HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







Mass Storage
In computing, mass storage refers to the storage of large amounts[note 1] of data in a persisting and machine-readable fashion. Devices and/or systems that have been described as mass storage include tape libraries, RAID systems, and a variety of computer drives such as hard disk drives, magnetic tape drives, magneto-optical disc drives, optical disc drives, memory cards, and solid-state drives. It also includes experimental forms like holographic memory. Mass storage includes devices with removable and non-removable media.[1][2] It does not include random access memory (RAM). There are two broad classes of mass storage: local data in devices such as smartphones or computers, and enterprise servers and data centers for the cloud. For local storage, SSDs are on the way to replacing HDDs. Considering the mobile segment from phones to notebooks, the majority of systems today is based on NAND Flash
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

UTF-8
UTF-8 is a variable-width character encoding used for electronic communication. Defined by the Unicode Standard, the name is derived from Unicode (or Universal Coded Character Set) Transformation Format – 8-bit.[1] UTF-8 is capable of encoding all 1,112,064[nb 1] valid character code points in Unicode using one to four one-byte (8-bit) code units. Code points with lower numerical values, which tend to occur more frequently, are encoded using fewer bytes. It was designed for backward compatibility with ASCII: the first 128 characters of Unicode, which correspond one-to-one with ASCII, are encoded using a single byte with the same binary value as ASCII, so that valid ASCII text is valid UTF-8-encoded Unicode as well
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Kernel (computing)
The kernel is a computer program at the core of a computer's operating system with complete control over everything in the system.[1] It is an integral part of any operating system. It is the "portion of the operating system code that is always resident in memory".[2] It facilitates interactions between hardware and software components. On most systems, it is one of the first programs loaded on startup (after the bootloader). It handles the rest of startup as well as input/output (I/O) requests from software, translating them into data-processing instructions for the central processing unit. It handles memory and peripherals like keyboards, monitors, printers, and speakers. The critical code of the kernel is usually loaded into a separate area of memory, which is protected from access by application programs or other, less critical parts of the operating system
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Kernel (operating System)
The kernel is a computer program at the core of a computer's operating system with complete control over everything in the system.[1] It is an integral part of any operating system. It is the "portion of the operating system code that is always resident in memory".[2] It facilitates interactions between hardware and software components. On most systems, it is one of the first programs loaded on startup (after the bootloader). It handles the rest of startup as well as input/output (I/O) requests from software, translating them into data-processing instructions for the central processing unit. It handles memory and peripherals like keyboards, monitors, printers, and speakers. The critical code of the kernel is usually loaded into a separate area of memory, which is protected from access by application programs or other, less critical parts of the operating system
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Windows Explorer
File Explorer, previously known as Windows Explorer, is a file manager application that is included with releases of the Microsoft Windows operating system from Windows 95 onwards. It provides a graphical user interface for accessing the file systems. It is also the component of the operating system that presents many user interface items on the screen such as the taskbar and desktop. Controlling the computer is possible without Windows Explorer running (for example, the File | Run command in Task Manager on NT-derived versions of Windows will function without it, as will commands typed in a command prompt window). Windows Explorer was first included with Windows 95 as a replacement for File Manager, which came with all versions of Windows 3.x operating systems. Explorer could be accessed by double-clicking the new My Computer desktop icon, or launched from the new Start Menu that replaced the earlier Program Manager
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Blob (computing)
A Binary Large OBject (BLOB) is a collection of binary data stored as a single entity in a database management system. Blobs are typically images, audio or other multimedia objects, though sometimes binary executable code is stored as a blob. Database support for blobs is not universal. Blobs were originally just big amorphous chunks of data invented by Jim Starkey at DEC, who describes them as "the thing that ate Cincinnati, Cleveland, or whatever" from "the 1958 Steve McQueen movie",[1] referring to The Blob. Later, Terry McKiever, a marketing person for Apollo, felt that it needed to be an acronym and invented the backronym Basic Large Object
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]