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Clwydian Range
The Clwydian Range
Clwydian Range
(Welsh: Bryniau Clwyd) is a series of hills and mountains in north east Wales
Wales
that runs from Llandegla
Llandegla
in the south to Prestatyn
Prestatyn
in the north, with the highest point being the popular Moel Famau. The range is designated as an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty
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Abergele
Abergele
Abergele
is a community and small market town, situated on the north coast of Wales
Wales
between the holiday resorts of Colwyn Bay
Colwyn Bay
and Rhyl, in Conwy
Conwy
County Borough. Its northern suburb of Pensarn
Pensarn
lies on the Irish Sea coast and is known for its beach, where it is claimed by some that a ghost ship has been sighted. Abergele
Abergele
and Pensarn
Pensarn
railway station serves both resorts
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King Arthur
King Arthur
Arthur
is a legendary British leader who, according to medieval histories and romances, led the defence of Britain against Saxon invaders in the late 5th and early 6th centuries AD. The details of Arthur's story are mainly composed of folklore and literary invention, and his historical existence is debated and disputed by modern historians.[2] The sparse historical background of Arthur
Arthur
is gleaned from various sources, including the Annales Cambriae, the Historia Brittonum, and the writings of Gildas. Arthur's name also occurs in early poetic sources such as Y Gododdin.[3] Arthur
Arthur
is a central figure in the legends making up the Matter of Britain
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Manchester
Coordinates: 53°28′46″N 2°14′43″W / 53.47944°N 2.24528°W / 53.47944; -2.24528Manchester City
City
and Metropolitan boroughClockwise from top: Skyline of Manchester
Manchester

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Liverpool
Liverpool
Liverpool
(/ˈlɪvərpuːl/) is a city in North West England, with an estimated population of 484,578 in 2016 within the City
City
of Liverpool borough.[5] With its surrounding areas, it is the fifth-largest metropolitan area in the UK, with over 2.24 million people in 2011.[6] The local authority is Liverpool
Liverpool
City
City
Council, the most populous local government district within the metropolitan county of Merseyside
Merseyside
and the largest within the Liverpool
Liverpool
City
City
Region. Liverpool
Liverpool
is located on the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary, and historically lay within the ancient hundred of West Derby
West Derby
in the south west of the county of Lancashire.[7][8] It became a borough in 1207 and a city in 1880
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Chirk
Y Waun may also refer to Gwauncaegurwen in Glamorgan Chirk
Chirk
(Welsh: Y Waun, meaning The Moor[1]) is a small town and local government community in Wales. It is located in the traditional county of Denbighshire, although is currently administered as part of Wrexham County Borough. In the 2011 census, it had a population of 4,468.[2] It is located 10 miles south of Wrexham. It is situated between Wrexham
Wrexham
and Oswestry
Oswestry
and has been part of the County Borough since local government reorganisation in 1996
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Llandegla Forest
Llandegla Forest (Welsh: Coed Llandegla) is a forest of planted conifers covering 6.5 square kilometres in Denbighshire, north-east Wales. It is situated to the south-east of the village of Llandegla at the north-western edge of Ruabon Moors. The forest is owned by UPM Tilhill and planting began in the early 1970s. The trees are mostly Sitka Spruce with a smaller area of larch. In the middle of the forest lies Pendinas Reservoir (Welsh: Llyn Pendinas). It was constructed in the late nineteenth century by Brymbo Water Company to provide water for the local area. It is currently managed by Dee Valley Water. The forest is used for a range of recreational activities including mountain-biking and walking. The Offa's Dyke Path, a long-distance footpath passes through the forest. Fishing activity takes place at the reservoir. The forest and adjacent moorland are important habitats for the Black Grouse which is declining in many parts of England and Wales
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Mountain Bike
A mountain bike or mountain bicycle (abbreviated Mtn Bike or MTB[1]) is a bicycle designed for off-road cycling. Mountain bikes share similarities with other bikes, but incorporate features designed to enhance durability and performance in rough terrain. These typically include a front or full suspension, large knobby tires, more durable wheels, more powerful brakes, lower gear ratios for climbing steep grades, and higher gear ratios for going down steep grades.[citation needed] Mountain bikes are typically ridden on mountain trails, singletrack, fire roads, and other unpaved surfaces. This type of terrain commonly has rocks, roots, loose dirt, and steep grades. Many trails have additional TTF's (Technical Trail Features) such as log piles, log rides, rock gardens, skinnies, gap jumps, and wall-rides. Mountain bikes are built to handle these types of terrain and features
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Iron Age
Iron
Iron
Age metallurgy Ancient iron production↓ Ancient historyMediterranean, Greater Persia, South Asia, ChinaHistoriographyGreek, Roman, Chinese, MedievalThe Iron
Iron
Age is the final epoch of the three-age system, preceded by the Stone Age
Stone Age
(Neolithic) and the Bronze
Bronze
Age. It is an archaeological era in the prehistory and protohistory of Europe
Europe
and the Ancient Near East, and by analogy also used of other parts of the Old World
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Hillfort
A hillfort is a type of earthworks used as a fortified refuge or defended settlement, located to exploit a rise in elevation for defensive advantage. They are typically European and of the Bronze and Iron Ages. Some were used in the post-Roman period. The fortification usually follows the contours of a hill, consisting of one or more lines of earthworks, with stockades or defensive walls, and external ditches
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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Tumuli
A tumulus (plural tumuli) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus. Tumuli are often categorised according to their external apparent shape. In this respect, a long barrow is a long tumulus, usually constructed on top of several burials, such as passage graves. A round barrow is a round tumulus, also commonly constructed on top of burials. The internal structure and architecture of both long and round barrows has a broad range, the categorization only refers to the external apparent shape. The method of inhumation may involve a dolmen, a cist, a mortuary enclosure, a mortuary house, or a chamber tomb
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Snowdonia
Snowdonia (Welsh: Eryri) is a mountainous region in northwestern Wales and a national park of 823 square miles (2,130 km2) in area. It was the first to be designated of the three national parks in Wales, in 1951.Contents1 Name and extent 2 Snowdonia National Park 3 Tourism 4 Mountain ranges 5 Mountain walking 6 Nature, landscape and the environment6.1 Wildlife 6.2 Climate7 References 8 External linksName and extent[edit] The English name for the area derives from Snowdon, which is the highest mountain in Wales at 3560 ft (1,085 m). In Welsh, the area is named Eryri
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Cairn
A cairn is a human-made pile (or stack) of stones. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn [ˈkʰaːrˠn̪ˠ] (plural càirn [ˈkʰaːrˠɲ]).[1] Cairns
Cairns
have been and are used for a broad variety of purposes, from prehistoric times to the present.A cairn to mark a mountain summit in Graubünden, SwitzerlandIn modern times, cairns are often erected as landmarks, a use they have had since ancient times. However, since prehistory, they have also been built and used as burial monuments; for defense and hunting; for ceremonial purposes, sometimes relating to astronomy; to locate buried items, such as caches of food or objects; and to mark trails, among other purposes. Cairns
Cairns
are used as trail markers in many parts of the world, in uplands, on moorland, on mountaintops, near waterways and on sea cliffs, as well as in barren deserts and tundra
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Corwen
Corwen is a Town, community and electoral ward in the county of Denbighshire in Wales; it was previously part of the county of Merioneth. Corwen stands on the banks of the River Dee beneath the Berwyn mountains. The town is situated 10 miles (16 km) west of Llangollen and 13 miles (21 km) south of Ruthin. At the 2001 Census, Corwen had a population of 2,398,[1] reducing to 2,325 at the 2011 census.[2]Contents1 History 2 Economy 3 Transport 4 Culture 5 Geography 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]Corwen, circa 1875Corwen is best known for its connections with Owain Glyndŵr, who proclaimed himself Prince of Wales on 16 September 1400, from his nearby manor of Glyndyfrdwy, which began his fourteen-year rebellion against English rule.[3] A life-size bronze statue of the prince mounted on his battle horse was installed in The Square in 2007
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Pontcysyllte Aqueduct
The Pontcysyllte Aqueduct
Pontcysyllte Aqueduct
(Welsh pronunciation: [ˌpɔntkəˈsəɬtɛ], full name in Welsh: Traphont Ddŵr Pontcysyllte) is a navigable aqueduct that carries the Llangollen Canal
Llangollen Canal
across the River Dee in north east Wales. The 18-arched stone and cast iron structure, which took ten years to design and build, was completed in 1805. It is now the oldest and longest navigable aqueduct on Great Britain
Great Britain
and the highest in the world. The aqueduct was to be a key part of the central section of the proposed Ellesmere Canal, an industrial waterway that would create a commercial link between the River Severn
River Severn
at Shrewsbury
Shrewsbury
and the Port of Liverpool on the River Mersey
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