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Corionototae
The Corionototae were a group of Ancient Britons apparently inhabiting what is now Northern England
Northern England
about whom very little is known. They were recorded in one Roman ex-voto inscription (now lost) from Corbridge, of uncertain date, which commemorated the victory of a prefect of cavalry, Quintus Calpurnius Concessinius, over them.[1] Historians tend to categorise them either as a tribe or a sub-tribe of the Brigantes
Brigantes
in the absence of any information.[2][3] The name Corionototae appears to contain the Celtic roots *korio- meaning an army (Irish cuire) and *towta- meaning members of a tribe or people, thus it would appear to mean "tribal army" or "people's army" which might suggest rather a military or political formation opposed to Rome; T.M
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Britons (Celtic People)
The Britons, also known as Celtic Britons
Celtic Britons
or Ancient Britons, were Celtic people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the British Iron Age into the Middle Ages, at which point their culture and language diverged into the modern Welsh, Cornish and Bretons
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Cruthin
The Cruthin (Old Irish, Old Irish pronunciation: [ˈkɾˠʊθʲɪn̠ʲ]; Middle Irish: Cruithnig or Cruithni; Modern Irish: Cruithne [ˈkɾˠɪhn̠ʲə]) were a people of early medieval Ireland
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Suessiones
The Suessiones
Suessiones
were a Belgic
Belgic
tribe of western Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
in the 1st century BC, inhabiting the region between the Oise and the Marne, around the present-day city of Soissons
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Northern England
Northern England, also known simply as the North, is the northern part of England, considered as a single cultural area. It extends from the Scottish border in the north to near the River Trent
River Trent
in the south, although precise definitions of its southern extent vary. Northern England
England
approximately comprises three statistical regions: the North East, North West and Yorkshire
Yorkshire
and the Humber. These have a combined population of around 14.9 million as of the 2011 Census and an area of 37,331 km2 (14,414 sq mi)
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Picts
The Picts
Picts
was the name given to an unidentified tribal confederation of peoples who lived in what is today eastern and northern Scotland during the Late Iron Age
Iron Age
and Early Medieval periods. They are thought to have been ethnolinguistically Celtic. Where they lived and what their culture was like can be inferred from the geographical distribution of brochs, Brittonic place name elements, and Pictish stones. The name Picts
Picts
appears in written records from Late Antiquity to the 10th century, when they are thought to have merged with the Gaels
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Proto-Celtic Language
The Proto-Celtic language, also called Common Celtic, is the reconstructed ancestor language of all the known Celtic languages. Its lexis can be confidently reconstructed on the basis of the comparative method of historical linguistics. As Celtic is a branch of the Indo-European language family, Proto-Celtic is a descendant of the Proto-Indo-European language. According to one theory, Celtic may be closest to the Italic languages, which together form an Italo-Celtic branch
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Corbridge
  Corbridge
Corbridge
is a village in Northumberland, England, 16 miles (26 km) west of Newcastle and 4 miles (6 km) east of Hexham. Villages nearby include Halton, Acomb, Aydon
Aydon
and Sandhoe.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Roman fort and town 2.2 Buildings 2.3 Border warfare3 Governance 4 Transport 5 Fairs and shows 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] Known to the Romans as something like Corstopitum or Coriosopitum, wooden writing tablets found at Vindolanda
Vindolanda
suggest it was probably locally called Coria (meaning a tribal centre). According to Bethany Fox, the early attestations of the English name Corbridge
Corbridge
'show variation between Cor- and Col-, as in the earliest two forms, Corebricg and Colebruge, and there has been extensive debate about what its etymology may be
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Ex-voto
An ex-voto is a votive offering to a saint or to a divinity. It is given in fulfillment of a vow (hence the Latin
Latin
term, short for ex voto suscepto, "from the vow made") or in gratitude or devotion. Ex-votos are placed in a church or chapel where the worshiper seeks grace or wishes to give thanks. The destinations of pilgrimages often include shrines decorated with ex-votos. Ex-votos can take a wide variety of forms. They are not only intended for the helping figure, but also as a testimony to later visitors of the received help. As such they may include texts explaining a miracle attributed to the helper, or symbols such as a painted or modeled reproduction of a miraculously healed body part, or a directly related item such as a crutch given by a person formerly lame
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Coriondi
The Coriondi (Κοριονδοί) were a people of early Ireland, referred to in Ptolemy's 2nd century Geography as living in southern Leinster.[1] MacNeill identifies a later Irish group, the Coraind, in the Boyne valley, who may be the same people.[2] Other possibly related names include the Corcu Cuirnd,[2] Cuirennrige and Dál Cuirind in early medieval Ireland, and in Britain, the Corionototae, known from an inscription in Hexham, Northumberland, and Corinion, the Brythonic name for Cirencester, Gloucestershire.[1] The element *corio- also occurs in Gaulish personal and tribal names, usually taken to mean an army or troop of warriors.[3] References[edit]^ a b T. F. O'Rahilly, Early Irish History and Mythology, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1946, pp. 33-34 ^ a b Eoin MacNeill, "Early Irish population groups: their nomenclature, classification and chronology", Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy (C) 29, 1911, pp. 59–114 ^ J
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Iceni
The Iceni
Iceni
/aɪˈsiːnaɪ/ or Eceni were a Brittonic tribe of eastern Britain during the Iron Age and early Roman era. Their territory included present-day Norfolk
Norfolk
and parts of Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire, and bordered the area of the Corieltauvi
Corieltauvi
to the west, and the Catuvellauni
Catuvellauni
and Trinovantes
Trinovantes
to the south
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Lopocares
The Lopocares were a conjectural group of Ancient Britons inhabiting the area around Corbridge
Corbridge
in Northumberland, Northeast England. They may have been a sub-tribe or sept of the Brigantes. The Lopocares are not directly attested in any records: the name is reconstructed from the name of Corbridge
Corbridge
as given in the Ravenna Cosmography, Corielopocarium, but this appears in another Roman source — the Antonine Itinerary
Antonine Itinerary
— in a different form as Corstopitium. The "corie-" element is interpreted either as a Celtic word *korio-, army or host or as the Latin curia, but the meaning of the name Lopocares itself is unknown.[1] References[edit]^ B.C. Burnham & J. S
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Lugi
The Lugi
Lugi
were a people of ancient Britain, known only from a single mention of them by the geographer Ptolemy
Ptolemy
c. 150. from his general description and the approximate locations of their neighbors their territory was along the western coast of the Moray Firth
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Novantae
The Novantae
Novantae
were a people of the late 2nd century who lived in what is now Galloway
Galloway
and Carrick, in southwestern-most Scotland. They are mentioned briefly in Ptolemy's Geography (written c. 150), and there is no other historical record of them
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Ordovices
The Ordovices
Ordovices
were one of the Celtic tribes living in Great Britain before the Roman invasion. Their tribal lands were located in present-day North Wales
Wales
and England between the Silures
Silures
to the south and the Deceangli
Deceangli
to the north-east. The Ordovices
Ordovices
were conquered by the Roman governor Gnaeus Julius Agricola
Gnaeus Julius Agricola
in the campaign of AD 77–78. The Celtic name *ordo-wik- could be cognate with the words for "hammer": Irish 'Ord', Welsh 'Gordd' (with a G- prothetic) and Breton 'Horzh' (with a H- prothetic). The Ordovices
Ordovices
farmed and kept sheep, and built fortified strongholds and hill forts. They were among the few British tribes that resisted the Roman invasion
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