HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Computer Worm
A computer worm is a standalone malware computer program that replicates itself in order to spread to other computers.[1] Often, it uses a computer network to spread itself, relying on security failures on the target computer to access it. Worms almost always cause at least some harm to the network, even if only by consuming bandwidth, whereas viruses almost always corrupt or modify files on a targeted computer. Many worms that have been created are designed only to spread, and do not attempt to change the systems they pass through
[...More...]

"Computer Worm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Write Once Read Many
Write once read many (WORM) describes a data storage device in which information, once written, cannot be modified. This write protection affords the assurance that the data cannot be tampered with once it is written to the device. On ordinary (non-WORM) data storage devices, the number of times data can be modified is limited only by the lifespan of the device, as modification involves physical changes that may cause wear to the device. The "read many" aspect is unremarkable, as modern storage devices permit unlimited reading of data once written.[Note 1]Contents1 History 2 Current WORM drives 3 Research 4 Notes 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] WORM drives preceded the invention of the CD-R
CD-R
and DVD-R
[...More...]

"Write Once Read Many" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Computer History Museum
The Computer History Museum
Museum
(CHM) is a museum established in 1996 in Mountain View, California, US. The museum is dedicated to preserving and presenting the stories and artifacts of the information age, and exploring the computing revolution and its impact on society.Contents1 History 2 Collections and exhibition space 3 Fellows 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] The museum's origins date to 1968 when Gordon Bell
Gordon Bell
began a quest for a historical collection and, at that same time, others were looking to preserve the Whirlwind computer. The resulting Museum
Museum
Project had its first exhibit in 1975, located in a converted coat closet in a DEC lobby. In 1978, the museum, now The Digital Computer Museum
Museum
(TDCM), moved to a larger DEC lobby in Marlborough, Massachusetts
[...More...]

"Computer History Museum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Network Switch
A network switch (also called switching hub, bridging hub, officially MAC bridge[1]) is a computer networking device that connects devices together on a computer network by using packet switching to receive, process, and forward data to the destination device. A network switch is a multiport network bridge that uses hardware addresses to process and forward data at the data link layer (layer 2) of the OSI model. Some switches can also process data at the network layer (layer 3) by additionally incorporating routing functionality. Such switches are commonly known as layer-3 switches or multilayer switches.[2] Switches for Ethernet
Ethernet
are the most common form of network switch
[...More...]

"Network Switch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

TCP Wrapper
TCP Wrapper is a host-based networking ACL system, used to filter network access to Internet Protocol servers on (Unix-like) operating systems such as Linux
Linux
or BSD. It allows host or subnetwork IP addresses, names and/or ident query replies, to be used as tokens on which to filter for access control purposes. The original code was written by Wietse Venema
Wietse Venema
in 1990 to monitor a cracker's activities on the Unix
Unix
workstations at the Dept. of Math and Computer Science at the Eindhoven University of Technology.[1] He maintained it until 1995, and on June 1, 2001, released it under its own BSD-style license. The tarball includes a library named libwrap that implements the actual functionality. Initially, only services that were spawned for each connection from a super-server (such as inetd) got wrapped, utilizing the tcpd program
[...More...]

"TCP Wrapper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Denial-of-service Attack
In computing, a denial-of-service attack (DoS attack) is a cyber-attack in which the perpetrator seeks to make a machine or network resource unavailable to its intended users by temporarily or indefinitely disrupting services of a host connected to the Internet. Denial of service is typically accomplished by flooding the targeted machine or resource with superfluous requests in an attempt to overload systems and prevent some or all legitimate requests from being fulfilled.[1] In a distributed denial-of-service attack (DDoS attack), the incoming traffic flooding the victim originates from many different sources. This effectively makes it impossible to stop the attack simply by blocking a single source. A DoS or DDoS attack is analogous to a group of people crowding the entry door of a shop, making it hard for legitimate customers to enter, disrupting trade. Criminal perpetrators of DoS attacks often target sites or services hosted on high-profile web servers such as banks or credit card
[...More...]

"Denial-of-service Attack" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ACL (software)
ACL Services Ltd. is a privately-owned software company headquartered in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ACL provides an enterprise SaaS platform that converges governance, risk management, and compliance (GRC), corporate performance management (CPM), and data automation. Their flagship analytics products have been referred to as one of "the most widely used" data extraction tools.[1] In 2018, ACL was named one of Canada's Top 100 Employers by Mediacorp Canada
Canada
Inc. [2]Contents1 History 2 Products & Services2.1 ACL GRC 2.2 ACL Analytics 2.3 ACL GRC Analytics Exchange 2.4 ACL GRC Content & Intelligence 2.5 Add-Ons3 Leadership 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] While working in the Faculty of Commerce's Division of Accounting at the University of British Columbia
University of British Columbia
in 1972, Hartmut J
[...More...]

"ACL (software)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Data Theft
Data theft is a growing phenomenon primarily caused by system administrators and office workers with access to technology such as database servers, desktop computers and a growing list of hand-held devices capable of storing digital information, such as USB flash drives, iPods and even digital cameras. Since employees often spend a considerable amount of time developing contacts and confidential and copyrighted information for the company they work for, they may feel they have some right to the information and are inclined to copy and/or delete part of it when they leave the company, or misuse it while they are still in employment. They can be sold and bought and then used by criminals and criminal organizations[1]
[...More...]

"Data Theft" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Daemon (computer Software)
In multitasking computer operating systems, a daemon (/ˈdiːmən/ or /ˈdeɪmən/)[1] is a computer program that runs as a background process, rather than being under the direct control of an interactive user. Traditionally, the process names of a daemon end with the letter d, for clarification that the process is, in fact, a daemon, and for differentiation between a daemon and a normal computer program. For example, syslogd is the daemon that implements the system logging facility, and sshd is a daemon that serves incoming SSH connections. In a Unix
Unix
environment, the parent process of a daemon is often, but not always, the init process. A daemon is usually either created by a process forking a child process and then immediately exiting, thus causing init to adopt the child process, or by the init process directly launching the daemon
[...More...]

"Daemon (computer Software)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nullroute
In computer networking, a null route (blackhole route) is a network route (routing table entry) that goes nowhere. Matching packets are dropped (ignored) rather than forwarded, acting as a kind of very limited firewall. The act of using null routes is often called blackhole filtering. The rest of this article deals with null routing in the Internet Protocol
Internet Protocol
(IP). Null routes are typically configured with a special route flag, but can also be implemented by forwarding packets to an illegal IP address such as 0.0.0.0, or the loopback address. Null routing has an advantage over classic firewalls since it is available on every potential network router (including all modern operating systems), and adds virtually no performance impact. Due to the nature of high-bandwidth routers, null routing can often sustain higher throughput than conventional firewalls
[...More...]

"Nullroute" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

CERT Coordination Center
The CERT Coordination Center
CERT Coordination Center
(CERT/CC) is the coordination center of the computer emergency response team (CERT) for the Software Engineering Institute (SEI), a non-profit United States federally funded research and development center
[...More...]

"CERT Coordination Center" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

IEEE
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers
(IEEE) is a professional association with its corporate office in New York City and its operations center in Piscataway, New Jersey. It was formed in 1963 from the amalgamation of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers and the Institute of Radio Engineers. Today, it is the world's largest association of technical professionals with more than 420,000 members in over 160 countries around the world
[...More...]

"IEEE" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Xerox PARC
PARC (Palo Alto Research Center Incorporated), formerly Xerox
Xerox
PARC, is a research and development company in Palo Alto, California,[1][2][3] with a distinguished reputation for its contributions to information technology and hardware systems.[citation needed] Founded in 1970 as a division of Xerox
[...More...]

"Xerox PARC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cornell University
Cornell University
University
(/kɔːrˈnɛl/ kor-NEL) is a private and statutory Ivy League
Ivy League
research university located in Ithaca, New York. Founded in 1865 by Ezra Cornell
Ezra Cornell
and Andrew Dickson White,[7] the university was intended to teach and make contributions in all fields of knowledge—from the classics to the sciences, and from the theoretical to the applied. These ideals, unconventional for the time, are captured in Cornell's motto, a popular 1865 Ezra Cornell quotation: "I would found an institution where any person can find instruction in any study."[1] The university is broadly organized into seven undergraduate colleges and seven graduate divisions at its main Ithaca campus, with each college and division defining its own admission standards and academic programs in near autonomy
[...More...]

"Cornell University" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Router (computing)
A router[a] is a networking device that forwards data packets between computer networks. Routers perform the traffic directing functions on the Internet. A data packet is typically forwarded from one router to another router through the networks that constitute an internetwork until it reaches its destination node.[2] A router is connected to two or more data lines from different networks.[b] When a data packet comes in on one of the lines, the router reads the network address information in the packet to determine the ultimate destination. Then, using information in its routing table or routing policy, it directs the packet to the next network on its journey. The most familiar type of routers are home and small office routers that simply forward IP packets between the home computers and the Internet
[...More...]

"Router (computing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

CEO
Chief executive officer (CEO)[1] is the position of the most senior corporate officer, executive, leader or administrator in charge of managing an organization – especially an independent legal entity such as a company or nonprofit institution. CEOs lead a range of organizations, including public and private corporations, non-profit organizations and even some government organizations (e.g., Crown corporations). The CEO of a corporation or company typically reports to the board of directors and is charged with maximizing the value of the entity,[1] which may include maximizing the share price, market share, revenues, or another element. In the non-profit and government sector, CEOs typically aim at achieving outcomes related to the organization's mission, such as reducing poverty, increasing literacy, etc
[...More...]

"CEO" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.