HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Collateral Damage
Collateral damage is a general term for deaths, injuries, or other damage inflicted on an unintended target. In American military terminology, it is used for the incidental killing or wounding of non-combatants or damage to non-combatant property during an attack on a legitimate military target.[1][2] In US military terminology, the unintentional destruction of allied or neutral targets is called friendly fire. Critics of the term see it as a euphemism that dehumanizes non-combatants killed or injured during combat, used to reduce the perception of culpability of military leadership in failing to prevent non-combatant casualties.[3][4][5][6]Contents1 Etymology 2 Non-military uses of the phrase 3 Controversy 4 International humanitarian law 5 U.S
[...More...]

Proportionality (international Humanitarian Law)
Proportionality is a general principle in law which covers several special (although related) concepts. The concept of proportionality is used as a criterion of fairness and justice in statutory interpretation processes, especially in constitutional law, as a logical method intended to assist in discerning the correct balance between the restriction imposed by a corrective measure and the severity of the nature of the prohibited act. Within criminal law, it is used to convey the idea that the punishment of an offender should fit the crime
[...More...]

picture info

1991 Gulf War
Coalition victoryIraqi forces expelled from Kuwait Kuwaiti monarchy restored Destruction of Iraqi and Kuwaiti infrastructure Failed Shia/Kurdish uprisings against the Iraqi government Saddam Hussein
Saddam Hussein
regime of the Iraqi Baathist government retains power in Iraq UN sanctions against Iraq United Nations Security Council Resolution 687
[...More...]

Military Personnel
Military personnel are members of the state's armed forces. Their roles, pay, and obligations differ according to their military branch (army, navy, marines, air force, and sometimes coast guard), rank (officer, non-commissioned officer, or enlisted recruit), and their military task when deployed on operations and on exercise.Contents1 Overview 2 Demographics 3 Recruitment 4 Initial training 5 Terms of service5.1 Minimum service period 5.2 Military law 5.3 Posting and deployment 5.4 Perks6 Appearance 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit] Those who serve in a typical large land force are soldiers, making up an army. Those who serve in seagoing forces are seamen or sailors, and their branch is a navy or coast guard. Marines
Marines
serve in a marine corps
[...More...]

picture info

Civilian
A civilian is "a person who is not a member of the military or of a police or firefighting force".[1] The term "civilian" is slightly different from a non-combatant under the law of war, as some non-combatants are not civilians (for example, military chaplains attached to the belligerent armed forces or neutral military personnel). Under international law, civilians in the territories of a party to an armed conflict are entitled to certain privileges under the customary laws of war and international treaties such as the Fourth Geneva Convention
[...More...]

picture info

Strategic Bombing During World War II
Britain:60,000 civilians killed[2] 160,000 airmen (Europe)[3][4]China:260,000–351,000 Chinese civilians[5][6]France:67,000 civilians killed[7]The Netherlands:Thousands of civiliansPoland:Tens of thousands of civiliansUSSR:About 500,000 Soviet civilians[8] 2,700 airmen (Japan)[9]Germany:353,000–635,000 civilians killed, including foreign workers[2][10] Very heavy damage to industryJapan:330,000–500,000 civilians killed[11] Very heavy damage to industryItaly:60,000–100,000 civilians killed[12] 5,000 soldiers killed[12] Heavy damage to industryv t eCampaigns of World War IIEuropePoland Phoney War Winter War Denmark & Norway France & Benelux Britain Balkans Eastern Front Finland Western Front (1944–45)Pacific WarChina Pacific Ocean South-East Asia South West Pacific Japan Manchuria (1945)Mediterra
[...More...]

picture info

Bombing Of Chongqing
Begun in 1931–37Mukden ManchuriaJiangqiao Nenjiang Bridge Jinzhou HarbinShanghai (1932) Pacification of Manchukuo Rehe Great Wall Inner MongoliaSuiyuanBegun in 1937–39Marco Polo Bridge Beiping–Tianjin Chahar Shanghai (1937)Sihang WarehouseBeiping–Hankou Railway Tianjin–Pukou Railway TaiyuanPingxingguan XinkouNanjing XuzhouTaierzhuangN.-E. HenanLanfengAmoy Chongqing WuhanWanjialingCantonHainanNanchang Suixian–ZaoyangSwatow1st Changsha S. GuangxiKunlun PassWinter OffensiveWest Suiyuan WuyuanBegun in 1940–42Zaoyang–Yichang Hundred Regiments N. Vietnam C. Hubei S.Henan W. Hebei Shanggao S.Shanxi 2nd Changsha 3rd Changsha Yunnan-Burma RoadTachiao Oktwin Toungoo YenangyaungZhejiang–Jiangxi Sichuan invasionBegun in 1943–45W.Hubei N.Burma-W.Yunnan Changde Ichi-GoC.Henan 4th Changsha Hengyang Guilin–LiuzhouMt. Song W. Henan–N
[...More...]

picture info

Allies Of World War II
The Allies of World War II, called the United Nations
United Nations
from the 1 January 1942 declaration, were the countries that together opposed the Axis powers
Axis powers
during the Second World War (1939–1945). The Allies promoted the alliance as a means to control German, Japanese and Italian aggression. At the start of the war on 1 September 1939, the Allies consisted of France, Poland
Poland
and the United Kingdom, as well as their dependent states, such as British India. Within days they were joined by the independent Dominions of the British Commonwealth: Australia, Canada, New Zealand and South Africa.[1] After the start of the German invasion of North Europe until the Balkan Campaign, the Netherlands, Belgium, Greece, and Yugoslavia joined the Allies
[...More...]

picture info

Firestorm
A firestorm is a conflagration which attains such intensity that it creates and sustains its own wind system. It is most commonly a natural phenomenon, created during some of the largest bushfires and wildfires. Although the word has been used to describe certain large fires,[1] the phenomenon's determining characteristic is a fire with its own storm-force winds from every point of the compass.[2][3] The Black Saturday bushfires
Black Saturday bushfires
and the Great Peshtigo Fire
Peshtigo Fire
are possible examples of forest fires with some portion of combustion due to a firestorm, as is the Great Hinckley Fire
[...More...]

picture info

Bombing Of Hamburg In World War II
The Allied bombing of Hamburg
Hamburg
during World War II included numerous attacks on civilians and civic infrastructure
[...More...]

picture info

Bombing Of Tokyo
The Bombing of Tokyo
Tokyo
(東京大空襲, Tōkyōdaikūshū) often refers to a series of firebombing air raids by the United States
United States
Army Air Forces during the Pacific campaigns of World War II. On the night of 9–10 March 1945, Operation Meetinghouse
Operation Meetinghouse
was conducted and is regarded as the single most destructive bombing raid in human history.[1] 16 square miles (41 km2) of central Tokyo
Tokyo
were annihilated, over 1 million were made homeless with an estimated 100,000 civilian deaths. The US first mounted a seaborne, small-scale air raid on Tokyo
Tokyo
in April 1942
[...More...]

picture info

V-weapons
V-weapons, known in original German as Vergeltungswaffen (German pronunciation: [fɐˈgɛltʊŋsˌvafṇ], German: "retaliatory weapons", "reprisal weapons"), were a particular set of long-range artillery weapons designed for strategic bombing during World War II, particularly terror bombing and/or aerial bombing of cities.[1][2] They comprised the V-1, a pulsejet-powered cruise missile, the V-2, a liquid-fuelled ballistic missile (often referred to as V1 and V2), and the V-3 cannon. All of these weapons were intended for use in a military campaign against Britain, though only the V-1 and V-2
V-2
were so used in a campaign conducted 1944–5. After the invasion of Europe by the Allies, these weapons were also employed against targets on the mainland of Europe, mainly France and Belgium. The V-terrorbombing killed approximately 18,000 people, mostly civilians
[...More...]

picture info

Coalition Of The Gulf War
Below is the American-led coalition against the Iraqi government in the 1990s.Contents1 Coalition by number of military personnel 2 Coalition by Divisions2.1 Army
Army
Central Command 2.2 Marine Central Command 2.3 Joint Forces Command East 2.4 Joint Forces Command North3 Commanders of Coalition3.1 Bangladesh 3.2 Czechoslovakia 3.3 Egypt 3.4 France 3.5 Italy 3.6 Saudi Arabia 3.7 Syria 3.8 United Kingdom 3.9 United States4 Coalition by Equipment4.1 United States4.1.1 Tanks 4.1.2 Armored Vehicles 4.1.3 Self-Propelled Artillery/Mortars/Rockets
[...More...]

Military Terminology
Military
Military
terminology refers to the terms and language of military organizations and personnel as belonging to a discrete category, as distinguishable by their usage in military doctrine, as they serve to depoliticise, dehumanise, or otherwise abstract discussion about its operations from an actual description thereof.Contents1 Common understanding 2 Criticism 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksCommon understanding[edit] The operational pressure for uniform understanding has developed since the early 20th century with the importance of joint operations between different services (army, navy, air force) of the same country. International alliances and operations, including peacekeeping,[1] have added additional complexity. For example, the NATO
NATO
alliance now maintains a large dictionary[2] of common terms for use by member countries
[...More...]

picture info

Linguist
Linguistics
Linguistics
is the scientific[1] study of language,[2] and involves an analysis of language form, language meaning, and language in context.[3] The earliest activities in the documentation and description of language have been attributed to the 4th century BC Indian grammarian Pāṇini,[4][5] who wrote a formal description of the Sanskrit
Sanskrit
language in his Aṣṭādhyāyī.[6] Linguists traditionally analyse human language by observing an interplay between sound and meaning.[7] Phonetics is the study of speech and non-speech sounds, and delves into their acoustic and articulatory properties
[...More...]

Deborah Cameron (linguist)
Deborah Cameron (born 10 November 1958),[1] is a feminist linguist, who holds the Rupert Murdoch
Rupert Murdoch
Professorship in Language and Communication at Worcester College, Oxford University.[2] She is mainly interested in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology
[...More...]