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Cops L.A.C.
Cops L.A.C.
Cops L.A.C.
(Cops: Local Area Command) is a 2010 Australian television police drama, which screened on the Nine Network. The series followed the work of officers at the Seaview Local Area Command, a fictitious police response area of the 'State Police' set in harbourside Sydney, New South Wales. The first series premiered on 2 September 2010, in the same timeslot of Network Ten's police drama Rush.[1] On 22 November 2010, the Nine Network
Nine Network
discontinued the show due to the high production costs.[2]Contents1 Cast1.1 Main cast 1.2 Recurring cast2 Plot 3 Production 4 Episodes 5 Ratings 6 References 7 External linksCast[edit] Main cast[edit]Actor[3] Role[3] First Episode Last EpisodeKate Ritchie Det. Senior Constable Samantha 'Sam' Cooper 1.01 1.13Martin Dingle-Wall Det. Senior Constable Rhys Llewellyn 1.01 1.13Ria Vandervis Det
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Police Procedural
The police procedural, or police crime drama, is a subgenre of detective fiction that attempts to convincingly depict procedurals frequently depict investigations into several unrelated crimes in a single story. Traditional mysteries usually adhere to the convention of having the criminal's identity concealed until the climax (the so-called whodunit), whereas in police procedurals, the perpetrator's identity is often known to the audience from the outset (the inverted detective story or howcatchem). Police
Police
procedurals depict a number of police-related topics such as forensics, autopsies, the gathering of evidence, the use of search warrants, and interrogation.Contents1 Early history 2 Written stories2.1 Ed McBain 2.2 John Creasey/J. J
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HDTV
High-definition television (HDTV) is a television system providing an image resolution that is of substantially higher resolution than that of standard-definition television
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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TV Tonight
72,997 (worldwide) 838 (Australia) (April 2014[update])[1] [2]Commercial YesRegistration FreeLaunched January 2007 (2007-01)[3]Current status Online TV Tonight is an Australian-based website which features reviews, news and programming information related to television in Australia as well as OzTAM ratings information
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DVD
DVD
DVD
(an abbreviation of "digital video disc"[5] or "digital versatile disc"[6][7]) is a digital optical disc storage format invented and developed by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
in 1995. The medium can store any kind of digital data and is widely used for software and other computer files as well as video programs watched using DVD
DVD
players. DVDs offer higher storage capacity than compact discs while having the same dimensions. Prerecorded DVDs are mass-produced using molding machines that physically stamp data onto the DVD. Such discs are a form of DVD-ROM because data can only be read and not written or erased. Blank recordable DVD
DVD
discs ( DVD-R
DVD-R
and DVD+R) can be recorded once using a DVD recorder and then function as a DVD-ROM
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The Daily Telegraph (Sydney)
The Daily Telegraph is an Australian daily tabloid newspaper[2] published in Sydney, New South Wales, by Nationwide News Limited, a division of News Corp Australia, formerly News Limited. The Daily Telegraph is published Monday through Saturday and is available throughout Sydney, across most of regional and remote New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory
Australian Capital Territory
and South East Queensland
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New South Wales Police
The New South Wales
New South Wales
Police Force (NSW Police Force; previously the New South Wales Police Service and New South Wales
New South Wales
Police) is the primary law enforcement agency of the state of New South Wales, Australia. It is a servant of the Crown, independent of Government, although a minister of the Crown has administration. Divided into seventy six local area commands (LAC),[6] the NSW Police Force
NSW Police Force
consists of more than 500 local police stations and covers an area of 801,600 square kilometres in a state of some seven million people.[7] Under the Police Regulation Act, 1862 (NSW), the organisation of the NSW Police Force
NSW Police Force
was formally established in 1862 with the unification of all existing independent police units in the state
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The Bill
The Bill
The Bill
is a British police procedural television series, first broadcast on ITV from 16 October 1984 until 31 August 2010. The programme originated from a one-off drama, Woodentop, broadcast in August 1983. In its final year on air, The Bill
The Bill
was broadcast once a week, usually on Tuesdays or Thursdays, in a one-hour format. The programme focused on the lives and work of one shift of police officers, rather than on any particular aspect of police work. The Bill
The Bill
was the second longest-running police procedural television series in the United Kingdom, and among the longest running of any British television series. The title originates from "Old Bill", a slang term for the police. Although highly acclaimed by fans and critics, the series attracted controversy on several occasions
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Rush (2008 TV Series)
Rush
Rush
or rushes may refer to:Contents1 Common meanings 2 Places2.1 United States 2.2 Elsewhere3 Film and television 4 Video games 5 Music5.1 Bands and albums 5.2 Songs6 Sports 7 Ships 8 People 9 Other uses 10 See alsoCommon meanings[edit]Rushes, grass-like plants in the Juncaceae
Juncaceae

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Rescue
Rescue
Rescue
comprises responsive operations that usually involve the saving of life, or prevention of injury during an incident or dangerous situation. Tools used might include search and rescue dogs, mounted search and rescue horses, helicopters, the "jaws of life", and other hydraulic cutting and spreading tools used to extricate individuals from wrecked vehicles
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Stereo
Stereophonic sound
Stereophonic sound
or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. This is usually achieved by using two or more independent audio channels through a configuration of two or more loudspeakers (or stereo headphones) in such a way as to create the impression of sound heard from various directions, as in natural hearing.[1] Thus the term "stereophonic" applies to so-called "quadraphonic" and "surround-sound" systems as well as the more common two-channel, two-speaker systems. It is often contrasted with monophonic, or "mono" sound, where audio is heard as coming from one position, often ahead in the sound field (analogous to a visual field). In the 2000s, stereo sound is common in entertainment systems such as broadcast radio, TV, recorded music, and cinema.How stereophonic & duophonic sound systems work
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SDTV
Standard-definition television
Standard-definition television
(SDTV or SD) is a television system which uses a resolution that's not considered to be either high-definition television (720p, 1080i, 1080p, 1440p, 4K UHDTV, and 8K UHD) or enhanced-definition television (EDTV 480p). The two common SDTV signal types are 576i, with 576 interlaced lines of resolution, derived from the European-developed PAL
PAL
and SECAM
SECAM
systems; and 480i based on the American National Television System Committee NTSC system
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576p
576p is the shorthand name for a video display resolution. The p stands for progressive scan, i.e. non-interlaced, the 576 for a vertical resolution of 576 pixels, usually with a horizontal resolution of 720 or 704 pixels. The frame rate can be given explicitly after the letter.[1]Contents1 576p25 2 576p50 3 See also3.1 Television4 References576p25[edit] 576p25 has a frame rate of 25 frames per second, and thus uses the same bandwidth and carries the same amount of pixel data as 576i; as such, 576p25 is considered to be standard definition. It can be used on analog PAL
PAL
or SECAM
SECAM
systems, where it may be transported as a 576i signal with both interlaced fields corresponding to a unique frame. PALplus supports it via a "movie" mode signal flag
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576i
576i
576i
is a standard-definition video mode originally used for broadcast television in most countries of the world where the utility frequency for electric power distribution is 50 Hz. Because of its close association with the color encoding system, it is often referred to as simply PAL, PAL/ SECAM
SECAM
or SECAM
SECAM
when compared to its 60 Hz (typically, see PAL-M) NTSC-color-encoded counterpart, 480i. In digital applications it is usually referred to as "576i"; in analogue contexts it is often called "625 lines",[1] and the aspect ratio is usually 4:3 in analogue transmission and 16:9 in digital transmission. The 576 identifies a vertical resolution of 576 lines, and the i identifies it as an interlaced resolution
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1080i
1080i
1080i
(also known as Full HD or BT.709) is an abbreviation referring to a combination of frame resolution and scan type, used in high-definition television (HDTV) and high-definition video. The number "1080" refers to the number of horizontal lines on the screen. The "i" is an abbreviation for "interlaced"; this indicates that only the odd lines, then the even lines of each frame (each image called a video field) are drawn alternately, so that only half the number of actual image frames are used to produce video. A related display resolution is 1080p, which also has 1080 lines of resolution; the "p" refers to progressive scan, which indicates that the lines of resolution for each frame are "drawn" in on the screen sequence. The term assumes a widescreen aspect ratio of 16:9 (a rectangular TV that is wider than it is tall), so the 1080 lines of vertical resolution implies 1920 columns of horizontal resolution, or 1920 pixels × 1080 lines
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