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Columbia University Graduate School Of Journalism
The Columbia University
Columbia University
Graduate School of Journalism is the journalism school of Columbia University. It is located in Pulitzer Hall on Columbia's Morningside Heights campus in New York City. Founded in 1912 by Joseph Pulitzer, Columbia Journalism School is the only journalism school in the Ivy League
Ivy League
and one of the oldest in the world. It offers four degree programs: a master of science, master of arts, a variety of dual degrees including a master of science in journalism and computer science, and a doctor of philosophy in communications. The school houses the Pulitzer Prizes, arguably journalism's most prestigious award. It also administers several other prizes, including the Alfred I. duPont– Columbia University
Columbia University
Award, honoring excellence in broadcast and digital journalism in the public service
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Private School
Private schools, also known to many as independent schools, non-governmental, privately funded, or nonstate schools,[1] are not administered by local, state or national governments; parents of kids who attend private schools choose to have their child be in a school where kids are accordingly selected based on either their family income, religious background, or simply based on their academics. Private schools retain the right to select their students and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition, rather than relying on mandatory taxation through public (government) funding; at some private schools students may be able to get a scholarship, lowering this tuition fee, dependent on a student's talents or abilities (e.g. sport scholarship, art scholarship, academic scholarship), need for financial aid, or tax credit scholarships that might be available
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University Of Witwatersrand
The University
University
of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, is a multi-campus South African public research university[5] situated in the northern areas of central Johannesburg. It is more commonly known as Wits University
University
or Wits (pronunciation: vəts). The university has its roots in the mining industry, as do Johannesburg
Johannesburg
and the Witwatersrand in general
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William Howard Taft
William Howard Taft
William Howard Taft
(September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) served as the 27th President of the United States
President of the United States
(1909–1913) and as the tenth Chief Justice of the United States
Chief Justice of the United States
(1921–1930), the only person to have held both offices. Taft was elected president in 1908, the chosen successor of Theodore Roosevelt, but was defeated for re-election by Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
in 1912 after Roosevelt split the Republican vote by running as a third-party candidate. In 1921, President Warren G. Harding appointed Taft to be chief justice, a position in which he served until a month before his death. Taft was born in Cincinnati
Cincinnati
in 1857. His father, Alphonso Taft, was a U.S. Attorney General and Secretary of War
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Carl W. Ackerman
Carl William Ackerman (January 16, 1890 in Richmond, Indiana[1] – October 9, 1970 in New York City)[2] was an American journalist, author and educational administrator, the first dean of the Columbia School of Journalism. In 1919, as a correspondent of the Public Ledger of Philadelphia, he published the first excerpts of an English translation of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, but changed the text so that it appeared to be a Bolshevist
Bolshevist
tract. In 1931, he was appointed as the director and first dean of the newly established School of Journalism at Columbia University
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Douglas Southall Freeman
Douglas Southall Freeman
Douglas Southall Freeman
(May 16, 1886 – June 13, 1953) was an American historian, biographer, newspaper editor, and author. He is best known for his multi-volume biographies of Robert E. Lee
Robert E. Lee
and George Washington, for which he was awarded two Pulitzer Prizes.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Writing career2.1 Lee's Dispatches 2.2 R. E. Lee: A Biography 2.3 Lee's Lieutenants: A Study in Command 2.4 Biography of George Washington3 Newspaper, radio, and teaching careers 4 Personal life 5 Death and legacy 6 Honors and awards 7 Bibliography 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Douglas Southall Freeman
Douglas Southall Freeman
was born May 16, 1886 in Lynchburg, Virginia, to Bettie Allen Hamner and Walker Burford Freeman, an insurance agent who had served four years in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia
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Henry F. Pringle
Henry Fowles Pringle (August 23, 1897 in New York City
New York City
– April 7, 1958 in Washington, D.C.) was an American biographer and journalist. He won the 1932 Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography
Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography
for his 1931 biography of Theodore Roosevelt. Pringle was born in New York City. He served in the army during World War I and graduated from Cornell University. He became a reporter for the New York Sun, New York Globe, and New York World. He won notice for his biographical articles, written in a muckraking style. This led to his first book, a 1927 campaign biography of New York Governor and presidential aspirant Al Smith. In 1931 he published Theodore Roosevelt, a Biography,[1] which attempted to debunk some of the former president's more colorful accounts of his own life while providing a detailed portrait of his political career and also his personality
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Sciences Po
Sciences Po
Sciences Po
(French pronunciation: ​[sjɑ̃s po]), or Paris Institute of Political Studies (French: Institut d'études politiques de Paris, French pronunciation: ​[ɛ̃s.ti.ty de.tyd pɔ.li.tik də pa.ʁi]), is a highly selective French university (legally a grande école). It was founded as a private institution by Émile Boutmy in 1872 to promote a new class of French politicians in the aftermath of the French defeat in the Franco-Prussian war of 1871 [1] and grew to become a highly influential academic institution in the social sciences in France. Alumni include many notable public figures, including seven of the last eight French presidents, 12 foreign heads of state or government, heads of international organizations (including the UN, WTO, IMF and ECB), and six of the CAC 40
CAC 40
CEOs
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4,638-square-mile) Île-de-
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Johannesburg
Johannesburg
Johannesburg
(/dʒoʊˈhænɪsbɜːrɡ/; Afrikaans: [jʊəˈɦanəsbœrχ]; also known as Jozi, Joburg and Egoli) is the largest city in South Africa
South Africa
and is one of the 50 largest urban areas in the world.[8] It is the provincial capital and largest city in Gauteng, which is the wealthiest province in South Africa.[9] While Johannesburg
Johannesburg
is not one of South Africa's three capital cities, it is the seat of the Constitutional Court. The city is located in the mineral-rich Witwatersrand
Witwatersrand
range of hills and is the centre of large-scale gold and diamond trade.[citation needed] The metropolis is an alpha global city as listed by the Globalization and World Cities Research Network
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Nicholas Murray Butler
Nicholas Murray Butler
Nicholas Murray Butler
(April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was an American philosopher, diplomat, and educator. Butler was president of Columbia University,[1] president of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He became so well known and respected that The New York Times
The New York Times
printed his Christmas greeting to the nation every year.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Presidency of Columbia University 3 Political activity 4 Internationalist 5 Personal life 6 Honours 7 Works 8 See also 9 Notes 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Butler was born in Elizabeth, New Jersey
Elizabeth, New Jersey
to Mary Butler and manufacturing worker Henry Butler. He enrolled in Columbia College (later Columbia University) and joined the Peithologian Society
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John B. Oakes
John Bertram Oakes
John Bertram Oakes
(April 23, 1913 – April 5, 2001) was an iconoclastic and influential U.S. journalist known for his early commitment to the environment, civil rights, and opposition to the Vietnam War. He was born in Elkins Park, Pennsylvania, the second son of George Washington Ochs Oakes and Bertie Gans. The creator of the modern op-ed page and editor of the New York Times
New York Times
editorial page from 1961 to 1976, his was an idealistic and progressive American voice. His uncle was Adolph Ochs, the publisher of the New York Times. Oakes attended Princeton University
Princeton University
(A.B., 1934), where he was valedictorian of his class and graduated magna cum laude
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Association For Education In Journalism And Mass Communication
The Association for Education in Journalism
Journalism
and Mass Communication (AEJMC) is a major international membership organization for academics in the field, offering regional and national conferences and refereed publications. It has numerous membership divisions, interest groups, publications and websites.Contents1 Focus 2 Publications 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksFocus[edit] In the United States, many university journalism departments—particularly at Midwestern, Western and Southern state universities—evolved into schools or colleges of mass communication or "journalism and mass communication". In addition to studying practical skills of journalism, public relations or advertising, students also may major in "mass communication" or "mass communication research"
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Daniel Alarcón
Daniel Alarcón
Daniel Alarcón
(born 1977 in Lima, Peru) is a Peruvian-American author. He has been a distinguished visiting writer at Mills College and a visiting writer at California College of the Arts. In spring 2013, he was an investigative reporting fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. Currently, he is an assistant professor of broadcast journalism at Columbia University, his undergraduate alma mater.[1] His work has been published in The New Yorker, Harper's, Granta, Virginia Quarterly Review
Virginia Quarterly Review
and elsewhere, and anthologized in Best American Non-Required Reading 2004 and 2005. He is Associate Editor of the Peruvian magazine Etiqueta Negra, and he edited a portfolio for the magazine A Public Space
A Public Space
on the writing of Peru
Peru
in 2007
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Jelani Cobb
William Jelani Cobb (born August 21, 1969)[1] is an American writer,[2] author and educator. The Ira A. Lipman Professor of Journalism at Columbia University, Cobb was previously an associate professor of history and director of the Institute for African American Studies at the University of Connecticut
University of Connecticut
in Storrs, Connecticut from 2012 to 2016.[3] Since 2015, he has been a staff writer at The New Yorker.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Publications 4 Bibliography4.1 Books 4.2 Essays and reporting5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] William Jelani Cobb was born in Queens, New York, on August 21, 1969,[1] the youngest of four children. Both of Cobb's parents had migrated from the South, where they did not have access to high-quality schools. As a result, they were determined to give reading and learning important places in their family life
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Henry R. Luce
Henry Robinson Luce (April 3, 1898 – February 28, 1967) was an American magazine magnate who was called "the most influential private citizen in the America of his day".[1] He launched and closely supervised a stable of magazines that transformed journalism and the reading habits of upscale Americans. Time summarized and interpreted the week's news; Life was a picture magazine of politics, culture, and society that dominated American visual perceptions in the era before television; Fortune explored the economy in depth and the world business; and Sports Illustrated
Sports Illustrated
explored the motivations and strategies of sports teams and key players
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