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Yellow Rattle

Rhinanthus minor, the yellow rattle, little yellow rattle,[1] hayrattle or cockscomb, is a flowering plant in the genus Rhinanthus in the family Orobanchaceae, native to Europe, northern North America, and Western Asia.

Close-up of the flowers
Capsules and seeds
It is a hemi-parasitic herbaceous annual plant that gains some of its nutrients from the roots of neighbouring plants. It grows to 25–50 centimetres (9 3419 34 in) tall, with opposite, simple leaves, with a serrated margin. The flowers are yellow, produced on a terminal raceme. The fruit is a dry capsule, which contain loose, rattling seeds when ripe; the plant's name refers to these. Its preferred habitat is dry fields or meadows, where its flowering period is between June and September
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Morel

~70 worldwide (see text)

Morchella, the true morels, is a genus of edible sac fungi closely related to anatomically simpler cup fungi in the order Pezizales (division Ascomycota). These distinctive fungi have a honeycomb appearance due to the network of ridges with pits composing their caps. Morels are prized by gourmet cooks, particularly in French cuisine. Due to difficulties in cultivation, commercial harvesting of wild morels has become a multimillion-dollar industry in the temperate Northern Hemisphere, in particular North America, Turkey, China, the Himalayas, India, and Pakistan, where these highly prized fungi are found in abundance. Typified by Morchella esculenta in 1794, the genus has been the source of considerable taxonomical controversy throughout the years, mostly with regard to the number of species involved, with some mycologists recognising as few as three species and others over thirty
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Liver
The liver is an organ only found in vertebrates which detoxifies various metabolites, synthesizes proteins and produces biochemicals necessary for digestion and growth.[2][3][4] In humans, it is located in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen, below the diaphragm. Its other roles in metabolism include the regulation of glycogen storage, decomposition of red blood cells, and the production of hormones.[4] The liver is an accessory digestive organ that produces bile, an alkaline fluid containing cholesterol and bile acids, which helps the breakdown of fat
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Tagliatelle
Tagliatelle (Italian pronunciation: 
[taʎʎaˈtɛlle]; listen ) and tagliolini (from the Italian tagliare, meaning "to cut") are a traditional type of pasta from the Emilia-Romagna and Marche regions of Italy. Individual pieces of tagliatelle are long, flat ribbons that are similar in shape to fettuccine and are typically about 6.5 to 10 mm (0.26 to 0.39 in) wide.[citation needed] Tagliatelle can be served with a variety of sauces, though the classic is a meat sauce or Bolognese sauce
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Dim Sum

Dim sum (traditional Chinese: 點心; simplified Chinese: 点心; pinyin: diǎnxīn; Cantonese Yale: dímsām) is a large range of small dishes that Cantonese people traditionally enjoy in restaurants for breakfast and lunch.[1][2] In the tenth century, when the city of Guangzhou (Canton) began to experience an increase in commercial travel,[3] travelers concurrently began to frequent teahouses for small-portion meals with tea called yum cha, or "drink tea" meals.[4][3][5] Yum cha includes two related concepts.[6] The first is Yat jung Leung gin (一盅兩件), which translates literally as "one cup, two pieces". This refers to the custom of serving teahouse customers two pieces of delicately made food items, savory or sweet, to complement their tea. The second is dim sum (點心) and translates literally to "touching heart" (i.e
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Erythronium

Erythronium, the fawn lily, trout lily, dog's-tooth violet or adder's tongue, is a genus of Eurasian and North American plants in the lily family,[2][3][4][5][6] most closely related to tulips.[7] The name Erythronium derives from Ancient Greek ἐρυθρός (eruthrós) "red" in Greek, referring to the red flowers of E. dens-canis.[7]