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Commodore 64
The Commodore 64, also known as the C64 or the CBM 64, is an 8-bit home computer introduced in January 1982 by Commodore International (first shown at the Consumer Electronics Show, in Las Vegas, January 7–10, 1982).[5] It has been listed in the Guinness World Records
Guinness World Records
as the highest-selling single computer model of all time,[6] with independent estimates placing the number sold between 10 and 17 million units.[3] Volume production started in early 1982, marketing in August for US$595 (equivalent to $1,509 in 2017).[7][8] Preceded by the Commodore VIC-20
Commodore VIC-20
and Commodore PET, the C64 took its name from its 64 kilobytes (65,536 bytes) of RAM
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Software
Computer software, or simply software, is a part of a computer system that consists of data or computer instructions, in contrast to the physical hardware from which the system is built. In computer science and software engineering, computer software is all information processed by computer systems, programs and data. Computer software includes computer programs, libraries and related non-executable data, such as online documentation or digital media. Computer hardware
Computer hardware
and software require each other and neither can be realistically used on its own. At the lowest level, executable code consists of machine language instructions specific to an individual processor—typically a central processing unit (CPU). A machine language consists of groups of binary values signifying processor instructions that change the state of the computer from its preceding state
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Ford Model T
The Ford Model T
Model T
(colloquially known as the Tin Lizzie, Leaping Lena, or flivver) is an automobile produced by Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
from October 1, 1908, to May 26, 1927.[6][7] It is generally regarded as the fir
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Vertical Integration
In microeconomics and management, vertical integration is an arrangement in which the supply chain of a company is owned by that company. Usually each member of the supply chain produces a different product or (market-specific) service, and the products combine to satisfy a common need. It is contrasted with horizontal integration, wherein a company produces several items which are related to one another. Vertical integration
Vertical integration
has also described management styles that bring large portions of the supply chain not only under a common ownership, but also into one corporation (as in the 1920s when the Ford River Rouge Complex
Ford River Rouge Complex
began making much of its own steel rather than buying it from suppliers). Vertical integration
Vertical integration
and expansion is desired because it secures the supplies needed by the firm to produce its product and the market needed to sell the product
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Consumer Electronics
Consumer electronics
Consumer electronics
or home electronics are electronic (analog or digital) equipments intended for everyday use, typically in private homes. Consumer electronics
Consumer electronics
include devices used for entertainment (flatscreen TVs, DVD players, video games, remote control cars, etc.), communications (telephones, cell phones, e-mail-capable laptops, etc.), and home-office activities (e.g., desktop computers, printers, paper shredders, etc.)
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Apple II
The Apple II
Apple II
(stylized as Apple ][) is an 8-bit home computer, one of the first highly successful mass-produced microcomputer products,[4] designed primarily by Steve Wozniak
Steve Wozniak
( Steve Jobs
Steve Jobs
oversaw the development of the Apple II's foam-molded plastic case[5] and Rod Holt developed the switching power supply).[6] It was introduced in 1977 at the West Coast Computer Faire
West Coast Computer Faire
by Jobs and was the first consumer product sold by Apple Computer, Inc
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Byte
The byte (/baɪt/) is a unit of digital information that most commonly consists of eight bits. Historically, the byte was the number of bits used to encode a single character of text in a computer[1][2] and for this reason it is the smallest addressable unit of memory in many computer architectures. The size of the byte has historically been hardware dependent and no definitive standards existed that mandated the size – byte-sizes from 1[3] to 48 bits[4] are known to have been used in the past. Early character encoding systems often used six bits, and machines using six-bit and nine-bit bytes were common into the 1960s. These machines most commonly had memory words of 12, 24, 36, 48 or 60 bits, corresponding to two, four, six, eight or 10 six-bit bytes
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Guinness World Records
Guinness
Guinness
World Records, known from its inception in 1955 until 2000 as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of Records and in previous United States
United States
editions as The Guinness
Guinness
Book of World Records, is a reference book published annually, listing world records both of human achievements and the extremes of the natural world. The brainchild of Sir Hugh Beaver, the book was co-founded by brothers Norris and Ross McWhirter in Fleet Street, London in August 1954. The book itself holds a world record, as the best-selling copyrighted book of all time. As of the 2017 edition, it is now in its 62nd year of publication, published in 100 countries and 23 languages. The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums
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RS-232
In telecommunications, RS-232, Recommended Standard 232[1] is a standard introduced in 1960[2] for serial communication transmission of data. It formally defines the signals connecting between a DTE (data terminal equipment) such as a computer terminal, and a DCE (data circuit-terminating equipment or data communication equipment), such as a modem. The RS-232
RS-232
standard had been commonly used in computer serial ports. The standard defines the electrical characteristics and timing of signals, the meaning of signals, and the physical size and pinout of connectors
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General Purpose Input/Output
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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Operating System
An operating system (OS) is system software that manages computer hardware and software resources and provides common services for computer programs. Time-sharing
Time-sharing
operating systems schedule tasks for efficient use of the system and may also include accounting software for cost allocation of processor time, mass storage, printing, and other resources. For hardware functions such as input and output and memory allocation, the operating system acts as an intermediary between programs and the computer hardware,[1][2] although the application code is usually executed directly by the hardware and frequently makes system calls to an OS function or is interrupted by it
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Joystick
A joystick is an input device consisting of a stick that pivots on a base and reports its angle or direction to the device it is controlling. A joystick, also known as the control column, is the principal control device in the cockpit of many civilian and military aircraft, either as a center stick or side-stick. It often has supplementary switches to control various aspects of the aircraft's flight. Joysticks are often used to control video games, and usually have one or more push-buttons whose state can also be read by the computer. A popular variation of the joystick used on modern video game consoles is the analog stick. Joysticks are also used for controlling machines such as cranes, trucks, underwater unmanned vehicles, wheelchairs, surveillance cameras, and zero turning radius lawn mowers
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Electronic Filter
Electronic filters are circuits which perform signal processing functions, specifically to remove unwanted frequency components from the signal, to enhance wanted ones, or both. Electronic filters can be:passive or active analog or digital high-pass, low-pass, band-pass, band-stop (band-rejection; notch), or all-pass. discrete-time (sampled) or continuous-time linear or non-linear infinite impulse response (IIR type) or finite impulse response (FIR type)The most common types of electronic filters are linear filters, regardless of other aspects of their design
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Waveform
A waveform is the shape and form of a signal such as a wave moving in a physical medium or an abstract representation. In many cases, the medium in which the wave propagates does not permit a direct observation of the true form. In these cases, the term "waveform" refers to the shape of a graph of the varying quantity against time. An instrument called an oscilloscope can be used to pictorially represent a wave as a repeating image on a screen. To be more specific, a waveform is depicted by a graph that shows the changes in a recorded signal's amplitude over the duration of recording.[1] The amplitude of the signal is measured on the y displaystyle y -axis (vertical), and time on the x displaystyle x -axis (horizontal).[1]Contents1 Examples 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksExamples[edit] Most programs show waveforms to give the user a visual aid of what has been recorded
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Electronic Oscillator
An electronic oscillator is an electronic circuit that produces a periodic, oscillating electronic signal, often a sine wave or a square wave.[1][2] Oscillators convert direct current (DC) from a power supply to an alternating current (AC) signal. They are widely used in many electronic devices. Common examples of signals generated by oscillators include signals broadcast by radio and television transmitters, clock signals that regulate computers and quartz clocks, and the sounds produced by electronic beepers and video games.[1] Oscillators are often characterized by the frequency of their output signal:A low-frequency oscillator (LFO) is an electronic oscillator that generates a frequency below approximately 20 Hz
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Integrated Circuit
An integrated circuit or monolithic integrated circuit (also referred to as an IC, a chip, or a microchip) is a set of electronic circuits on one small flat piece (or "chip") of semiconductor material, normally silicon. The integration of large numbers of tiny transistors into a small chip results in circuits that are orders of magnitude smaller, cheaper, and faster than those constructed of discrete electronic components. The IC's mass production capability, reliability and building-block approach to circuit design has ensured the rapid adoption of standardized ICs in place of designs using discrete transistors. ICs are now used in virtually all electronic equipment and have revolutionized the world of electronics
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