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Computer History Museum
The Computer History Museum
Museum
(CHM) is a museum established in 1996 in Mountain View, California, US. The museum is dedicated to preserving and presenting the stories and artifacts of the information age, and exploring the computing revolution and its impact on society.Contents1 History 2 Collections and exhibition space 3 Fellows 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] The museum's origins date to 1968 when Gordon Bell
Gordon Bell
began a quest for a historical collection and, at that same time, others were looking to preserve the Whirlwind computer. The resulting Museum
Museum
Project had its first exhibit in 1975, located in a converted coat closet in a DEC lobby. In 1978, the museum, now The Digital Computer Museum
Museum
(TDCM), moved to a larger DEC lobby in Marlborough, Massachusetts
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America Flag Coat of arms Motto: "In God
God
We Trust"[1][a] .mw-parser-ou
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Programming Language
A programming language is a formal language that specifies a set of instructions that can be used to produce various kinds of output. Programming languages generally consist of instructions for a computer. Programming languages can be used to create programs that implement specific algorithms. The earliest known programmable machine that preceded the invention of the digital computer was the automatic flute player described in the 9th century by the brothers Musa in Baghdad, during the Islamic Golden Age.[1] From the early 1800s, "programs" were used to direct the behavior of machines such as Jacquard looms, music boxes and player pianos.[2] Thousands of different programming languages have been created, mainly in the computer field, and many more still are being created every year
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Kitchen Computer
The Honeywell
Honeywell
316 was a popular 16-bit minicomputer built by Honeywell starting in 1969. It is part of the Series 16, which includes the Models 116, 316, 416, 516 and 716. They were commonly used for data acquisition and control, remote message concentration, clinical laboratory systems, Remote Job Entry and time-sharing
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Neiman Marcus
Neiman Marcus, originally Neiman-Marcus, is an American department store owned by the Neiman Marcus
Neiman Marcus
Group, headquartered in Dallas, Texas.[2] The company also owns the Bergdorf Goodman
Bergdorf Goodman
department stores and operates a direct marketing division, Neiman Marcus
Neiman Marcus
Direct, which operates catalog and online operations under the Horchow, Neiman Marcus, and Bergdorf Goodman
Bergdorf Goodman
names
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Web Server
Web server
Web server
refers to server software, or hardware dedicated to running said software, that can serve contents to the World Wide Web. A web server processes incoming network requests over the HTTP
HTTP
protocol (and several other related protocols).[1]Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Path translation 4 Kernel-mode and user-mode web servers 5 Load limits5.1 Causes of overload 5.2 Symptoms of overload 5.3 Anti-overload techniques6 Market share6.1 October 2017 6.2 February 2017 6.3 February 20167 See also 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit] The primary function of web server is to store, process and deliver web pages to clients. The communication between client and server takes place using the Hypertext Transfer Protocol
Hypertext Transfer Protocol
(HTTP)
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Cray-3
The Cray-3
Cray-3
was a vector supercomputer, Seymour Cray's designated successor to the Cray-2. The system was the first major application of gallium arsenide (GaAs) semiconductors in computing, using hundreds of custom built ICs packed into a 1 cubic foot (0.028 m3) CPU. The design goal was performance around 16 GFLOPS, about 12 times that of the Cray-2. Work started on the Cray-3
Cray-3
in 1988 at Cray
Cray
Research's (CRI) development labs in Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. Other teams at the lab were working on designs with similar performance. To focus the teams, the Cray-3
Cray-3
effort was moved to a new lab in Colorado Springs, Colorado later that year. Shortly thereafter, the corporate headquarters in Minneapolis
Minneapolis
decided to end work on the Cray-3
Cray-3
in favor of another design, the Cray
Cray
C90
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Cray-2
The Cray-2
Cray-2
is a supercomputer with four vector processors made by Cray Research starting in 1985. At 1.9 G FLOPS peak performance, it was the fastest machine in the world when it was released, replacing the Cray X-MP in that spot. It was, in turn, replaced in that spot by the Cray Y-MP in 1988. The Cray-2
Cray-2
was the first of Seymour Cray's designs to successfully use multiple CPUs. This had been attempted in the CDC 8600
CDC 8600
in the early 1970s, but the emitter-coupled logic (ECL) transistors of the era were too difficult to package into a working machine. The Cray-2
Cray-2
addressed this through the use of ECL integrated circuits, packing them in a novel 3D wiring that greatly increased circuit density. The dense packaging and resulting heat loads were a major problem for the Cray-2
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Science Museum (London)
3,251,000 (2017)[1]Ranked 6th nationallyDirector Ian BlatchfordPublic transit access South KensingtonWebsite sciencemuseum.org.ukScience Museum GroupNational Media Museum National Railway MuseumShildon Locomotion MuseumScience and Industry Science MuseumDana Library and Research Centre Science Museum at WroughtonThe Science Museum is a major museum on Exhibition Road
Exhibition Road
in South Kensington, London. It was founded in 1857 and today is one of the city's major tourist attractions, attracting 3.3 million visitors annually.[2] Like other publicly funded national museums in the United Kingdom, the Science Museum does not charge visitors for admission. Temporary exhibitions, however, may incur an admission fee
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Source Code
In computing, source code is any collection of computer instructions, possibly with comments, written using[1] a human-readable programming language, usually as plain text. The source code of a program is specially designed to facilitate the work of computer programmers, who specify the actions to be performed by a computer mostly by writing source code. The source code is often transformed by an assembler or compiler into binary machine code understood by the computer. The machine code might then be stored for execution at a later time. Alternatively, source code may be interpreted and thus immediately executed. Most application software is distributed in a form that includes only executable files
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Steve Russell (computer Scientist)
Superscript textLook up Russell
Russell
in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Russell
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Assembly Language
An assembly (or assembler) language,[1] often abbreviated asm, is a low-level programming language for a computer, or other programmable device, in which there is a very strong (but often not one-to-one) correspondence between the language and the architecture's machine code instructions. Each assembly language is specific to a particular computer architecture. In contrast, most high-level programming languages are generally portable across multiple architectures but require interpreting or compiling. Assembly language
Assembly language
may also be called symbolic machine code.[2] Assembly language
Assembly language
is converted into executable machine code by a utility program referred to as an assembler. The conversion process is referred to as assembly, or assembling the source code
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Pascal (programming Language)
Pascal is an imperative and procedural programming language, designed by Niklaus Wirth
Niklaus Wirth
as a small, efficient language intended to encourage good programming practices using structured programming and data structuring. It is named in honor of the French mathematician, philosopher and physicist Blaise Pascal. Pascal was developed on the pattern of the ALGOL 60 language. Wirth was involved in the process to improve the language as part of the ALGOL X efforts and proposed a version known as ALGOL W. This was not accepted, and the ALGOL X process bogged down. In 1968, Wirth decided to abandon the ALGOL X process and further improve ALGOL W, releasing this as Pascal in 1970. Pascal became very successful in the 1970s, notably on the burgeoning minicomputer market. Compilers were also available for many microcomputers as the field emerged in the late 1970s
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Adobe Systems, Inc.
Coordinates: 37°19′50″N 121°53′38″W / 37.3306844°N 121.8939647°W / 37.3306844; -121.8939647 Adobe Systems
Adobe Systems
Incorporated Adobe Systems
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Google (search Engine)
Google
Google
Search, commonly referred to as Google
Google
Web Search or simply Google, is a web search engine developed by Google. It is the most-used search engine on the World Wide Web,[5] handling more than three billion searches each day.[6][7] As of February 2016[update], it is the most used search engine in the US with 64.0% market share.[8] The order of search results returned by Google
Google
is based, in part, on a priority rank system called "PageRank"
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Boston
Boston
Boston
(/ˈbɒstən/ ( listen) BOS-tən) is the capital city and most populous municipality[9] of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in the United States
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