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Contract
A contract is a voluntary arrangement between two or more parties that is enforceable by law as a binding legal agreement. Contract
Contract
law recognises and governs the rights and duties arising from agreements.[1] Within jurisdictions of the civil law tradition, contract law is a branch of the law of obligations. At common law, formation of a contract generally requires an offer, acceptance, consideration, and a mutual intent to be bound
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Party (law)
A party is a person or group of persons that compose a single entity which can be identified as one for the purposes of the law
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Court Of Appeal
An appellate court, commonly called an appeals court, court of appeals (American English),[1] appeal court (British English), court of second instance or second instance court, is any court of law that is empowered to hear an appeal of a trial court or other lower tribunal. In most jurisdictions, the court system is divided into at least three levels: the trial court, which initially hears cases and reviews evidence and testimony to determine the facts of the case; at least one intermediate appellate court; and a supreme court (or court of last resort) which primarily reviews the decisions of the intermediate courts. A jurisdiction's supreme court is that jurisdiction's highest appellate court.[2] Appellate courts nationwide can operate under varying rules.[3] The authority of appellate courts to review the decisions of lower courts varies widely from one jurisdiction to another. In some areas, the appellate court has limited powers of review
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Panacea (medicine)
The panacea /pænəˈsiːə/, named after the Greek goddess of universal remedy Panakeia, Panacea, also known as panchrest,[citation needed] is any supposed remedy that is claimed to cure all diseases and prolong life indefinitely. It was in the past sought by alchemists as a connection to the elixir of life and the philosopher's stone, a mythical substance which would enable the transmutation of common metals into gold. The Cahuilla Indian people of the Colorado Desert
Colorado Desert
region of California, according to legend, used the red sap of the elephant tree (or Bursera microphylla) as a panacea medicine.[citation needed] A panacea (or panaceum) is also a literary term to represent any solution to solve all problems related to a particular issue
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Influenza
Influenza, commonly known as "the flu", is an infectious disease caused by an influenza virus.[1] Symptoms can be mild to severe.[4] The most common symptoms include: a high fever, runny nose, sore throat, muscle pains, headache, coughing, and feeling tired.[1] These symptoms typically begin two days after exposure to the virus and most last less than a week.[1] The cough, however, may last for more than two weeks.[1] In children, there may be nausea and vomiting, but these are not common in adults.[5] Nausea and vomiting occur more commonly in the unrelated infection gastroenteritis, which is sometimes inaccurately referred to as "stomach flu" or the "24-hour flu".[5] Complications of influenza may include viral pneumonia, secondary bacterial pneumonia, sinus infections, and worsening of previous health problems such as asthma or heart failure.[2][4] Th
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Pound Sterling
3p, 4p, 6p,[1] 25p, £5, Sovereign (British coin), £20, £100, £500 (Silver Kilo), £1,000 (Gold Kilo)[2]DemographicsOfficial user(s) United Kingdom9 British territories British Antarctic Territory   Falkland Islands
Falkland Islands
(alongside Falkland Islands
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Gimmick
A gimmick is a novel device or idea designed primarily to attract attention or increase appeal, often with little intrinsic value.[1][2] When applied to retail marketing, it is a unique or quirky feature designed to make a product or service "stand out" from its competitors. Product gimmicks are sometimes considered mere novelties, and tangential to the product's functioning. Gimmicks are occasionally viewed negatively, but some seemingly trivial gimmicks of the past have evolved into useful, permanent features.Contents1 Etymology 2 Examples 3 Design flaws 4 Failed gimmicks 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The origin of the term, "gimmick", is uncertain. Etymologists suggest that the term emerged in the United States in the early twentieth century
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Commerce
Commerce
Commerce
is "related to the exchange of goods and services, especially on a large scale".[1] Commerce
Commerce
includes legal, economic, political, social, cultural and technological systems that are in operation in any country or internationally.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 See also 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] Commerce
Commerce
is derived from the Latin
Latin
commercium, from cum and merx, merchandise.[2] History[edit]The caduceus has been used today as the symbol of commerce[3] with which Mercury has traditionally been associated.Some commentators trace the origins of commerce to the very start of transaction in prehistoric times
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Smoke Ball
A smoke bomb is a firework designed to produce smoke upon ignition. Smoke
Smoke
bombs are useful to airsoft games, paintball games, self-defense and pranks. They are also used in smoke tests. History[edit] The smoke bomb was first created in 1848, by UK inventor Robert Yale.[citation needed][why?] He developed 17th-century Chinese-style fireworks and later modified the formula to produce more smoke for a longer period of time. Early Japanese history saw use of a more rudimentary form of the smoke bomb. Explosives were common in Japan during the Mongol invasions of the 13th century
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Smith V Hughes
Smith v Hughes
Smith v Hughes
(1871) LR 6 QB 597 is an English contract law
English contract law
case. In it, Blackburn J
Blackburn J
set out his classic statement of the objective interpretation of people's conduct when entering into a contract. Rejecting that one should merely look to what people subjectively intended, he said,"If, whatever a man's real intention may be, he so conducts himself that a reasonable man would believe that he was assenting to the terms proposed by the other party, and that other party upon that belief enters into the contract with him, the man thus conducting himself would be equally bound as if he had intended to agree to the other party's terms."[1]Contents1 Facts 2 Judgment 3 See also 4 NotesFacts[edit] Mr Hughes was a racehorse trainer. Mr Smith, who was a farmer, brought him (Mr
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Unilateral
Unilateralism is any doctrine or agenda that supports one-sided action. Such action may be in disregard for other parties, or as an expression of a commitment toward a direction which other parties may find agreeable. Unilateralism is a neologism which is already in common use; it was coined to be an antonym for multilateralism, which is the doctrine which asserts the benefits of participation from as many parties as possible. The two terms together can refer to differences in foreign policy approached to international problems. When agreement by multiple parties is absolutely required—for example, in the context of international trade policies—bilateral agreements (involving two participants at a time) are usually preferred by proponents of unilateralism. Unilateralism may be preferred in those instances when it's assumed to be the most efficient, i.e., in issues that can be solved without cooperation
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Merritt V Merritt
Merritt may refer to: Merritt (surname) Merritt L
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Public Policy
Public policy is the principled guide to action taken by the administrative executive branches of the state with regard to a class of issues, in a manner consistent with law and institutional customs.Contents1 Overview 2 Government
Government
actions and process 3 Academic discipline 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingOverview[edit] The foundation of public policy is composed of national constitutional laws and regulations. Further substrates include both judicial interpretations and regulations which are generally authorized by legislation
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Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
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Rose & Frank Co V JR Crompton & Bros Ltd
Rose & Frank Co v JR Crompton & Bros Ltd [1924] UKHL 2 is a leading decision on English contract law, regarding the intention to create legal relations in commercial arrangements. In the Court of Appeal, Atkin LJ
Atkin LJ
delivered an important dissenting judgment which was upheld by the House of Lords. The case also is an example of the application of the Blue Pencil Rule.Contents1 Facts 2 Judgment2.1 Court of Appeal 2.2 House of Lords3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksFacts[edit] Rose and Frank Co was the sole US distributor of JR Crompton's carbon paper products
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Objectivity (philosophy)
Objectivity is a central philosophical concept, related to reality and truth, which has been variously defined by sources. Generally, objectivity means the state or quality of being true even outside a subject's individual biases, interpretations, feelings, and imaginings. A proposition is generally considered objectively true (to have objective truth) when its truth conditions are met without biases caused by feelings, ideas, opinions, etc., of a sentient subject. A second, broader meaning of the term refers to the ability in any context to judge fairly, without partiality or external influence. This second meaning of objectivity is sometimes used synonymously with neutrality.Contents1 Objectivity of knowledge 2 Objectivity in ethics2.1 Ethical subjectivism 2.2 Ethical objectivism3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksObjectivity of knowledge[edit]This section possibly contains original research
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