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Commercial Sorghum
Commercial sorghum
Commercial sorghum
is the cultivation and commercial exploitation of species of grasses within the genus Sorghum
Sorghum
(often S. bicolor). These plants are used for grain, fibre and fodder. The plants are cultivated in warmer climates worldwide. Commercial Sorghum
Sorghum
species are native to tropical and subtropical regions of Africa
Africa
and Asia. Other names include durra, Egyptian millet, feterita, Guinea corn, jwari ज्वारी (Marathi), jowar, juwar, milo, shallu, Sudan grass, cholam (Tamil), jola (Kannada), jonnalu (Telugu), gaoliang (zh:高粱), great millet, kafir corn, dura, dari, mtama, and solam. Sorghum
Sorghum
has been, for centuries, one of the most important staple foods for millions of poor rural people in the semiarid tropics of Asia
Asia
and Africa
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Kaoliang Wine
Kaoliang wine, Gaoliang wine or sorghum wine is a strong distilled liquor of Chinese origin made from fermented sorghum. It is a type of unflavoured baijiu. The liquor originates from Dazhigu (大直沽, located east of Tianjin), first appearing in the Ming Dynasty. It is now primarily made and sold in mainland China and Taiwan and also popular in Korea, where it is called goryangju (hangul: 고량주; hanja: 高粱酒) or bbaegal (which is originated from Chinese character 白干).[1] Kaoliang is an important product of the islands Kinmen and Matsu which are part of Taiwan. Kaoliang ranges between 38 and 63 percent alcohol by volume.Contents1 Famous brands from Taiwan 2 In popular culture 3 See also 4 ReferencesFamous brands from Taiwan[edit]Kinmen 58% KaoliangKinmen Kaoliang Liquor (Chinese: 金門高粱酒; pinyin: Jīnmén Gāoliáng Jiǔ) is one of the most popular brands of kaoliang in Republic of China. As its name indicates, it is produced on the island of Kinmen
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Xerophyte
A xerophyte (from Greek ξηρός xeros dry, φυτόν phuton plant) is a species of plant that has adaptations to survive in an environment with little liquid water, such as a desert or an ice- or snow-covered region in the Alps
Alps
or the Arctic. Popular examples of xerophytes are cacti and pineapple plants. The structural features (morphology) and fundamental chemical processes (physiology) of xerophytes are variously adapted to conserve water, also commonly to store large quantities of water, during dry periods. Other species are able to survive long periods of extreme dryness or desiccation of their tissues, during which their metabolic activity may effectively shut down
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Kirman
Kerman
Kerman
( pronunciation (help·info)) (Persian: كرمان‎, also Romanized as Kermān, Kermun, and Kirman; also known as Carmania)[2] is the capital city of Kerman
Kerman
Province, Iran. At the 2011 census, its population was 821,374, in 221,389 households, making it the 10th most populous city of Iran.[3] It is the largest and most developed city in Kerman Province
Kerman Province
and the most important city in the southeast of Iran. It is also one of the largest cities of Iran
Iran
in terms of area. Kerman
Kerman
is famous for its long history and strong cultural heritage[citation needed]. The city is home to many historic mosques and Zoroastrian
Zoroastrian
fire temples. Kerman
Kerman
is also on the recent list of the world's 1000 cleanest cities[citation needed]
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Persia
Iran
Iran
(Persian: ایران‎ Irān [ʔiːˈɾɒːn] ( listen)), also known as Persia[10] (/ˈpɜːrʒə/),[11] officially the Islamic Republic
Islamic Republic
of Iran (Persian: جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ Jomhuri-ye Eslāmi-ye Irān ( listen)),[12] is a sovereign state in Western Asia.[13][14] With over 81 million inhabitants,[6] Iran
Iran
is the world's 18th-most-populous country.[15] Comprising a land area of 1,648,195 km2 (636,372 sq mi), it is the second-largest country in the Middle East
Middle East
and the 17th-largest in the world
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Muslim World
The terms Muslim
Muslim
world and Islamic world commonly refer to the unified Islamic community (Ummah), consisting of all those who adhere to the religion of Islam,[1] or to societies where Islam
Islam
is practiced.[2][3] In a modern geopolitical sense, these terms refer to countries where Islam
Islam
is widespread, although there are no agreed criteria for inclusion.[4][3] Some scholars and commentators have criticised the term 'Muslim/Islamic world' and its derivative terms 'Muslim/Islamic country' as "simplistic" and "binary", since no state has a religiously homogeneous population (e.g. Egypt's citizens are c
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Egypt
Coordinates: 26°N 30°E / 26°N 30°E / 26; 30Arab Republic
Republic
of Egyptجمهورية مصر العربيةArabic: Jumhūrīyat Miṣr al-ʿArabīyahEgyptian: Gomhoreyet Maṣr El ʿArabeyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Bilady, Bilady, Bilady" "بلادي، بلادي، بلادي" "My country, my country, my country"Capital and largest city Cairo 30°2′N 31°13′E / 30.033°N 31.217°E / 30.033; 31.217Official languages Arabic[a]National language Egyptian ArabicReligion90% Islam 9% Orthodox Christian 1% Other Christian[1]Demonym EgyptianGovernment Unitary semi-presidential republic• PresidentAbdel Fattah el-Sisi• Prime MinisterSherif IsmailLegislature House of RepresentativesEstablishment• Unification of Upper and Lower Egypt[2][3][b]c
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Islamic Spain
Al-Andalus
Al-Andalus
(Arabic: الأنْدَلُس‎, trans. al-ʼAndalus; Spanish: al-Ándalus; Portuguese: al-Ândalus; Catalan: al-Àndalus; Berber: Andalus), also known as Muslim Spain, Muslim Iberia, or Islamic Iberia, was a medieval Muslim territory and cultural domain occupying at its peak most of what are today Spain and Portugal. At its greatest geographical extent in the 8th century, a part of southern France—Septimania—was briefly under its control
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Sweet Sorghum
Sweet sorghum
Sweet sorghum
is any of the many varieties of the sorghum grass whose stalks have a high sugar content. Sweet sorghum
Sweet sorghum
thrives better under drier and warmer conditions than many other crops and is grown primarily for forage, silage, and syrup production. Although, in most of the United States the term molasses refers to a sweet syrup, made as a byproduct of sugarcane or sugar beet sugar extraction, sweet sorghum syrup is known as "sorghum molasses" in some regions of the U.S.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Cultivation 2 Uses 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCultivation[edit] Sweet sorghum
Sweet sorghum
has been widely cultivated in the U.S. since the 1850s for use in sweeteners, primarily in the form of sorghum syrup. By the early 1900s, the U.S. produced 20 million US gallons (76,000 m3) of sweet sorghum syrup annually
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Guinea (region)
Guinea
Guinea
is a traditional name for the region of the African coast of West Africa
Africa
which lies along the Gulf of Guinea. It is a naturally moist tropical forest or savanna that stretches along the coast and borders the Sahel
Sahel
belt in the north.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Subdivisions 4 Countries in Guinea 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The etymology of "Guinea" is uncertain. The English term Guinea
Guinea
comes directly from the Portuguese word Guiné, which emerged in the mid-15th century to refer to the lands inhabited by the Guineus, a generic term used by the Portuguese to refer to the 'black' African peoples living south of the Senegal River
Senegal River
(in contrast to the 'tawny' Sanhaja
Sanhaja
Berbers, north of it, whom they called Azenegues)
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Sorghum Syrup
Sweet sorghum is any of the many varieties of the sorghum grass whose stalks have a high sugar content. Sweet sorghum thrives better under drier and warmer conditions than many other crops and is grown primarily for forage, silage, and syrup production. Although, in most of the United States the term molasses refers to a sweet syrup, made as a byproduct of sugarcane or sugar beet sugar extraction, sweet sorghum syrup is known as "sorghum molasses" in some regions of the U.S.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Cultivation 2 Uses 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksCultivation[edit] Sweet sorghum has been widely cultivated in the U.S. since the 1850s for use in sweeteners, primarily in the form of sorghum syrup. By the early 1900s, the U.S. produced 20 million US gallons (76,000 m3) of sweet sorghum syrup annually. Making syrup from sorghum (as from sugar cane) is heavily labor-intensive
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Somalian Cuisine
Somali cuisine varies from region to region and is a fusion of different Somali culinary traditions, with some East African, Arab, Turkish and Italian influences. It is the product of Somalia's tradition of trade and commerce. Some notable Somali delicacies include sabayad, lahoh/injera, halva, sambuusa, and Muqmaad (beef jerky).Contents1 Breakfast 2 Lunch 3 Dinner 4 Snacks 5 Sweets 6 After-meal 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksBreakfast[edit]Canjeero is a staple bread in Somali cuisine.Breakfast (quraac) is an important meal for Somalis, who often start the day with some style of tea (shaah) or coffee (qaxwa). The tea is often in the form of haleeb shai (Yemeni milk tea) in the north. The main dish is typically a pancake-like bread (canjeero or canjeelo) similar to Ethiopian injera, but smaller and thinner
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Alcoholic Beverage
An alcoholic drink, or alcoholic beverage, is a drink that contains alcohol (ethanol), a depressant which in low doses causes euphoria, reduced anxiety, and sociability and in higher doses causes drunkenness, stupor and unconsciousness. Long-term use can lead to alcohol abuse, physical dependence, and alcoholism. Drinking alcohol plays an important social role in many cultures. Most countries have laws regulating the production, sale, and consumption of alcoholic beverages.[1] Some countries ban such activities entirely, but alcoholic drinks are legal in most parts of the world. The global alcoholic drink industry exceeded $1 trillion in 2014.[2] Alcohol
Alcohol
is one of the most widely used recreational drugs in the world
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Arid
A region is arid when it is characterized by a severe lack of available water, to the extent of hindering or preventing the growth and development of plant and animal life. Environments subject to arid climates tend to lack vegetation and are called xeric or desertic. Most "arid" climates surround the equator; these places include most of Africa
Africa
and parts of South America, Central America
Central America
and Australia. Change over time[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (January 2008)The distribution of aridity observed at any one point in time is largely the result of the general circulation of the atmosphere. The latter does change significantly over time through climate change. For example, temperature increase (by 1.5–2.1 percent) across the Nile Basin over the next 30–40 years could change the region from semi-arid to arid, resulting in a significant reduction in agricultural land
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Food Crop
A crop is a plant or animal product that can be grown and harvested extensively for profit or subsistence.[1] Crop
Crop
may refer either to the harvested parts or to the harvest in a more refined state (husked, shelled, etc.). Most crops are cultivated in agriculture or aquaculture. A crop is usually expanded to include macroscopic fungus (e.g. mushrooms), or alga (algaculture). Most crops are harvested as food for humans or livestock (fodder crops). Some crops are gathered from the wild (including intensive gathering, e.g. ginseng). Important non-food crops include horticulture, floriculture and industrial crops. Horticulture
Horticulture
crops include plants used for other crops (e.g. fruit trees). Floriculture
Floriculture
crops include bedding plants, houseplants, flowering garden and pot plants, cut cultivated greens, and cut flowers
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