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Combat Shotgun
A combat shotgun is a shotgun that is intended for use in an offensive role, typically by a military force.[1] The earliest shotguns specifically designed for combat were the trench guns or trench shotguns issued in World War I. While limited in range, the multiple projectiles typically used in a shotgun shell provide increased hit probability unmatched by other small arms.[2]Contents1 History 2 Characteristics 3 Combat use 4 Effectiveness 5 Ammunition 6 Method of operation 7 Use in asymmetric warfare 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit]Confederate cavalryman with muzzle-loading shotgunWhile the sporting shotgun traces its ancestry back to the fowling piece, which was a refinement of the smoothbore musket, the combat shotgun bears more kinship to the shorter blunderbuss
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Periscope Rifle
A periscope rifle is a rifle that has been adapted to enable it to be sighted by the use of a periscope. This enables the shooter to remain concealed below cover. The device was independently invented by a number of individuals in response to the trench warfare conditions of the First World War, and while it is not clear which army was the first to use periscope rifles, the weapons were in use by the end of 1914.[1] Similar devices were also built for use with machine guns.[2][3]Contents1 Youlten hyposcope 2 Beech's periscope rifle 3 Other World War I rifles 4 See also4.1 Similar weapons5 References 6 External linksYoulten hyposcope[edit] The first periscope sighting rifle attachment was the Youlten hyposcope invented by W. Youlten. An early version of the attachment was tested in 1903, receiving its first patent in 1914
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Vietnam War
North Vietnamese victoryWithdrawal of American-led forces from Indochina Communist governments take power in South Vietnam, Cambodia
Cambodia
and Laos South Vietnam
South Vietnam
is annexed
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Bandolier
A bandolier or a bandoleer is a pocketed belt for holding ammunition. It is usually slung sash-style over the shoulder, with the ammunition pockets across the midriff and chest.[1] History[edit] In its original form, it was common issue to soldiers from the 16th century to the 18th century, and contained either pre-packed chargers, small containers of wood, metal or cloth containing the measured amount of gunpowder for a single shot with muzzle-loading muskets or other guns, or early forms of cartridges also containing a ball.[2] It might also carry grenades or other accessories for shooting. Any bag worn in the same style may also be described as a bandolier bag; similarly, ammunition holding pocketed belts worn round the waist may also be called bandoliers. A somewhat different form of the bandolier came into use in the 19th century, when it held more modern metallic cartridges and hand grenades
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Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
Douglas MacArthur
(26 January 1880 – 5 April 1964) was an American five-star general and Field Marshal of the Philippine Army. He was Chief of Staff of the United States Army
United States Army
during the 1930s and played a prominent role in the Pacific theater during World War II. He received the Medal of Honor
Medal of Honor
for his service in the Philippines Campaign, which made him and his father Arthur MacArthur Jr., the first father and son to be awarded the medal
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Pacific War
Allied victoryEnd of World War II Fall of the Japanese Empire Continuation of the Chinese Civil War 1951 Treaty of San Francisco Substantial weakening of European colonial powers and the gradual decolonization of AsiaTerritorial changesAllied occupation of JapanRemoval of all Japanese troops occupying parts of the Republic of China and the retrocession of Taiwan to China Liberation of Korea and Manchuria
Manchuria
from Japanese rule, followed by the division of Korea Cession of all Japanese-held islands in the Central
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Alexander Patch
General Alexander McCarrell "Sandy" Patch (November 23, 1889 – November 21, 1945) was a senior United States
United States
Army officer, who fought in both World War I
World War I
and World War II. During World War II
World War II
he commanded U.S. Army and U.S. Marine Corps
Corps
forces during the Guadalcanal Campaign, and the U.S. Seventh Army on the Western Front. He died in November 1945, a few months after the end of the war and two days before his 56th birthday. Patch was, along with James Van Fleet
James Van Fleet
and Lucian K
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Guadalcanal Campaign
Strategic Allied victoryBeginning of Allied Offensive Operations in the PacificBelligerents United States  Australia  New Zealand  United Kingdom British Solomon Islands[1] Colony of Fiji[2]  Tonga[3]  JapanCommanders and leaders U.S. Navy: Robert L. Ghormley William F. Halsey, Jr. Richmond K. Turner Frank J. Fletcher U.S. Marine Corps: Alexander A. Vandegrift Merritt A. Edson U.S. Army: Alexander M. Patch U.S. Coast Guard: Russell R. Waesche I.J. Navy: Isoroku Yamamoto Hiroaki Abe Nobutake Kondō Nishizo Tsukahara Takeo Kurita Jinichi Kusaka Shōji Nishimura Gunichi Mikawa Raizō Tanaka I.J
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Jungle Warfare
Jungle
Jungle
warfare is a term used to cover the special techniques needed for military units to survive and fight in jungle terrain. It has been the topic of extensive study by military strategists, and was an important part of the planning for both sides in many conflicts, including World War
War
II and the Vietnam War. The jungle has a variety of effects on military operations. Dense vegetation can limit lines of sight and arcs of fire, but can also provide ample opportunity for camouflage and plenty of material with which to build fortifications. Jungle
Jungle
terrain, often without good roads, can be inaccessible to vehicles and so makes supply and transport difficult, which in turn places a premium on air mobility
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Malayan Emergency
British/ Commonwealth
Commonwealth
victory Chin Peng
Chin Peng
exiled from Malaya.Territorial changes Independence of Malaya on 31 August 1957Belligerents
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Federation Of Malaya
The Federation of Malaya
Federation of Malaya
(Malay: Persekutuan Tanah Melayu; Jawi: ڤرسكوتوان تانه ملايو) was a federation of 11 states (nine Malay states
Malay states
and two of the British Straits Settlements, Penang and Malacca)[2] that existed from 1 February 1948 until 16 September 1963
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Urban Warfare
Urban warfare
Urban warfare
is combat conducted in urban areas such as towns and cities. Urban combat is very different from combat in the open at both the operational and tactical level. Complicating factors in urban warfare include the presence of civilians and the complexity of the urban terrain. Urban combat operations may be conducted in order to capitalize on the strategic or tactical advantages with which possession or control of a particular urban area gives or to deny these advantages to the enemy.[1] Fighting in urban areas negates the advantages that one side may have over the other in armour, heavy artillery, or air support
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Squad Automatic Weapon
A squad automatic weapon (colloquial: section automatic weapon [SAW]; light support weapon [LSW]) is a fully automatic firearm used to give infantry squads or sections a man-portable source of fully automatic firepower. Weapons used in this role are often selective fire rifles, usually fitted with a bipod and heavier barrel to perform as light machine guns. Squad
Squad
automatic weapons usually fire the same cartridge as the assault rifles or battle rifles carried by other members of the unit. This reduces logistical requirements by making it only necessary to supply one type of ammunition to a unit
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Tet Offensive
In phase 1: South Vietnam: 4,954 killed 15,917 wounded 926 missingOthers: 4,124 killed 19,295 wounded 604 missing Total casualties in Phase 1: Approximately 45,820 casualties (9,078 killed, 35,212 wounded, 1,530 missing)[7] [8] 123 aircraft destroyed, 214 heavily damaged and 215 medium damaged[9] Total 3 phases: unknownIn phase 1: Est
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Somali Civil War
Ongoing conflict[nb 1]Fall of the Supreme Revolutionary Council Consolidation of states Conflict between radical Islamists and the government De facto independence of Somaliland New governmentBelligerents1986–91: Somali Democratic Republic
Somali Democratic Republic
(until 1991)SNAAllied rebel groups:SNF (after 1991)1986–91: Armed rebel groups: SSDF SNM SPM USC1992–95:  United NationsUNOSOM I Unified Task Force UNOSOM II1992–93: USC2006–09: Transitional Federal Governm
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