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Corian
Corian
Corian
is the brand name for a solid surface material created by DuPont. Its primary use is as a countertop/benchtop surface, though it has many other applications. It is composed of acrylic polymer and alumina trihydrate (ATH), a material derived from bauxite ore. Corian is the original material of this type, created by DuPont
DuPont
scientists in 1967.[1] A number of direct solid surface competitors to Corian
Corian
have emerged since the expiration of DuPont’s patent on solid surfaces. Corian
Corian
is manufactured in three thicknesses: 6 millimetres (0.24 in), 12 millimetres (0.47 in), and 19 millimetres (0.75 in)
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Hanwha
Hanwha
Hanwha
Group (Hangul: 한화그룹 Hanhwa Geurup) is one of the largest business conglomerates (chaebol) in South Korea. Founded in 1952 as Korea Explosives Co. (Hangul: 한국화약주식회사; Hanja: 韓國火藥株式會社), the group has grown into a large multi-profile business conglomerate, with diversified holdings stretching from explosives, their original business, to retail to financial services. In 1992 the company adopted its abbreviation as the new name: "Hanwha". The group owns Hanwha
Hanwha
Eagles, which is a professional baseball club in South Korea. The current Chairman
Chairman
of Hanwha
Hanwha
is Kim Seung-yeon. Hanwha
Hanwha
has 56 affiliates in South Korea
South Korea
alone and 226 networks (affiliates, branches and representative offices) around the world (as of June 2016)
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Avonite
Avonite Studio collection is a polyester solid surface material. Avonite Foundations collection is an acrylic solid surface material. Both Avonite series are solid surfaces that have a textured granite or gemstone look manufactured by the company Avonite Surfaces and Aristech Acrylics LLC. Avonite resembles stone, with the color being the same throughout the material
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Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a type of chronic lung disease characterized by a progressive and irreversible decline in lung function.[3][4] Symptoms
Symptoms
typically include gradual onset of shortness of breath and a dry cough.[1] Other changes may include feeling tired and nail clubbing.[1] Complications may include pulmonary hypertension, heart failure, pneumonia, or pulmonary embolism.[1] The cause is unknown.[2] Risk factors include cigarette smoking, cer
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Volatile Organic Compound
Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are organic chemicals that have a high vapor pressure at ordinary room temperature. Their high vapor pressure results from a low boiling point, which causes large numbers of molecules to evaporate or sublimate from the liquid or solid form of the compound and enter the surrounding air, a trait known as volatility. For example, formaldehyde, which evaporates from paint and releases from materials like quartz, has a boiling point of only –19 °C (–2 °F). VOCs are numerous, varied, and ubiquitous. They include both human-made and naturally occurring chemical compounds. Most scents or odors are of VOCs. VOCs play an important role in communication between plants,[1] and messages from plants to animals. Some VOCs are dangerous to human health or cause harm to the environment. Anthropogenic VOCs are regulated by law, especially indoors, where concentrations are the highest
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Stainless Steel
In metallurgy, stainless steel, also known as inox steel or inox from French inoxydable (inoxidizable), is a steel alloy with a minimum of 10.5% chromium content by mass.[1] Stainless steels are notable for their corrosion resistance, which increases with increasing chromium content. Molybdenum
Molybdenum
additions increase corrosion resistance in reducing acids and against pitting attack in chloride solutions. Thus, there are numerous grades of stainless steel with varying chromium and molybdenum contents to suit the environment the alloy must endure. Thus stainless steels are used where both the strength of steel and corrosion resistance are required. Stainless steel’s resistance to corrosion and staining, low maintenance, and familiar lustre make it an ideal material for many applications
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Recycled Glass Countertops
Recycled glass countertops are composed of 100% recycled glass (post consumer and pre-consumer) in a cement or petroleum based binder. A finished recycled glass countertop often ranges from 70 to 85 percent in recycled content.Contents1 Environmental concerns 2 Cement
Cement
vs. petroleum binders 3 Criticism 4 ReferencesEnvironmental concerns[edit] The glass used in recycled glass countertops is sourced from both post-consumer and pre-consumer sources. Post-consumer recycled glass sources are numerous, but the most common sources are curbside recycling and salvaged glass from demolished buildings. Curbside recycled glass from homes and businesses is the largest source of post consumer recycled glass (California recycled 79% of its glass bottles in 2008), but salvage glass is an emerging new source. Many more state and municipal governments have begun to mandate the separation and recycling of the glass pulled from demolished buildings
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Marble
Marble
Marble
is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble
Marble
may be foliated. In geology the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone.[1] Marble
Marble
is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical origins 3 Types 4 Uses4.1 Sculpture 4.2 Construction
Construction
marble5 Production5.1 Occupational safety5.1.1 United States6 Microbial degradation 7 Cultural associations 8 Artificial marble 9 Gallery 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksEtymologyCarlo Franzoni's sculptural marble chariot clock depicting Clio, the Greek muse of history. Marble
Marble
wall of Ruskeala
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Granite
Granite
Granite
( /ˈɡrænɪt/) is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. The word "granite" comes from the Latin
Latin
granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a holocrystalline rock. Strictly speaking, granite is an igneous rock with between 20% and 60% quartz by volume, and at least 35% of the total feldspar consisting of alkali feldspar, although commonly the term "granite" is used to refer to a wider range of coarse grained igneous rocks containing quartz and feldspar. The term "granitic" means granite-like and is applied to granite and a group of intrusive igneous rocks with similar textures and slight variations in composition and origin
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Wilsonart
Wilsonart is a global manufacturer and distributor of High Pressure Laminates and other engineered composite materials, used in furniture, office and retail space, countertops, worktops and other applications. Headquartered in Temple, Texas, Wilsonart was founded by Ralph Wilson Sr. in 1956. The company sells decorative laminates and other engineered surfaces under the Wilsonart brand and international brands Arborite, Polyrey, and Resopal.Contents1 History 2 Manufacturing 3 Acquisitions 4 The Wilson House 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Wilsonart founder Ralph Wilson moved to Texas to retire after suffering a heart attack in the early 1950s. Instead, he was encouraged by American Desk owner Arthur P. Brashear, Sr., to open a laminate company next door to American Desk’s school desk factory in Temple, Texas. He did, forming Ralph Wilson Plastics Company (RWP), later Wilsonart International, in 1956
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LG
LG Corporation
LG Corporation
(Korean: 주식회사 LG), formerly Lucky-GoldStar (Korean: Leogki Geumseong
Geumseong
(럭키금성/樂喜金星), is a South Korean multinational conglomerate corporation. It is the fourth-largest chaebol in South Korea
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Trivet
A trivet /ˈtrɪvɪt/ is an object placed between a serving dish or bowl, and a dining table, usually to protect the table from heat damage. Trivet
Trivet
also refers to a tripod used to elevate pots from the coals of an open fire (the word trivet itself ultimately comes from Latin tripes meaning "tripod"). Metal
Metal
trivets are often tripod-like structures with three legs to support the trivet horizontally in order to hold the dish or pot above the table surface. These are often included with modern non-electric pressure cookers
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The New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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Thermoforming
Thermoforming
Thermoforming
is a manufacturing process where a plastic sheet is heated to a pliable forming temperature, formed to a specific shape in a mold, and trimmed to create a usable product. The sheet, or "film" when referring to thinner gauges and certain material types, is heated in an oven to a high-enough temperature that permits it to be stretched into or onto a mold and cooled to a finished shape. Its simplified version is vacuum forming. In its simplest form, a small tabletop or lab size machine can be used to heat small cut sections of plastic sheet and stretch it over a mold using vacuum. This method is often used for sample and prototype parts
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Signage
Signage
Signage
is the design or use of signs and symbols to communicate a message to a specific group, usually for the purpose of marketing or a kind of advocacy.[1][2] A signage also means signs collectively or being considered as a group.[3] The term signage is documented to have been popularized in 1975 to 1980.[2] Signs are any kind of visual graphics created to display information to a particular audience. This is typically manifested in the form of wayfinding information in places such as streets or on the inside and outside buildings. Signs vary in form and size based on location and intent, from more expansive banners, billboards, and murals, to smaller street signs, street name signs, sandwich boards and lawn signs. Newer signs may also use digital or electronic displays. The main purpose of signs is to communicate, to convey information designed to assist the receiver with decision-making based on the information provided
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