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Compass Rose
A compass rose, sometimes called a windrose or Rose of the Winds, is a figure on a compass, map, nautical chart, or monument used to display the orientation of the cardinal directions (north, east, south, and west) and their intermediate points. It is also the term for the graduated markings found on the traditional magnetic compass. Today, the idea of a compass rose is found on, or featured in, almost all navigation systems, including nautical charts, non-directional beacons (NDB), VHF omnidirectional range
VHF omnidirectional range
(VOR) systems, global-positioning systems (GPS), and similar equipment. Compass
Compass
rose with the eight principal windsThe modern compass rose has eight principal winds
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Einhard
Einhard
Einhard
(also Eginhard or Einhart; Latin: Einhardus; c. 775 – March 14, 840 AD) was a Frankish scholar and courtier. Einhard
Einhard
was a dedicated servant of Charlemagne
Charlemagne
and his son Louis the Pious; his main work is a biography of Charlemagne, the Vita Karoli Magni, "one of the most precious literary bequests of the early Middle Ages."[1]Contents1 Public life 2 Private life 3 Religious beliefs 4 Local lore 5 Works 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksPublic life[edit] Einhard
Einhard
was from the eastern German-speaking part of the Frankish Kingdom
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GPS
The Global Positioning System
System
(GPS), originally Navstar GPS,[1] is a satellite-based radionavigation system owned by the United States government and operated by the United States
United States
Air Force.[2] It is a global navigation satellite system that provides geolocation and time information to a GPS receiver
GPS receiver
anywhere on or near the Earth
Earth
where there is an unobstructed line of sight to four or more GPS satellites.[3] Obstacles such as mountains and buildings block the relatively weak GPS
GPS
signals. The GPS
GPS
does not require the user to transmit any data, and it operates independently of any telephonic or internet reception, though these technologies can enhance the usefulness of the GPS
GPS
positioning information
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Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Anemoi
In ancient Greek religion and myth, the Anemoi
Anemoi
(Greek: Ἄνεμοι, "Winds")[n 1] were wind gods who were each ascribed a cardinal direction from which their respective winds came (see Classical compass winds), and were each associated with various seasons and weather conditions.Contents1 Mythology1.1 Boreas 1.2 Aquilo 1.3 Zephyrus 1.4 Notus 1.5 Eurus2 Lesser winds 3 Popular culture 4 See also 5 Notes and references 6 Sources 7 External linksMythology[edit] They are minor gods and are subject to the god Aeolus. They were sometimes represented as mere gusts of wind, at other times were personified as winged men, and at still other times were depicted as horses kept in the stables of the storm god Aeolus, who provided Odysseus
Odysseus
with the Anemoi
Anemoi
in the Odyssey
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Meteorology
Atmospheric physics Atmospheric dynamics (category) Atmospheric chemistry
Atmospheric chemistry
(category)Meteorology Weather
Weather
(category) · (portal) Tropical cyclone
Tropical cyclone
(category)Climatology Climate
Climate
(category) Climate
Climate
change (category) Global warming
Global warming
(category) · (portal)v t e Meteorology
Meteorology
is a branch of the atmospheric sciences which includes atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric physics, with a major focus on weather forecasting. The study of meteorology dates back millennia, though significant progress in meteorology did not occur until the 18th century. The 19th century saw modest progress in the field after weather observation networks were formed across broad regions. Prior attempts at prediction of weather depended on historical data
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Aristotle
Aristotle
Aristotle
(/ˈærɪˌstɒtəl/;[3] Greek: Ἀριστοτέλης Aristotélēs, pronounced [aristotélɛːs]; 384–322 BC)[n 1] was an ancient Greek philosopher and scientist born in the city of Stagira, Chalkidiki, in the north of Classical Greece. Along with Plato, Aristotle
Aristotle
is considered the "Father of Western Philosophy", which inherited almost its entire lexicon from his teachings, including problems and methods of inquiry, so influencing almost all forms of knowledge. Little is known for certain about his life. His father, Nicomachus, died when Aristotle
Aristotle
was a child, and he was brought up by a guardian. At seventeen or eighteen years of age, he joined Plato's Academy
Plato's Academy
in Athens and remained there until the age of thirty-seven (c
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Arctic Circle
The Arctic
Arctic
Circle is the most northerly of the five major circles of latitude as shown on maps of Earth. It marks the northernmost point at which the noon sun is just visible on the December solstice
December solstice
and the southernmost point at which the midnight sun is just visible on the June solstice. The region north of this circle is known as the Arctic, and the zone just to the south is called the Northern Temperate Zone. As seen from the Arctic, the Sun
Sun
is above the horizon for 24 continuous hours at least once per year (and therefore visible at midnight) and below the horizon for 24 continuous hours at least once per year (and therefore not visible at noon)
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Mistral (wind)
The mistral (Catalan: Mestral, Greek: Μαΐστρος, Italian: Maestrale, Croatian:Maestral) is a strong, cold, northwesterly wind that blows from southern France into the Gulf of Lion in the northern Mediterranean, with sustained winds often exceeding 66 km/h (41 mph), sometimes reaching 185 km/h (115 mph).[1] It is most common in the winter and spring, and strongest in the transition between the two seasons
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Summer Solstice
The summer solstice (or estival solstice), also known as midsummer, occurs when a planet's rotational axis, or geographical pole on either its northern or its Southern Hemisphere, is most inclined toward the star that it orbits. On the summer solstice, Earth's maximum axial tilt toward the Sun
Sun
is 23.44°. (Likewise, the Sun's declination from the celestial equator is +23.44° in the Northern Celestial Hemisphere and −23.44° in the Southern Celestial Hemisphere.) This happens twice each year (once in each hemisphere), when the Sun
Sun
reaches its highest position in the sky as seen from the North or South Pole. The summer solstice occurs during the hemisphere's summer.[2] This is the June solstice in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and the December solstice in the Southern Hemisphere
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Libeccio
The libeccio (/lɪˈbɛtʃioʊ/; Italian: [liˈbettʃo]; Croatian: lebić [lěbitɕ]; Catalan: llebeig [ʎəˈβɛtʃ]; Greek: λίβας [ˈlivas]; Serbian: lebić, [lěbitɕ])[a] is the westerly or south-westerly wind which predominates in northern Corsica
Corsica
all year round; it frequently raises high seas and may give violent westerly squalls. In summer it is most persistent, but in winter it alternates with the Tramontane
Tramontane
(north-east or north)
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Ostro
Ostro
Ostro
(Catalan: Migjorn, Croatian: Oštro, Greek: Όστρια, Montenegrin: Oštrijal), or Austro, is a southerly wind in the Mediterranean Sea, especially the Adriatic. Its name is Italian, derived from the Latin name Auster, which also meant a southerly wind. It is a warm and humid wind that often carries rain, but it is also sometimes identified with the Libeccio
Libeccio
and Scirocco. External links[edit]List of wind names (in German)v t eCompass directionCardinal and ordinal directionsNorth Northeast East Southeast South Southwest West NorthwestThe eight principal windsTramontane Gregale Levant Sirocco Ostro Libeccio Ponente MistralThis climatology/meteorology–related article is a stub
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Sirocco
Sirocco, scirocco, /sɪˈrɒkoʊ/, jugo or, rarely, siroc (Catalan: Xaloc, Greek: Σορόκος, Spanish: Siroco, Occitan: Siròc, Eisseròc, Croatian: Jugo, literally southerly , Libyan Arabic: Ghibli, Egypt: khamsin, Tunisia: ch'hilli) is a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
wind that comes from the Sahara
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Levant (wind)
The levant (Catalan: Llevant, Italian: Levante, Croatian: Levant, Maltese: Lvant, Greek: Λεβάντες, Spanish: Levante) is an easterly wind that blows in the western Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
and southern France, an example of mountain-gap wind. In Roussillon it is called "llevant" and in Corsica "levante". In the western Mediterranean, particularly when the wind blows through the Strait of Gibraltar, it is called the Viento de Levante or the Levanter. It is also known as the Solano. When blowing moderately or strongly, the levant causes heavy swells on the Mediterranean. Usually gentle and damp, the levant frequently brings clouds and rain. When it brings good weather, it is known as the "levant blanc".[1] The origin of the name is the same as the origin of the Levant, the region of the eastern Mediterranean: it is the Middle French word "levant", the participle of lever "to raise" — as in soleil levant "rising sun" — from the Latin levare
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Grecale (wind)
The Gregale (Catalan: Gregal, Italian: Grecale, Lombard: Grecal, Maltese: Grigal, Occitan: Gregau, Greek: Γραίγος, Graigos) is a Mediterranean wind that can occur during times when a low-pressure area moves through the area to the south of Malta and causes a strong, cool, northeasterly wind to affect the island
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Tramontane
Tramontane
Tramontane
/trəˈmɒnteɪn/[a] is a classical name for a northern wind. The exact form of the name and precise direction varies from country to country. The word came to English from Italian tramontana, which developed from Latin trānsmontānus (trāns- + montānus), "beyond/across the mountains",[1] referring to the Alps
Alps
in the North of Italy
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