HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







Controlled Vocabulary
Controlled vocabularies provide a way to organize knowledge for subsequent retrieval. They are used in subject indexing schemes, subject headings, thesauri,[1][2] taxonomies and other knowledge organization systems. Controlled vocabulary schemes mandate the use of predefined, authorised terms that have been preselected by the designers of the schemes, in contrast to natural language vocabularies, which have no such restriction. In library and information science, controlled vocabulary is a carefully selected list of words and phrases, which are used to tag units of information (document or work) so that they may be more easily retrieved by a search.[3][4] Controlled vocabularies solve the problems of homographs, synonyms and polysemes by a bijection between concepts and authorized terms
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Semantic Web
The Semantic Web is an extension of the World Wide Web through standards set by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).[1] The goal of the Semantic Web is to make Internet data machine-readable. To enable the encoding of semantics with the data, technologies such as Resource Description Framework (RDF)[2] and Web Ontology Language (OWL)[3] are used. These technologies are used to formally represent metadata. For example, ontology can describe concepts, relationships between entities, and categories of things. These embedded semantics offer significant advantages such as reasoning over data and operating with heterogeneous data sources.[4] These standards promote common data formats and exchange protocols on the Web, fundamentally the RDF
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Team Sport

A team sport includes any sport where individuals are organized into opposing teams which compete to win. Team members act together towards a shared objective. This can be done in a number of ways such as outscoring the opposing team. Team members set goals, make decisions, communicate, manage conflict, and solve problems in a supportive, trusting atmosphere in order to accomplish their objectives. Examples are basketball, volleyball, rugby, water polo, handball, lacrosse, cricket, baseball, and the various forms of association football and hockey.

Team sports are practiced between opposing teams, where the players generally interact directly and simultaneously between them to achieve an objective
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Rugby Football

Rugby football is a collective name for the family of team sports of rugby union and rugby league, as well as the earlier forms of football from which both games, Association football, Australian rules football, and Gridiron football evolved. Canadian football (Grey Cup still has "Rugby Football" written on it), and to a lesser extent American football were also broadly considered forms of rugby football but are seldom now referred to as such.[1][2][3][4] Rugby football started about 1845 at Rugby School in Rugby, Warwickshire, England, although forms of football in which the ball was carried and tossed date to medieval times
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



False Positives
A false positive is an error in binary classification in which a test result incorrectly indicates the presence of a condition such as a disease when the disease is not present, while a false negative is the opposite error where the test result incorrectly fails to indicate the presence of a condition when it is present. These are the two kinds of errors in a binary test, in contrast to the two kinds of correct result, a true positive and a true negative.) They are also known in medicine as a false positive (or false negative) diagnosis, and in statistical classification as a false positive (or false negative) error.[1] In statistical hypothesis testing the analogous concepts are known as type I and type II errors, where a positive result corresponds to rejecting the null hypothesis, and a negative result corresponds to not rejecting the null hypothesis
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Recall (information Retrieval)
In pattern recognition, information retrieval and classification (machine learning), precision (also called positive predictive value) is the fraction of relevant instances among the retrieved instances, while recall (also known as sensitivity) is the fraction of the total amount of relevant instances that were actually retrieved. Both precision and recall are therefore based on an understanding and measure of relevance. Suppose a computer program for recognizing dogs in photographs identifies 8 dogs in a picture containing 10 cats and 12 dogs (the relevant elements). Of the 8 identified as dogs, 5 actually are dogs (true positives), while the other 3 are cats (false positives). 7 dogs were missed (false negatives), and 7 cats were correctly excluded (true negatives). The program's precision is 5/8 (true positives / all positives) while its recall is 5/12 (true positives / relevant elements)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Bibliography
Bibliography (from Ancient Greek: βιβλίον, romanizedbiblion, lit. 'book' and -γραφία, -graphía, 'writing'), as a discipline, is traditionally the academic study of books as physical, cultural objects; in this sense, it is also known as bibliology[1] (from Ancient Greek: -λογία, romanized-logía). Carter and Barker (2010)[citation not found] describe bibliography as a twofold scholarly discipline—the organized listing of books (enumerative bibliography) and the systematic description of books as objects (descriptive bibliography). A bibliographer is a person who describes and lists books and other publications, with particular attention to such characteristics as authorship, publication date, edition, typography, etc
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]