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Comics By Country
Comics
Comics
have followed different paths of development throughout the world.Contents1 Africa 2 Asia 3 Europe 4 North America 5 Oceania 6 South America 7 See alsoAfrica[edit]South AfricaAsia[edit]China and TaiwanHong KongIndia Japan (History) Philippines South Korea (Webtoon) ThailandEurope[edit] Main article: European comicsCzech Franco-Belgian (France and Belgium)Belgium ManfraGermany Hungary Italy Netherlands Poland Portugal Serbia Spain United KingdomWalesNorth America[edit]CanadaCanadian Whites QuébecMexico United StatesHistoryGolden
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Welsh Comics
The first Welsh-language comic was Ifor Owen's Hwyl which ran from 1949 to 1989.[1] Y Mabinogi is a graphic novel adaptation of the 2003 film, which is in turn based on the classic Welsh tales known as The Mabinogion. It is the first Welsh-language graphic novel, written by Wales-based writer/artist Mike Collins. References[edit]^ Stephens, Meic (31 May 2007). "Ifor Owen, Illustrator and teacher". The Independent
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Argentine Comics
Argentine comics (Spanish: historietas) are one of the most important comic traditions internationally, and the most important within Latin America,[1] living its "Golden Age" between the 1940s and the 1960s. Soon after, in 1970, the theorist Oscar Masotta synthesized its contributions in the development of their own models of action comics (Oesterheld, Hugo Pratt), humor comics (Divito, Quino) and folkloric comics (Walter Ciocca) and the presence of other artists (Hugo Pratt and Alberto Breccia).[2]Contents1 History1.1 Early years 1.2 Golden Age 1.3 Political instability 1.4 Renaissance 1.5 The rise of self-publishing2 Notable artists and writers 3 Notable comics 4 Conventions 5 References 6 Sources 7 External linksHistory[edit] Early years[edit]Front of Don Quijote magazine, circa 1890.The first cartoons to appear in Argentina were editorial cartoons in political satire magazines at the end of the 19th century
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Quebec Comics
Quebec comics (French: bande dessinée québécoise French pronunciation: ​[bɑ̃d dɛ.si.ne ke.be.kwaz] or BDQ) are French language comics produced primarily in the Canadian province of Quebec, and read both within and outside Canada, particularly in French-speaking Europe. In contrast to English language comics in Canada, which largely follow the American model, Quebec comics are mostly influenced by the trends in Franco-Belgian comics
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Comics In Mexico
Comics
Comics
culture in Mexico
Mexico
is far from being a modern phenomenon. Its roots may be traced back to many stages in Mexican history. Indeed, Mexican intellectuals such as Ilan Stavans
Ilan Stavans
agree that pre-Columbian codices and other ancient documents could be seen as primary sources of the comics culture in the country.[1]Contents1 Revolutionary times 2 The twenties, thirties and onward 3 The foreign sci-fi and fantasy boom 4 The asian invasion 5 Modern times 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksRevolutionary times[edit] Another important influence has been the work of José Guadalupe Posada whose satirical cartoons helped create a political identity of visual art
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American Comic Book
An American comic book
American comic book
is a thin periodical, typically 32-pages, containing comics content. While the form originated in 1933, American comic books first gained popularity after the 1938 publication of Action Comics, which included the debut of the superhero Superman. This was followed by a superhero boom that lasted until the end of World War II. After the war, while superheroes were marginalized, the comic book industry rapidly expanded, and genres such as horror, crime, and romance became popular. The 1950s saw a gradual decline, due to a shift away from print media in the wake of television[1] and the impact of the Comics
Comics
Code Authority.[1] The late 1950s and the 1960s saw a superhero revival, and superheroes remain the dominant character archetype in the 21st century. Since the later 20th century, comic books have gained note as collectible items
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History Of American Comics
The history of American comics began in the 19th century in the realm of mass print media and yellow journalism, where they served as a boon to mass readership.[1] In the 20th century, comics became an autonomous art medium[1] and an integral part of American culture.[2]Contents1 Overview1.1 Periodization schemes2 Origins: Victorian Age (1842–1897)2.1 Funnies3 See also 4 References 5 Bibliography 6 Further readingOverview[edit] The history of American comics started in 1842 with the translation of Rodolphe Töpffer's work: The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck.[3][4] Local artists took over this new medium and created the first American comics. But it is not until the development of daily newspapers that an important readership is reached through comic strips. The first years corresponded to the establishment of canonical codes (recurring character, speech balloons, etc.) and first genres (family strips, adventure tales)
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Golden Age Of Comic Books
The Golden Age of Comic Books
Golden Age of Comic Books
describes an era of American comic books from the late 1930s to circa 1950. During this time, modern comic books were first published and rapidly increased in popularity
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Silver Age Of Comic Books
The Silver Age of Comic Books
Silver Age of Comic Books
was a period of artistic advancement and commercial success in mainstream American comic books, predominantly those in the superhero genre. Following the Golden Age of Comic Books and an interregnum in the early to mid-1950s, the Silver Age is considered to cover the period from 1956 to circa 1970, and was succeeded by the Bronze and Modern Ages.[1] The popularity and circulation of comic books about superheroes declined following World War II, and comic books about horror, crime and romance took larger shares of the market. However, controversy arose over alleged links between comic books and juvenile delinquency, focusing in particular on crime and horror titles
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Bronze Age Of Comic Books
The Bronze Age of Comic Books
Bronze Age of Comic Books
is an informal name for a period in the history of American superhero comic books usually said to run from 1970 to 1985. It follows the Silver Age of Comic Books,[1] and is followed by the Modern Age of Comic Books. The Bronze Age retained many of the conventions of the Silver Age, with traditional superhero titles remaining the mainstay of the industry
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Modern Age Of Comic Books
The Modern Age of Comic Books
Modern Age of Comic Books
is a period in the history of American superhero comic books which is generally considered to have begun in the mid-1980s and continues through the present day.[1][2] During the first half of this period, many comic book characters were redesigned, creators gained prominence in the industry, independent comics flourished, and larger publishing houses became more commercialized.[3] An alternative name for this period is the Dark Age of Comic Books, due to the popularity and artistic influence of titles with serious content, such as Batman: The Dark Knight Returns and Watchmen.[4]Contents1 Devel
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Events From The Modern Age Of Comic Books
One of the key aspects of the Modern Age of Comic Books was that it was the beginning of big events. In 1984, Marvel Comics debuted the first large crossover, Secret Wars, a storyline featuring the company's most prolific superheroes, which overlapped into a 12-issue limited series and many monthly comic books. A year later, DC Comics introduced its first large scale crossover, Crisis on Infinite Earths, which had long-term effects on the "DC Universe" continuity. In the early and mid-1990s, big events were regularly published by Marvel and DC, often leading to extra publicity and sales. These events helped fend-off competition from Image Comics, and such events were more likely to become "collector's items." Some events, such as DC's "Zero Hour" and Marvel's "Onslaught saga" spanned a publisher's entire line while others only affected a "family" of interrelated titles
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Comics In Australia
Australian comics have been published since 1908 and Australian comics creators have gone to produce influential work in the global comics industry (especially in American comics),Contents1 History1.1 1900s 1.2 1910s 1.3 1920s 1.4 1930s 1.5 1940s 1.6 1950s 1.7 1960s 1.8 1970s 1.9 1980s 1.10 1990s to present2 Australian comic book publishers2.1 Reprint publishers 2.2 Publishers of original content3 Awards 4 Conventions 5 Collections 6 See also 7 References 8 General references 9 External linksHistory[edit]This section possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations. Statements consisting only of original research should be removed
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Brazilian Comics
Brazilian comics started in the 19th century, adopting a satirical style known as cartoon, charges or caricature that would later be cemented in the popular comic strips. The publication of magazines dedicated exclusively to comics, in Brazil, started at the beginning of the 20th century. Brazilian artists have worked with both styles. In the case of American comics some have achieved international fame, like Roger Cruz with X-Men and Mike Deodato with Thor, Wonder Woman and others.Contents1 History1.1 Precursors and initial steps (1837–1895) 1.2 O Tico-Tico 1.3 Supplements and the creation of the Publishers2 Titles 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] Precursors and initial steps (1837–1895)[edit]First Brazil editorial cartoon, by Manuel de Araújo Porto-alegre (1837).Brazilian comics have a long history, that goes back to the 19th century
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Canadian Comics
Canadian comics
Canadian comics
refers to comics and cartooning by citizens of Canada or permanent residents of Canada
Canada
regardless of residence. Canada
Canada
has two official languages, and distinct comics cultures have developed in English and French Canada. The English tends to follow American trends, and the French Franco-Belgian ones,[1] with little crossover between the two cultures. Canadian comics
Canadian comics
run the gamut of comics forms, including editorial cartooning, comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, and webcomics, and are published in newspapers, magazines, books, and online. They have received attention in international comics communities[2] and have received support from the federal and provincial governments, including grants from the Canada Council for the Arts
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List Of Comic Books
This is a list of comic books, by country. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness
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