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ConocoPhillips
ConocoPhillips
ConocoPhillips
Company is an American multinational energy corporation with its headquarters located in the Energy Corridor
Energy Corridor
district of Houston, Texas
Texas
in the United States. It is the world's largest independent pure-play exploration and production company and is a Fortune 500
Fortune 500
company.[2][3] ConocoPhillips
ConocoPhillips
was created through the merger of American oil companies Conoco Inc.
Conoco Inc.
and Phillips Petroleum Co
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Ogden, Utah
Ogden /ˈɒɡdɛn/ is a city and the county seat of Weber County,[4] Utah, United States, approximately 10 miles (16 km) east of the Great Salt Lake
Great Salt Lake
and 40 miles (64 km) north of Salt Lake City. The population was 84,316 in 2014, according to the US Census
Census
Bureau, making it Utah's 7th largest city.[5] The city served as a major railway hub through much of its history,[6] and still handles a great deal of freight rail traffic which makes it a convenient location for manufacturing and commerce. Ogden is also known for its many historic buildings, proximity to the Wasatch Mountains, and as the location of Weber State University. Ogden is a principal city of the Ogden–Clearfield, Utah
Utah
Metropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Weber, Morgan, Davis, and Box Elder counties
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Texas
Texas
Texas
(/ˈtɛksəs/, locally /-sɪz/; Spanish: Texas
Texas
or Tejas [ˈtexas]) is the second largest state in the United States
United States
by both area and population. Geographically located in the South Central region of the country, Texas
Texas
shares borders with the U.S
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "He h
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Pure-play
A pure play company is a company that focuses only on a particular product or activity. Investing in a pure play company can be considered as investing in a particular commodity or product of a company.[1] Pure play firms either specialize in a specific niche, or have little to no vertical integration
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Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
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Merger
Mergers and acquisitions
Mergers and acquisitions
(M&A) are transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations or their operating units are transferred or combined. As an aspect of strategic management, M&A can allow enterprises to grow, shrink, and change the nature of their business or competitive position. From a legal point of view, a merger is a legal consolidation of two entities into one entity, whereas an acquisition occurs when one entity takes ownership of another entity's stock, equity interests or assets. From a commercial and economic point of view, both types of transactions generally result in the consolidation of assets and liabilities under one entity, and the distinction between a "merger" and an "acquisition" is less clear
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Corporate Spin-off
A corporate spin-off, also known as a spin-out,[1] or starburst, is a type of corporate action where a company "splits off" a section as a separate business.[2]Contents1 Characteristics1.1 U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission 1.2 Other definitions2 Reasons for spin-offs2.1 Conglomerate discount3 Examples3.1 Academia 3.2 Mirror companies4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingCharacteristics[edit] Spin-offs are divisions of companies or organizations that then become independent businesses with assets, employees, intellectual property, technology, or existing products that are taken from the parent company. Shareholders of the parent company receive equivalent shares in the new company in order to compensate for the loss of equity in the original stocks
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Coal
Coal
Coal
is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later exposure to elevated temperature and pressure. Coal
Coal
is composed primarily of carbon, along with variable quantities of other elements, chiefly hydrogen, sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen.[1] Coal
Coal
is a fossil fuel that forms when dead plant matter is converted into peat, which in turn is converted into lignite, then sub-bituminous coal, after that bituminous coal, and lastly anthracite. This involves biological and geological processes
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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Kerosene
Kerosene, also known as paraffin, lamp oil, and coal oil (an obsolete term), is a combustible hydrocarbon liquid which is derived from petroleum, widely used as a fuel in industry as well as households. Its name derives from Greek: κηρός (keros) meaning wax, and was registered as a trademark by Canadian geologist and inventor Abraham Gesner in 1854 before evolving into a genericized trademark. It is sometimes spelled kerosine in scientific and industrial usage.[1] The term kerosene is common in much of Argentina, Australia, Canada, India, New Zealand, and the United States,[2][3] while the term paraffin (or a closely related variant) is used in Chile, eastern Africa, South Africa, and in the United Kingdom,[4] and (a variant of) the term petroleum in Croatian, Czech, Danish, Dutch, Estonian, Finnish, German, Hungarian, Latvian, Serbian, Slovak and Slovenian
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Candle
A candle is an ignitable wick embedded in wax or another flammable solid substance such as tallow that provides light, and in some cases, a fragrance. It can also be used to provide heat, or used as a method of keeping time. A candle manufacturer is traditionally known as a chandler.[1] Various devices have been invented to hold candles, from simple tabletop candle holders to elaborate chandeliers.[2] For a candle to burn, a heat source (commonly a naked flame) is used to light the candle's wick, which melts and vaporizes a small amount of fuel (the wax). Once vaporized, the fuel combines with oxygen in the atmosphere to ignite and form a constant flame
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Fargo, North Dakota
Fargo is the most populous city in the state of North Dakota, accounting for nearly 16% of the state population.[5] Fargo is also the county seat of Cass County
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Texaco
Texaco, Inc. ("The Texas
Texas
Company") is an American oil subsidiary of Chevron Corporation. Its flagship product is its fuel " Texaco
Texaco
with Techron". It also owns the Havoline
Havoline
motor oil brand. Texaco
Texaco
was an independent company until its refining operations merged into Chevron Corporation in 2001, at which time most of its station franchises were divested to the Shell Oil Company. It began as the Texas
Texas
Fuel Company, founded in 1901 in Beaumont, Texas, by Joseph S. Cullinan, Thomas J. Donoghue, Walter Benona Sharp, and Arnold Schlaet upon the discovery of oil at Spindletop. For many years, Texaco
Texaco
was the only company selling gasoline under the same brand name in all 50 US states, as well as Canada, making it the most truly national brand among its competitors
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Downstream (petroleum Industry)
The oil and gas industry is usually divided into three major sectors: upstream, midstream, and downstream. The downstream sector is the refining of petroleum crude oil and the processing and purifying of raw natural gas,[1] as well as the marketing and distribution of products derived from crude oil and natural gas. The downstream sector reaches consumers through products such as gasoline or petrol, kerosene, jet fuel, diesel oil, heating oil, fuel oils, lubricants, waxes, asphalt, natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as well as hundreds of petrochemicals. Midstream operations are often included in the downstream category and are considered to be a part of the downstream sector.Contents1 Byproduct sulfur 2 Downstream in ISO 3 See also 4 ReferencesByproduct sulfur[edit] Crude oil is a mixture of many varieties of hydrocarbons and most usually have many sulfur-containing compounds
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