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Committee Of Five
The Committee of Five
Committee of Five
of the Second Continental Congress
Second Continental Congress
was a team of five men who drafted and presented to the Congress what would become America's Declaration of Independence of July 4, 1776
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John Trumbull
John Trumbull
John Trumbull
(June 6, 1756 – November 10, 1843) was an American artist during the period of the American Revolutionary War and was notable for his historical paintings. He has been called "The Painter of the Revolution".[1] His Declaration of Independence (1817) was used on the reverse of the commemorative bicentennial two-dollar bill.Contents1 Early life 2 Revolutionary War 3 Postwar years 4 Middle years 5 Later years 6 Legacy and honors 7 Paintings 8 Gallery8.1 Historic events 8.2 Portraits 8.3 Miniature portraits9 In popular culture 10 See also 11 Notes 12 References 13 External linksEarly life[edit] Trumbull was born in Lebanon, Connecticut, in 1756, to Jonathan Trumbull and his wife Faith (née Robinson) Trumbull. His father served as Governor of Connecticut
Governor of Connecticut
from 1769 to 1784
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Preamble To The United States Constitution
The Preamble
Preamble
to the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
is a brief introductory statement of the Constitution's fundamental purposes and guiding principles
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Virginia
Virginia
Virginia
(/vərˈdʒɪniə/ ( listen); officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) is a state in the Southeastern[6] and Mid-Atlantic[7] regions of the United States
United States
located between the Atlantic Coast and the Appalachian Mountains. Virginia
Virginia
is nicknamed the "Old Dominion" due to its status as the first English colonial possession established in mainland North America,[8] and "Mother of Presidents" because eight U.S. presidents were born there, more than any other state. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains
Blue Ridge Mountains
and the Chesapeake Bay, which provide habitat for much of its flora and fauna. The capital of the Commonwealth is Richmond; Virginia Beach
Virginia Beach
is the most populous city, and Fairfax County is the most populous political subdivision
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John Locke
John Locke
John Locke
FRS (/lɒk/; 29 August 1632 – 28 October 1704) was an English philosopher and physician, widely regarded as one of the most influential of Enlightenment thinkers and commonly known as the "Father of Liberalism".[1][2][3] Considered one of the first of the British empiricists, following the tradition of Sir Francis Bacon, he is equally important to social contract theory. His work greatly affected the development of epistemology and political philosophy. His writings influenced Voltaire
Voltaire
and Jean-Jacques Rousseau, many Scottish Enlightenment thinkers, as well as the American revolutionaries
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Local Mean Time
Local mean time
Local mean time
is a form of solar time that corrects the variations of local apparent time, forming a uniform time scale at a specific longitude. This measurement of time was used for everyday use during the 19th century before time zones were introduced beginning in the late 19th century; it still has some uses in astronomy and navigation.[1] Past use[edit] Local mean time
Local mean time
was used from the early 19th century, when local solar time or sundial time was last used until standard time was adopted on various dates in the several countries. Each town or city kept its own meridian. This led to a situation where locations one degree of longitude apart had times four minutes apart.[2] This became a problem in the mid 19th century when railways needed clocks that were synchronized between stations, at the same time as people needed to match their clock (or the church clock) to the time tables
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Committee Of The Whole
A committee of the whole is a meeting of a deliberative assembly according to modified procedural rules based on those of a committee. The committee includes all members of the assembly, except that some officers may be replaced. As with other committees, the activities of a committee of the whole are limited to considering and making recommendations on matters that the assembly has referred to it; it cannot take up other matters, nor can it vote directly on the assembly's business. The purpose of a committee of the whole is to relax the usual limits on debate, allowing a more open exchange of views without the urgency of a final vote. Debates in a committee of the whole may be recorded, but are often excluded from the assembly's minutes
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Slave Trade
The history of slavery spans many cultures, nationalities, and religions from ancient times to the present day. However the social, economic, and legal positions of slaves were vastly different in different systems of slavery in different times and places.[1] Slavery
Slavery
can be traced back to the earliest records, such as the Mesopotamian
Mesopotamian
Code of Hammurabi
Code of Hammurabi
(c. 1860 BC), which refers to it as an established institution, and it was common among ancient peoples.[2] Slavery
Slavery
is rare among hunter-gatherer populations, because it is developed as a system of social stratification.[3][4] Slavery
Slavery
was known in the very first civilizations such as Sumer
Sumer
in Mesopotamia which dates back as far as 3500 BC, as well as in almost every other civilization
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John Dunlap
American Revolutionary WarBattle of Trenton Battle of PrincetonWhiskey Rebellion John Dunlap
John Dunlap
(1747 – November 27, 1812) was the printer of the first copies of the United States
United States
Declaration of Independence and one of the most successful American printers of his era. Biography[edit]Three pence note, printed by John Dunlap, Philadelphia, 1777Dunlap was born in Strabane, County Tyrone, Ireland
Ireland
(now Northern Ireland). In 1757, when he was ten years old, he went to work as an apprentice to his uncle, William Dunlap, a printer and bookseller in Philadelphia. In 1766, William Dunlap left the business in the care of his nephew. John eventually bought the business, and at first made a living by printing sermons and probably broadsides and handbills too. In November 1771, Dunlap began the publication of the Pennsylvania Packet, or General Advertiser, a weekly newspaper
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Charles Thomson
Charles Thomson
Charles Thomson
(November 29, 1729 – August 16, 1824) was an Irish-born Patriot leader in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
during the American Revolution and the secretary of the Continental Congress
Continental Congress
(1774–1789) throughout its existence.Contents1 Biography 2 Honors and memberships 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Thomson was born in Gorteade townland, Maghera
Maghera
parish, County Londonderry, Ireland, to Scots-Irish parents. After the death of his mother in 1739, his father, John Thomson, emigrated to the British colonies in America with Charles and two or three brothers. John Thomson died at sea, his possessions stolen, and the penniless boys were separated on arrival at New Castle, Delaware. Charles was first cared for by a blacksmith in New Castle, Delaware, and was educated in New London, Pennsylvania
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Article One Of The United States Constitution
Article One of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the legislative branch of the federal government, the United States Congress
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Article Two Of The United States Constitution
Article Two of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the executive branch of the federal government, which carries out and enforces federal laws
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Article Three Of The United States Constitution
Article Three of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
establishes the judicial branch of the federal government
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