HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Consonant
In articulatory phonetics, a consonant is a speech sound that is articulated with complete or partial closure of the vocal tract. Examples are [p], pronounced with the lips; [t], pronounced with the front of the tongue; [k], pronounced with the back of the tongue; [h], pronounced in the throat; [f] and [s], pronounced by forcing air through a narrow channel (fricatives); and [m] and [n], which have air flowing through the nose (nasals)
[...More...]

"Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Secondary Articulation
Secondary articulation occurs when the articulation of a consonant is equivalent to the combined articulations of two or three simpler consonants, at least one of which is an approximant. The secondary articulation of such co-articulated consonants is the approximant-like articulation. It "colors" the primary articulation rather than obscuring it. Maledo (2011) defines secondary articulation as the superimposition of lesser stricture upon a primary articulation. For example, the voiceless labialized velar plosive [kʷ] has a stop articulation, velar [k], with a simultaneous [w]-like rounding of the lips. This is in contrast to the doubly articulated labial-velar consonant [k͡p], which is articulated with two overlapping stop articulations. There are a number of secondary articulations
[...More...]

"Secondary Articulation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Sulcalization
Sulcalization (from Latin sulcus, "groove"), in phonetics, is the pronunciation of a sound, typically a sibilant consonant, such as English /s/ and /z/, with a deep groove running along the back of the tongue that focuses the airstream on the teeth, producing a more intense sound. That is accomplished by raising the sides of the back of the tongue ("lateral contraction") and leaving a hollow along the mid-line. It is not clear if all sibilants are so grooved: Catford (1977) observed that the degree of sulcalization differs between places of articulation as well as between languages, but no language is known to contrast a grooved and non-grooved sibilant. English [ɹ], which allows various tongue positions without apparent distinction, may also receive its characteristic quality from being sulcal. In phonology and historical linguistics, sulcalization is the development of such a groove in a non-sulcal consonant
[...More...]

"Sulcalization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bidental Consonant
Bidental consonants are consonants pronounced with both the lower and upper teeth. They are normally found only in speech pathology, and are distinct from interdental consonants such as [n̪͆], which involve the tongue articulated between the teeth rather than the teeth themselves. The diacritic for bidental consonants in the extensions to the IPA is the same superscript plus subscript bridge, ⟨  ̪͆ ⟩. This is used for three sounds in disordered speech:A bidental percussive, [ʭ], produced by striking the teeth against each other (gnashing or chattering the teeth). A voiceless bidental fricative, [h̪͆], a fricative made through clenched teeth with no involvement of the tongue or the lips A voiced bidental fricative, [ɦ̪͆].There is at least one confirmed attestation of a bidental consonant in normal language
[...More...]

"Bidental Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Uvular–epiglottal Consonant
A uvular–epiglottal consonant is a doubly articulated consonant pronounced by making a simultaneous uvular consonant and epiglottal consonant. An example is the Somali "uvular" plosive /q/, which is a voiceless uvular–epiglottal plosive [q͡ʡ], as in [q͡ʡíìq͡ʡ] 'to emit smoke'.[1] References[edit]^ Supraglottal cavity shape, linguistic register, and other phonetic features of SomaliThis phonetics article is a stub
[...More...]

"Uvular–epiglottal Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Doubly Articulated Consonant
Doubly articulated consonants are consonants with two simultaneous primary places of articulation of the same manner (both plosive, or both nasal, etc.). They are a subset of co-articulated consonants. They are to be distinguished from co-articulated consonants with secondary articulation; that is, a second articulation not of the same manner. An example of a doubly articulated consonant is the voiceless labial-velar plosive [k͡p], which is a [k] and a [p] pronounced simultaneously. On the other hand, the voiceless labialized velar plosive [kʷ] has only a single stop articulation, velar ([k]), with a simultaneous approximant-like rounding of the lips
[...More...]

"Doubly Articulated Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Uvularization
Uvularization is a secondary articulation of consonants or vowels by which the back of the tongue is constricted toward the uvula and upper pharynx during the articulation of a sound with its primary articulation elsewhere. IPA symbols[edit] In the International Phonetic Alphabet, uvularization can be indicated by one of two methods:A tilde or swung dash through the letter indicates velarization, uvularization or pharyngealization, as in [ɫ] ("dark l")
[...More...]

"Uvularization" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Subapical Consonant
A subapical consonant is a consonant made by contact with the underside of the tip of the tongue. The only common subapical articulations are in the postalveolar to palatal region, which are called "retroflex." Most so-called retroflex consonants are more properly called apical. True subapical retroflexes are found in the Dravidian languages
Dravidian languages
of Southern India. Occasionally, the term "sublaminal" is used for "subapical," which might be better used for sounds pronounced between the underside of the tongue and the floor of the mouth, such as sucking-teeth. References[edit]Peter Ladefoged; Ian Maddieson. The Sounds of the World's Languages. Oxford: Blackwell 1996. ISBN 0-631-19814-8. Sanford B. Steever (ed.). The Dravidian Languages. Routledge. New edition 2006. ISBN 978-0-415-41267-4.This phonetics article is a stub
[...More...]

"Subapical Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Consonance And Dissonance
In music, consonance and dissonance are categorizations of simultaneous or successive sounds. Consonance is associated with sweetness, pleasantness, and acceptability; dissonance is associated with harshness, unpleasantness, or unacceptability. The terms form a structural dichotomy in which they define each other by mutual exclusion: a consonance is what is not dissonant, and reciprocally. However, a finer consideration shows that the distinction forms a gradation, from the most consonant to the most dissonant. As Hindemith stressed, "The two concepts have never been completely explained, and for a thousand years the definitions have varied" (Hindemith 1942, p. 85). The opposition can be made in different contexts:In acoustics or psychophysiology, the distinction may be objective
[...More...]

"Consonance And Dissonance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Coronal–velar Consonant
Coronal–velar consonants are doubly articulated at the velum and upper teeth and/or the alveolar ridge. An example of a coronal–velar consonant is one of the coda allophones of /n/ in the Jebero language, which is realized as dentoalveolo-velar [n̪͡ŋ].[1] References[edit]^ Valenzuela & Valenzuela (2013), p. 100.Bibliography[edit]Valenzuela, Pilar M.; Gussenhoven, Carlos (2013), "Shiwilu (Jebero)" (PDF), Journal of the International Phonetic Association, 43 (1): 97–106, doi:10.1017/S0025100312000370 v t e International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
(
[...More...]

"Coronal–velar Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Roundedness
In phonetics, vowel roundedness refers to the amount of rounding in the lips during the articulation of a vowel. It is labialization of a vowel. When a rounded vowel is pronounced, the lips form a circular opening, and unrounded vowels are pronounced with the lips relaxed. In most languages, front vowels tend to be unrounded, and back vowels tend to be rounded. However, some languages, such as French and German, distinguish rounded and unrounded front vowels of the same height, and Vietnamese distinguishes rounded and unrounded back vowels of the same height. Alekano has only unrounded vowels.[1] In the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
vowel chart, rounded vowels are the ones that appear on the right in each pair of vowels
[...More...]

"Roundedness" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Domed Consonant
Tongue shape, in linguistics (articulatory phonetics) describes the shape that the tongue assumes when it makes a sound. Because the sibilant sounds have such a high perceptual prominence, tongue shape is particularly important; small changes in tongue shape are easily audible and can be used to produce different speech sounds, even within a given language. For non-sibilant sounds, the relevant variations in tongue shape can be adequately described by the concept of secondary articulation, in particular palatalization (raising of the middle of the tongue), velarization (raising of the back of the tongue) and pharyngealization (retracting of the root of the tongue)
[...More...]

"Domed Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tongue Shape
Tongue shape, in linguistics (articulatory phonetics) describes the shape that the tongue assumes when it makes a sound. Because the sibilant sounds have such a high perceptual prominence, tongue shape is particularly important; small changes in tongue shape are easily audible and can be used to produce different speech sounds, even within a given language. For non-sibilant sounds, the relevant variations in tongue shape can be adequately described by the concept of secondary articulation, in particular palatalization (raising of the middle of the tongue), velarization (raising of the back of the tongue) and pharyngealization (retracting of the root of the tongue)
[...More...]

"Tongue Shape" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Peripheral Consonant
In Australian linguistics, the peripheral consonants are a natural class encompassing consonants articulated at the extremes of the mouth: labials and velars. That is, they are the non-coronal consonants. In Australian languages, these consonants pattern together both phonotactically and acoustically. In Arabic and Maltese philology, the moon letters transcribe non-coronal consonants, but they do not form a natural class.Australian peripheral consonantsBilabial VelarStop p kNasal m ŋApproximant wPhonology[edit] Australian languages
Australian languages
typically favour peripheral consonants word- and syllable-initially, and they are not allowed or common word- and syllable-finally, unlike the apicals. In the extinct Martuthunira, the peripheral stops /p/ and /k/ shared similar allophony
[...More...]

"Peripheral Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Labial–palatal Consonant
A labio-palatalized sound is one that is simultaneously labialized and palatalized. Typically the roundedness is compressed, like [y], rather than protruded like [u]. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet for this secondary articulation is ⟨ᶣ⟩, a superscript ⟨ɥ⟩, the symbol for the labialized palatal approximant
[...More...]

"Labial–palatal Consonant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.