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Conversion Of Units
Conversion of units
Conversion of units
is the conversion between different units of measurement for the same quantity, typically through multiplicative conversion factors.Contents1 Techniques1.1 Process overview 1.2 Conversion factors 1.3 Software tools2 Tables of conversion factors2.1 Length 2.2 Area 2.3 Volume 2.4 Plane angle 2.5 Solid angle 2.6 Mass 2.7 Density 2.8 Time 2.9 Frequency 2.10 Speed
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MOS
Mos may refer to:Contents1 Government and military 2 Places 3 Technology3.1 Computing4 Other uses 5 See alsoGovernment and military[edit]Master of the Sword, the title for the head of physical education at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point Member of Service, term used to describe any emergency responder (police officer, firefighter, emergency medical technician) that needs emergency help, usually over two-way radio Military occupation specialty code, used by the U.S
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Foot (unit)
The foot (pl. feet; abbreviation: ft; symbol: ′, the prime symbol) is a unit of length in the imperial and US customary systems of measurement. Since 1959, both units have been defined by international agreement as equivalent to 0.3048 meters exactly. In both systems, the foot comprises 12 inches and three feet compose a yard. Historically the "foot" was a part of many local systems of units, including the Greek, Roman, Chinese, French, and English systems. It varied in length from country to country, from city to city, and sometimes from trade to trade
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Chain (unit)
A chain is a unit of length that measures 66 feet, 22 yards, 100 links,[1][2]or 4 rods (20.1168 m). There are 10 chains in a furlong, and 80 chains in one statute mile. An acre is the area of 10 square chains (that is, an area of one chain by one furlong). The chain has been used for several centuries in England and in some other countries influenced by English practice. In Scotland a chain was 74 feet. By extension, chainage (running distance) is the distance along a curved or straight survey line from a fixed commencing point, as given by an odometer.Contents1 Origin 2 Instrument2.1 Ramsden's chain 2.2 Other instruments3 Contemporary use3.1 Cricket pitches 3.2 Texas
Texas
chain 3.3 Australian and New Zealand
New Zealand
use 3.4 North America4 References 5 External linksOrigin[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources
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Edmund Gunter
Edmund Gunter
Edmund Gunter
(1581 – 10 December 1626), was an English clergyman, mathematician, geometer and astronomer[1] of Welsh descent. He is best remembered for his mathematical contributions which include the invention of the Gunter's chain, the Gunter's quadrant, and the Gunter's scale. In 1620, he invented the first successful analogue device[2] which he developed to calculate logarithmic tangents.[3] He was mentored in mathematics by Reverend Henry Briggs and eventually became a Gresham Professor of Astronomy, from 1619 until his death.[4]Contents1 Biography 2 Gunter's chain 3 Gunter's quadrant 4 Gunter's scale 5 Gunter rig 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] Gunter was born in Hertfordshire in 1581. He was educated at Westminster School, and in 1599 he matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford. He took orders, became a preacher in 1614, and in 1615 proceeded to the degree of bachelor in divinity. He became rector of St
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Rod (length)
The rod or perch or pole is a surveyor’s tool[1] and unit of length equal to ​5 1⁄2 yards, 16​1⁄2 feet, ​1⁄320 of a statute mile or one-fourth of a surveyor's chain and 5.0292 meters. The rod is useful as a unit of length because whole number multiples of it can form one acre of square measure. The 'perfect acre'[2] is a rectangular area of 43,560 square feet, bounded by sides of length 660 feet and 66 feet (220 yards and 22 yards) or, equivalently, 40 rods and 4 rods. An acre is therefore 160 square rods. Since the adoption of the international yard on 1 July 1959, the rod has been equal to exactly 5.0292 meters. A rod is the same length as a perch, also sometimes called a pole which measure using cordage[3] or wood, slightly antedated the use of both rods and surveyors chains, made of more dimensionally regular materials
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Cubit
The cubit is an ancient unit of length that had several definitions according to each of the various different cultures that used the unit. These definitions ranged between 444 mm and 529.2 mm. The unit was based on the forearm length from the tip of the middle finger to the bottom of the elbow. Cubits of various lengths were employed in many parts of the world in antiquity, during the Middle Ages and as recently as Early Modern Times
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Ell
An ell (from Proto-Germanic *alinō, cognate with Latin
Latin
ulna)[1] is a unit of measurement, originally a cubit, i.e., approximating the length of a man's arm from the elbow (elbow literally meant the bend (bow) of the arm (ell)) to the tip of the middle finger, or about 18 inches (457 mm); in later usage, any of several longer units.[2][3] In English-speaking countries, these included (until the 19th century) the Flemish ell (​3⁄4 of a yard), English ell (​1 1⁄4 yards) and French ell (​1 1⁄2 yards), some of which are thought to derive from a "double ell".[4][5] An ell-wand or ellwand was a rod of length one ell used for official measurement. Edward I of England
Edward I of England
required that every town have one
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Fermi (unit)
The femtometre (American spelling femtometer, symbol fm[1][2][3] derived from the Danish and Norwegian word femten, "fifteen"+Ancient Greek: μέτρον, metrοn, "unit of measurement") is an SI unit of length equal to 10−15 metres, which means a quadrillionth of one. This distance can also be called a fermi and was so named in honour of physicist Enrico Fermi, as it is a typical length-scale of nuclear physics. Definition and equivalents[edit] 1000 attometres = 1 femtometre = 1 fermi = 0.001 picometre = 6985100000000000000♠1×10−15 metres 7006100000000000000♠1000000 femtometres = 10 ångström = 1 nanometre. For example, the charge radius of a proton is approximately 0.84–0.87 femtometres[4] while the radius of a gold nucleus is approximately 8.45 femtometres.[5] 1 barn = 100 fm2 History[edit] The femtometre was adopted by the 11th Conférence Générale des Poids et Mesures, and added to SI in 1964. The fermi is named after the Italian physicist Enrico Fermi (1901–1
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Barleycorn (unit)
The barleycorn is a small English unit of length[1] equal to 1⁄3 of an inch (i.e., close to 0.8467 cm) still used as the basis of shoe sizes in English-speaking countries.History[edit] Under the c. AD 1300 Composition of Yards and Perches, one of the statutes of uncertain date that was notionally in force until the 1824 Weights and Measures Act, "3 barly cornes dry and rounde" were to serve as the basis for the inch and thence the larger units of feet, yards, perches and thus of the acre, an important unit of area. The notion of three barleycorns composing an inch certainly predates this statute, however, appearing in the 10th-century Welsh Laws of Hywel Dda. In practice, various weights and measures acts of the English kings were standardized with reference to some particular yard-length iron, brass, or bronze bar held by the king or the Royal Exchequer
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Metric Foot
International standard ISO 2848 (Building construction – Modular coordination – Principles and rules, International Organization for Standardization, 1984) is an ISO standard used by the construction industry. It is based on multiples of 300 mm (30 cm) and 600 mm (60 cm). The numbers 300 and 600 were chosen because they are preferred numbers due to their large number of divisors – any multiple can be evenly divided into 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 24, 25, 30, etc., making them easy to use in mental arithmetic. This system is known as "modular coordination". A related standard is British Standard 6750.Contents1 Basic module1.1 Metric foot 1.2 Metric inch2 Further reading 3 ReferencesBasic module[edit] The standard unit of ISO 2848 is a basic module, a length of 10 centimetres (3.937 in) which is represented in the standards by the letter M
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French Catheter Scale
The French scale or French gauge system is commonly used to measure the size of a catheter. It is most often abbreviated as Fr, but can often be seen abbreviated as Fg, FR or F. It may also be abbreviated as CH or Ch (for Charrière, its inventor). However, simply gauge, G or GA generally refers to Birmingham gauge.[1] The French size is three times the diameter in millimeters. A round catheter of 1 French has an external diameter of ​1⁄3 mm,[2] and therefore the diameter of a round catheter in millimetres can be determined by dividing the French size by 3: D (mm) = Fr / 3 or Fr = D (mm) * 3 For example, if the French size is 9, the diameter is 9/3 = 3.0; mm. It is seen that the French unit is fully redundant with the metric system but introduces potential for rounding errors. This metrication problem is further complicated by the mixed use of metric and imperial units in medical professions using catheters
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Furlong
A furlong is a measure of distance in imperial units and U.S. customary units equal to one-eighth of a mile, equivalent to 660 feet, 220 yards, 40 rods, or 10 chains. Using the international definition of the inch as exactly 25.4 millimetres, one furlong is 201.168 metres. However, the United States does not uniformly use this conversion ratio. Older ratios are in use for surveying purposes in some states, leading to variations in the length of the furlong of about two parts per million, or 0.4 millimetres (​1⁄64 inch). This variation is too small to have many practical consequences. Five furlongs are about 1.0 kilometre (1.00584 km is the exact value, according to the international conversion).Contents1 History 2 Use 3 Conversion to SI units 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The name furlong derives from the Old English words furh (furrow) and lang (long)
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Hand (unit)
The hand is a non-SI unit of measurement of length standardized to 4 inches (101.6 mm). It is used to measure the height of horses in some English-speaking countries, including Australia,[1] Canada, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the United States.[2] It was originally based on the breadth of a human hand. The adoption of the international inch in 1959 allowed for a standardized imperial form and a metric conversion
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League (unit)
A league is a unit of length (or, in various regions, area). It was common in Europe and Latin America, but is no longer an official unit in any nation. The word originally meant the distance a person could walk in an hour.[1] Since the Middle Ages, many values have been specified in several countries.Contents1 Different definitions1.1 Ancient Rome 1.2 Argentina 1.3 English-speaking world 1.4 France 1.5 Mexico 1.6 Portuguese-speaking world 1.7 Spain 1.8 United States2 Comparison table 3 See also 4 ReferencesDifferent definitions[edit] Ancient Rome[edit] See also: Ancient Roman units of measurement The league is used in Ancient Rome, defined as ​1 1⁄2 Roman miles (7,500 Roman feet, modern 2.2 km or 1.4 miles)
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