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Control Room
A control room, operations center, or operations control center (OCC) is a room serving as a central space where a large physical facility or physically dispersed service can be monitored and controlled. A control room will often be part of a larger command center.Contents1 Overview 2 Examples of control rooms 3 Special
Special
hazards and mitigation 4 Design 5 In popular culture 6 Image gallery 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit] A control room's purpose is production control, and serves as a central space where a large physical facility or physically dispersed service can be monitored and controlled. Central control rooms came into general use in factories during the 1920s.[1] Control rooms for vital facilities are typically tightly secured and inaccessible to the general public
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Area Of Refuge
An area of refuge is a location in a building designed to hold occupants during a fire or other emergency, when evacuation may not be safe or possible. Occupants can wait there until rescued or relieved by firefighters. This can apply to the following:any persons who cannot access a safe escape route any persons assisting another person who is prevented from escaping patients in a hospital sick people people with disabilities old people very young children or infants medical personnel who may be operating on a patient at the time of the emergency operators in a critical facility whose function must not be interrupted (such as nuclear power station, a key military fortification, or a high security prison)Contents1 Technical requirements 2 Typical areas of refuge 3 See also 4 ReferencesTechnical requirements[edit] An area of refuge is typically supplied with a steady supply of fresh or filtered outside air
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High Security Prison
Supermax (super-maximum security or administrative maximum (ADX)) is a term used to describe "control-unit" prisons, or units within prisons, which represent the most secure levels of custody in the prison systems of certain countries. The term is used in the US and a number of other countries to describe the most secure form of security within a certain prison system
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Mission Control Center
A mission control center (MCC, sometimes called a flight control center or operations center) is a facility that manages space flights, usually from the point of launch until landing or the end of the mission. It is part of the ground segment of spacecraft operations. A staff of flight controllers and other support personnel monitor all aspects of the mission using telemetry, and send commands to the vehicle using ground stations. Personnel supporting the mission from an MCC can include representatives of the attitude control system, power, propulsion, thermal, attitude dynamics, orbital operations and other subsystem disciplines
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Jet Propulsion Laboratory
The Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
(JPL) is a federally funded research and development center and NASA
NASA
field center in Pasadena, California,[1] United States, with large portions of the campus in La Cañada Flintridge, California. The JPL is owned by NASA
NASA
and managed by the nearby California Institute of Technology (Caltech) for NASA. The laboratory's primary function is the construction and operation of planetary robotic spacecraft, though it also conducts Earth-orbit and astronomy missions
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FiReControl
FiReControl was a project, initiated in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in March 2004, to reduce the number of control rooms used to handle emergency calls for fire services and authorities. Presently there are 46 control rooms in England
England
that handle calls from the local public for emergency assistance via the 999 system
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Data Center
A data center is a facility used to house computer systems and associated components, such as telecommunications and storage systems. It generally includes redundant[clarification needed] or backup power supplies, redundant data communications connections, environmental controls (e.g. air conditioning, fire suppression) and various security devices
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Time Zones
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by a whole number of hours (UTC−12 to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal Standard Time is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour. Many land time zones are skewed toward the west of the corresponding nautical time zones
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Network Operations Center
A network operations center (NOC, pronounced like the word knock), also known as a "network management center", is one or more locations from which network monitoring and control, or network management, is exercised over a computer, telecommunication[1] or satellite[2] network.Contents1 History 2 Purpose 3 Networking environments3.1 Computer 3.2 Telecommunication 3.3 Satellite4 Design 5 Personnel5.1 NOC engineers6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The earliest NOCs started during the 1960s. A Network Control Center was opened in New York by AT&T in 1962 which used status boards to display switch and routing information, in real-time, from AT&T's most important toll switches
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Universities
A university (Latin: universitas, "a whole") is an institution of higher (or tertiary) education and research which awards academic degrees in various academic disciplines
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Hospitals
A hospital is a health care institution providing patient treatment with specialized medical and nursing staff and medical equipment.[1] The best-known type of hospital is the general hospital, which typically has an emergency department to treat urgent health problems ranging from fire and accident victims to a heart attack. A district hospital typically is the major health care facility in its region, with large numbers of beds for intensive care and additional beds for patients who need long-term care. Specialised hospitals include trauma centres, rehabilitation hospitals, children's hospitals, seniors' (geriatric) hospitals, and hospitals for dealing with specific medical needs such as psychiatric treatment (see psychiatric hospital) and certain disease categories. Specialised hospitals can help reduce health care costs compared to general hospitals.[2] A teaching hospital combines assistance to people with teaching to medical students and nurses
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Particle Accelerator
A particle accelerator is a machine that uses electromagnetic fields to propel charged particles to nearly light speed and to contain them in well-defined beams.[1] Large accelerators are used in particle physics as colliders (e.g., the LHC
LHC
at CERN, KEKB at KEK
KEK
in Japan, RHIC at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and Tevatron
Tevatron
at Fermilab), or as synchrotron light sources for the study of condensed matter physics. Smaller particle accelerators are used in a wide variety of applications, including particle therapy for oncological purposes, radioisotope production for medical diagnostics, ion implanters for manufacture of semiconductors, and accelerator mass spectrometers for measurements of rare isotopes such as radiocarbon
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Theme Park
An amusement park is a park that features various attractions, such as rides and games, as well as other events for entertainment purposes. A theme park is a type of amusement park that bases its structures and attractions around a central theme, often featuring multiple areas with different themes. Unlike temporary and mobile funfairs and carnivals, amusement parks are stationary and built for long-lasting operation
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Control Center (other)
Control center or Control Center may refer to: Physical facilities[edit]Control room, a central space where a large physical facility or physically dispersed service can be monitored and controlled Area Control Center, a type of air traffic control facility Mission control center, an facility that manages aerospace vehicle flights Missile launch control center or Launch control center, an intercontinental ballistic missile control facility NORAD Control Center, a Cold War-era joint command center for USAF and Army Air Defense Commands Poison control center, a type of telephone support facility for exposure to poison or hazardous substances Rumor control center, a facility designed to communicate accurate information during crisesComputing[edit]Control Center (iOS), a feature of Apple's iOS mobile operating system Control Panel (Windows), a part of the Microsoft Windows graphical user interface Switching Control Center System, a 1970s-era telecommunications computer
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Metropolitan Police
The Metropolitan Police
Metropolitan Police
Service (MPS), commonly known as the Metropolitan Police
Metropolitan Police
and informally as the Met, is the territorial police force responsible for law enforcement in Greater London, excluding the "square mile" of the City of London, which is the responsibility of the City of London
City of London
Police.[12] The Met also has significant national responsibilities, such as co-ordinating and leading on UK-wide national counter-terrorism matters, and the protection of the senior members of the British Royal Family, and also members of The Cabinet and other ministerial members of Her Majesty's Government.[13] As of January 2017, the Met employed more than 43,000 full-time personnel. This included 31,075 sworn police officers, 8,732 police staff, and 1,464 non-sworn police community support officers
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Call Center
A call centre or call center is a centralised office used for receiving or transmitting a large volume of requests by telephone. An inbound call centre is operated by a company to administer incoming product support or information enquiries from consumers. Outbound call centres are operated for telemarketing, solicitation of charitable or political donations, debt collection and market research. A contact centre is a location for centralised handling of individual communications, including letters, faxes, live support software, social media, instant message, and e-mail.[1] A call centre has an open workspace for call centre agents, with work stations that include a computer for each agent, a telephone set/headset connected to a telecom switch, and one or more supervisor stations. It can be independently operated or networked with additional centres, often linked to a corporate computer network, including mainframes, microcomputers and LANs
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