HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Clostridium
Clostridium
Clostridium
absonum, Clostridium
Clostridium
aceticum, Clostridium
[...More...]

"Clostridium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scanning Electron Microscope
A scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a type of electron microscope that produces images of a sample by scanning the surface with a focused beam of electrons. The electrons interact with atoms in the sample, producing various signals that contain information about the sample's surface topography and composition. The electron beam is scanned in a raster scan pattern, and the beam's position is combined with the detected signal to produce an image. SEM can achieve resolution better than 1 nanometer. Specimens can be observed in high vacuum in conventional SEM, or in low vacuum or wet conditions in variable pressure or environmental SEM, and at a wide range of cryogenic or elevated temperatures with specialized instruments.[1] The most common SEM mode is detection of secondary electrons emitted by atoms excited by the electron beam. The number of secondary electrons that can be detected depends, among other things, on specimen topography
[...More...]

"Scanning Electron Microscope" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bacteria
Acidobacteria Actinobacteria Aquificae Armatimonadetes Bacteroidetes Caldiserica Chlamydiae Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Elusimicrobia Fibrobacteres Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Synergistetes Tenericutes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermotogae VerrucomicrobiaSynonymsEubacteria Woese & Fox, 1977[2] Bacteria
Bacteria
(/bækˈtɪəriə/ ( listen); common noun bacteria, singular bacterium) constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Bacteria were among the first life forms to appear on Earth, and are present in most of its habitats
[...More...]

"Bacteria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridiaceae
Acetanaerobacterium Acetivibrio Acidaminobacter Alkaliphilus Anaerobacter Anaerostipes Anaerotruncus Anoxynatronum Bryantella Butyricicoccus Caldanaerocella Caldisalinibacter[1] Caloramator Caloranaerobacter Caminicella Candidatus Arthromitus Clostridium Cellulosibacter[2][3] Coprobacillus Crassaminicella[4] Dorea Ethanologenbacterium Faecalibacterium Garciella Guggenheimella Hespellia Linmingia Natronincola Oxobacter Parasporobacterium Sarcina Soehngenia Sporobacter Subdoligranulum Tepidibacter Tepidimicrobium Thermobrachium Thermohalobacter TindalliaThe Clostridiaceae are a family of the Clostridia, and contains the Clostridium genus. The family Clostridiaceae (scientific name) defined by the taxonomic outline of Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology contains as its core the genus Clostridium (sensu stricto), as well as Acetivibrio, Acidaminobacter, Alkaliphilus, Anaerobacter, Caloramator, Caloranaerobacter, Coprobacillus, Dorea, Natronincola, Oxobacter, Sarcina, Sporobac
[...More...]

"Clostridiaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Firmicutes
The Firmicutes
Firmicutes
(/fɜːrˈmɪkjʊtiːz/;[3] Latin: firmus, strong, and cutis, skin, referring to the cell wall) are a phylum of bacteria, most of which have Gram-positive cell wall structure.[4] A few, however, such as Megasphaera, Pectinatus, Selenomonas
Selenomonas
and Zymophilus, have a porous pseudo-outer membrane that causes them to stain Gram-negative. Scientists once classified the Firmicutes
Firmicutes
to include all Gram-positive bacteria, but have recently defined them to be of a core group of related forms called the low-G+C group, in contrast to the Actinobacteria. They have round cells, called cocci (singular coccus), or rod-like forms (bacillus). Many Firmicutes
Firmicutes
produce endospores, which are resistant to desiccation and can survive extreme conditions. They are found in various environments, and the group includes some notable pathogens
[...More...]

"Firmicutes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Cellobioparum
Clostridium cellobioparum is a species of anaerobic cellulose-degrading Gram-positive bacterium found in the bovine rumen belonging to the family Clostridiaceae.[1][2] References[edit]^ a b Hungate, R. E. (November 1944). "Studies on Cellulose Fermentation". Journal of Bacteriology. 48 (5): 499–513. ISSN 0021-9193. PMC 374000 . PMID 16560861.  ^ Chung, K. T. (1976-03-01). "Inhibitory effects of H2 on growth of Clostridium cellobioparum". Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 31 (3): 342–348. ISSN 0099-2240. Retrieved 2013-02-07. External links[edit]NCBI Taxonomy Browser Type strain of Clostridium cellobioparum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity MetadatabaseBiology portalTaxon identifiersWd: Q3681031 BacDive: 2567 EoL: 974981 GBIF: 3226568 ITIS: 960728This Clostridiales-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Clostridium Cellobioparum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Bifermentans
Clostridium bifermentans (CLOBI) is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. Toxins and mosquito larvae[edit] A certain subspecies, Clostridium bifermentans subsp. Malaysia, was the first anaerobic bacterium known to kill mosquito larvae. The subspecies was part of a collection at the Institute for Medical Research, Malaysia. A biochemical analysis found that the mosquitocidal cry toxin is coded by four genes in an operon: cry16Aa, cry17Aa, cbm17.1, and cbm17.2. When the four genes were individually expressed, none of the four proteins encoded exhibited mosquitocidal activity. This suggests that the toxicity requires four proteins cooperating as a complex to take effect. A single promoter was found upstream of the four genes, indicating that the four were likely to be expressed simultaneously. The half-life of toxicity was about one day and the toxin was unstable in high temperature. Although C. bifermentans subsp
[...More...]

"Clostridium Bifermentans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clostridia
The Clostridia
Clostridia
are a highly polyphyletic class of Firmicutes, including Clostridium
Clostridium
and other similar genera. They are distinguished from the Bacilli
Bacilli
by lacking aerobic respiration. They are obligate anaerobes and oxygen is toxic to them. Species of the class Clostridia are often but not always Gram-positive
Gram-positive
(see Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans) and have the ability to form spores.[1] Studies show they are not a monophyletic group, and their relationships are not entirely certain. Currently, most are placed in a single order called Clostridiales, but this is not a natural group and is likely to be redefined in the future. Most species of the genus Clostridium
Clostridium
are saprophytic organisms found in many places in the environment, most notably the soil. However, the genus does contain some human pathogens (outlined below)
[...More...]

"Clostridia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clostridiales
The Clostridia
Clostridia
are a highly polyphyletic class of Firmicutes, including Clostridium
Clostridium
and other similar genera. They are distinguished from the Bacilli
Bacilli
by lacking aerobic respiration. They are obligate anaerobes and oxygen is toxic to them. Species of the class Clostridia are often but not always Gram-positive
Gram-positive
(see Halanaerobium hydrogenoformans) and have the ability to form spores.[1] Studies show they are not a monophyletic group, and their relationships are not entirely certain. Currently, most are placed in a single order called Clostridiales, but this is not a natural group and is likely to be redefined in the future. Most species of the genus Clostridium
Clostridium
are saprophytic organisms found in many places in the environment, most notably the soil. However, the genus does contain some human pathogens (outlined below)
[...More...]

"Clostridiales" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Cellulolyticum
Clostridium cellulolyticum is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. References[edit]"Clostridium cellulolyticum: Petitdemange et al. 1984". National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI).  UniProt. "Clostridium cellulolyticum". Retrieved 2011-07-07. External links[edit]Type strain of Clostridium cellulolyticum at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity MetadatabaseBiology portalTaxon identifiersWd: Q3681034 BacDive: 2760 EoL: 995278 GBIF: 3226641 ITIS: 960642 NCBI: 1521This Clostridiales-related article is a stub
[...More...]

"Clostridium Cellulolyticum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Aerotolerans
Clostridium aerotolerans is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. Cl. aerotolerans is xylanolytic, which means that these bacteria can digest the polysaccharides collectively known as xylan. Among this species' products are formic acid, acetic acid, lactic acids, ethanol, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen. References[edit]van Gylswyk, N. O.; van der Toorn, J. J. T. K. (1987), "Clostridium aerotolerans sp. nov., a Xylanolytic Bacterium from Corn Stover and from the Rumina of Sheep Fed Corn Stover", International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology, 37 (2): 102–105, doi:10.1099/00207713-37-2-102  "Clostridium aerotolerans: van Gylswyk and van der Toorn, 1987". National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). External links[edit]Clostridium aerotolerans at the Encyclopedia of Life UniProt. "Clostridium aerotolerans"
[...More...]

"Clostridium Aerotolerans" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Aminophilum
Clostridium aminophilum is a species of gram-positive ammonia-producing ruminal bacteria, with type strain FT.[1] References[edit]^ Paster, B. J.; Russell, J. B.; Yang, C. M. J.; Chow, J. M.; Woese, C. R.; Tanner, R. (1993). "Phylogeny of the Ammonia-Producing Ruminal Bacteria Peptostreptococcus anaerobius, Clostridium sticklandii, and Clostridium aminophilum sp. nov". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. 43 (1): 107–110. doi:10.1099/00207713-43-1-107. ISSN 0020-7713. PMID 8427801. Further reading[edit]Houlihan AJ, Russell JB (2003). "The susceptibility of ionophore-resistant Clostridium aminophilum F to other antibiotics". J Antimicrob Chemother. 52 (4): 623–8. doi:10.1093/jac/dkg398. PMID 12951349.  Rychlik JL, Russell JB (2002). "The adaptation and resistance of Clostridium aminophilum F to the butyrivibriocin-like substance of Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens JL5 and monensin". FEMS Microbiol Lett. 209 (1): 93–8
[...More...]

"Clostridium Aminophilum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Autoethanogenum
Clostridium autoethanogenum is an anaerobic bacterium that produces ethanol from carbon monoxide, in so-called syngas fermentation, being one of the few known microorganisms to do so. It is gram-positive, spore-forming, rod-like, motile, and was first isolated from rabbit feces. Its type strain is strain JA1-1.[1] Its genome has been sequenced.[2] References[edit]^ Abrini, Jamal; Naveau, Henry; Nyns, Edmond-Jacques (1994). "Clostridium autoethanogenum, sp. nov., an anaerobic bacterium that produces ethanol from carbon monoxide". Archives of Microbiology. 161 (4): 345–351. doi:10.1007/BF00303591. ISSN 0302-8933.  ^ Bruno-Barcena, J. M.; Chinn, M. S.; Grunden, A. M. (2013). "Genome Sequence of the Autotrophic Acetogen Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 Strain DSM 10061, a Producer of Ethanol from Carbon Monoxide". Genome Announcements. 1 (4): e00628–13–e00628–13. doi:10.1128/genomeA.00628-13
[...More...]

"Clostridium Autoethanogenum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Baratii
Clostridium baratii is an anaerobic, motile, gram-positive bacterium. It is a rare cause of infant botulism, in which newborns or infants lose their muscle tone, and develop trouble feeding due to a difficulty in breathing, which can be fatal. Newborns can recover spontaneously or as in two known cases improve with injected botulism antitoxin. As of 2015[update], the environmental source of this bacterium is unknown, despite extensive investigations when cases have occurred. It is named after Barat who is a French bacteriologist.[1]Contents1 Diagnosis 2 Symptoms and signs of infection 3 Epidemiology 4 References 5 External linksDiagnosis[edit] The diagnosis must be suspected based on the constellation of symptoms. Clostridium baratii infection is proven when it is grown on a petri dish and isolated from a stool culture
[...More...]

"Clostridium Baratii" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Clostridium Chauvoei
Clostridium chauvoei is an anaerobic, motile, Gram-positive bacterium. In cattle and sheep, a severe infection causes blackleg. Clostridial diseases are considered soil-borne diseases and Clostridium chauvoei, specifically, is known to cause blackleg disease in humans and animals. As it is considered a soil-borne disease, scientists have found a correlation between flooding and the amount of bacteria found in the soil - the spores are redistributed to then contaminate soils, pastures, and water. A study conducted in Taiwan sought to test this correlation by using nucleic acid to extract Clostridium chauvoei from the soil before and after flooding
[...More...]

"Clostridium Chauvoei" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.