch's closest advisors to give confidential advice on state affairs.Contents1 Privy councils1.1 Functioning privy councils 1.2 Former or dormant privy councils2 See also 3 ReferencesPrivy councils[edit] Functioning privy councils[edit] Belgium: Crown Council of Belgium  Bhutan: Privy Council of Bhutan  Brunei: Privy Council of Brunei  Canada: Queen's Privy Council for Canada  Cambodia: Supreme Privy Council of His Majesty the King of Cambodia  Denmark: Danish Council of State  Jamaica: Privy Council of Jamaica  Norway:
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Blue Book
Blue book
Blue book
or bluebook is a term often referring to an almanac, buyer's guide or other compilation of statistics and information
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Comparative Advantage
The law or principle of comparative advantage holds that under free trade, an agent will produce more of and consume less of a good for which they have a comparative advantage.[1] Comparative advantage
Comparative advantage
is the economic reality describing the work gains from trade for individuals, firms, or nations, which arise from differences in their factor endowments or technological progress.[2] In an economic model, agents have a comparative advantage over others in producing a particular good if they can produce that good at a lower relative opportunity cost or autarky price, i.e. at a lower relative marginal cost prior to trade.[3] One does not compare the monetary costs of production or even the resource costs (labor needed per unit of output) of production
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The Spectator
The Spectator
The Spectator
is a weekly British magazine on politics, culture, and current affairs.[1] It was first published on 6 July 1828.[2] It is currently owned by David and Frederick Barclay
David and Frederick Barclay
who also own The Daily Telegraph newspaper, via Press Holdings. Its principal subject areas are politics and culture. Its editorial outlook is generally supportive of the Conservative Party, although regular contributors include some outside that fold, such as Frank Field, Rod Liddle and Martin Bright. The magazine also contains arts pages on books, music, opera, and film and TV reviews. In late 2008, Spectator Australia was launched
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