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Closet Auger
A plumber's snake is a slender, flexible auger used to dislodge clogs in plumbing. The plumber's snake is often reserved for difficult clogs that cannot be loosened with a plunger. It is also sometimes called a toilet jack.Contents1 Auger varieties1.1 Hand auger / hand spinner 1.2 Closet auger / toilet auger 1.3 Drum augers 1.4 Roto-Rooter2 See also 3 External linksAuger varieties[edit] Plumber's snakes have a coiled (helix-shaped) metal wire with a broader gap between the coils at the terminal end. The operator turns a crank to rotate the helix as it moves through the pipe. If the clog is caused by a dense, but shreddable obstacle, such as tree roots or glass wool, the auger might break it up enough to enable flow. A small, lightweight obstruction might be snagged or corkscrewed by the auger, enabling the operator to pull it away
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Sanitary Sewer
A sanitary sewer or "foul sewer" is an underground carriage system specifically for transporting sewage from houses and commercial buildings through pipes to treatment facilities or disposal. Sanitary sewers are part of an overall system called a sewage system or sewerage. Sewage
Sewage
may be treated to control water pollution before discharge to surface waters.[1][2] Sanitary sewers serving industrial areas also carry industrial wastewater. Separate sanitary sewer systems are designed to transport sewage alone. In municipalities served by sanitary sewers, separate storm drains may convey surface runoff directly to surface waters. Sanitary sewers are distinguished from combined sewers, which combine sewage with stormwater runoff in one pipe
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Hex Key
A hex key, Allen key or Allen wrench is a tool used to drive bolts and screws with hexagonal sockets in their heads. The Allen name is a registered trademark, originated by the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut
Hartford, Connecticut
circa 1910, and currently owned by Apex Tool
Tool
Group, LLC. Its genericised use is discouraged by this company
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Cat's Paw (nail Puller)
A cat's paw or cat's claw is a standard carpenter's tool, consisting of a round or hexagonal bar that curves at one end to form a pointed, cup-shaped tip with a V-shaped cleft for gripping nailheads. Popular retail outlets currently call these a claw bar if it has a claw on each end, or a moulding bar if it has a claw on one end and a flat pry bar on the other. It essentially works as a small crowbar. To use the tool the user holds the tool's shank with one hand and drives the claw around a nailhead with a hammer. When the V is firmly seated around the nail's shank, the users pull the bar back to raise the head, then finishes pulling the nail with the hammer's claw
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Caulking
Caulking
Caulking
is both the processes and material (also called sealant) to seal joints or seams in various structures and some types of piping. The oldest form of caulking is used to make the seams in wooden boats or ships watertight, by driving fibrous materials into the wedge-shaped seams between boards. A related process was formerly employed to join sections of cast iron sewerage pipe. Caulking
Caulking
is also the term to describe the process used to make riveted iron or steel ships and boilers watertight or steamtight. The same term also refers to the application of flexible sealing compounds to close up gaps in buildings and other structures against water, air, dust, insects, or as a component in firestopping
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Clamp (tool)
A clamp is a fastening device used to hold or secure objects tightly together to prevent movement or separation through the application of inward pressure. In the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and Australia, the term cramp is often used instead when the tool is for temporary use for positioning components during construction and woodworking; thus a G cramp or a sash cramp but a wheel clamp or a surgical clamp. There are many types of clamps available for many different purposes. Some are temporary, as used to position components while fixing them together, others are intended to be permanent
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Crowbar (tool)
A crowbar, also called a wrecking bar, pry bar or prybar, pinch-bar, or occasionally a prise bar or prisebar, colloquially, in Britain and Australia
Australia
sometimes called a jimmy (also called jimmy bar or jemmy),[1] gooseneck, or pig foot, is a tool consisting of a metal bar with a single curved end and flattened points, often with a small fissure on one or both ends for removing nails. It is also a class 1 lever. In Britain, Ireland, New Zealand, and Australia, due to the influence of American media "crowbar" may occasionally be used loosely for this tool, but it is still mainly used to mean a larger straighter tool, its original English meaning (see digging bar). The term jammy or jimmy most often refers to the tool when used for burglary.[citation needed] It is used as a lever either to force apart two objects or to remove nails. Crowbars are commonly used to open nailed wooden crates, remove nails, or pry apart boards
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Fish Tape
A fish tape (also known as a draw wire or draw tape) is a tool used by electricians to route new wiring through walls and electrical conduit.[1] Made of a narrow band of spring steel, by careful manipulation, the tape can be guided through confined spaces such as wall cavities. The goal is to push toward an area where guide string has been dropped inside the confined space and to pull it through, so the guide string can then be used to pull through various types of wiring, such as phone wire, network cables or speaker wire. Fish tape
Fish tape
is designed to pull through guide string only. Using it to directly pull the target wire can damage or warp the fish tape. Design[edit] Fish tapes are usually stored coiled on a plastic reel. Because of this, they have a natural curvature and it is this curvature that allows them to be guided. By manipulating the reel, the end of the tape can be directed slightly
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Gimlet (tool)
A gimlet is a hand tool for drilling small holes, mainly in wood, without splitting. It was defined in Joseph Gwilt's Architecture (1859) as "a piece of steel of a semi-cylindrical form, hollow on one side, having a cross handle at one end and a worm or screw at the other".[1] A gimlet is always a small tool. A similar tool of larger size is called an auger. The cutting action of the gimlet is slightly different from an auger, however, as the end of the screw, and so the initial hole it makes, is smaller; the cutting edges pare away the wood which is moved out by the spiral sides, falling out through the entry hole. This also pulls the gimlet farther into the hole as it is turned; unlike a bradawl, pressure is not required once the tip has been drawn in. The name "gimlet" comes from the Old French
Old French
guinbelet, guimbelet, later guibelet, probably a diminutive of the Anglo-French "wimble", a variation of "guimble", from the Middle Low German wiemel, cf
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Glass Breaker
A glass breaker is a small hand tool designed to aid in the emergency extrication of occupants from a vehicle. Most glass breakers contain a sharp pointed metal tip for breaking tempered glass and a sharp knife for slicing seatbelts.[1] [2] Glass breakers are also built into other tools, such as flashlights or multitools.[3] Unlike bus mallets, glass breakers are smaller and generally privately owned.References[edit]^ "At least 5 children have died so far this year from heatstroke inside vehicles". Hays Post. 2017-04-26. Retrieved 2017-05-24.  ^ "13 must-have car gadgets that cost less than $100". Business Insider. Retrieved 2017-05-24.  ^ "E.LUMEN solar LED flashlight is a great addition to your glovebox & emergency kit (Review)". TreeHugger. Retrieved 2017-05-24. This tool article is a stub
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Grease Gun (tool)
A grease gun is a common workshop and garage tool used for lubrication. The purpose of the grease gun is to apply lubricant through an aperture to a specific point, usually on a grease fitting or 'nipple'. The channels behind the grease nipple lead to where the lubrication is needed. The aperture may be of a type that fits closely with a receiving aperture on any number of mechanical devices. The close fitting of the apertures ensures that lubricant is applied only where needed
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Hammer
A hammer is a tool or device that delivers a blow (a sudden impact) to an object. Most hammers are hand tools used to drive nails, fit parts, forge metal, and break apart objects. Hammers vary in shape, size, and structure depending on their purposes. Hammers are basic tools in many trades. The usual features are a head (most often made of steel) and a handle (also called a helve or haft). Although most hammers are hand tools, powered versions exist; they are known as powered hammers. Types of power hammer include steam hammers and trip hammers, often for heavier uses, such as forging. Some specialized hammers have other names, such as sledgehammer, mallet, and gavel
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Hawk (plasterer's Tool)
A hawk is a tool used to hold a plaster, mortar, or a similar material, so that the user can repeatedly, quickly and easily get some of that material on the tool which then applies it to a surface. A hawk consists of a board about 25 cm (9 inches) square with a perpendicular handle fixed centrally on the reverse. The user holds the hawk horizontally with the non-dominant hand and applies the material on the hawk with a tool held in the dominant hand. Hawks are most often used by plasterers along with a finishing trowel to apply a smooth finish of plaster to a wall. Brick pointers use a hawk to hold mortar while they work
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Hole Punch
A hole punch (also known as a hole puncher) most commonly refers to an office tool that is used to create holes in sheets of paper, often for the purpose of collecting the sheets in a binder or folder
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Breaker Bar
A breaker bar is a long non-ratcheting bar that is used with socket wrench-style sockets. They are used to break loose very tight fasteners because their additional length allows the same amount of force to generate significantly more torque than a standard length socket wrench.[1]:1,3 Their use prevents damage to the ratcheting mechanism of a socket wrench. Often, after the first half turn, the fastener is loose enough to be turned with a socket wrench. Function[edit] The long handle on breaker bars compared to shorter wrenches allow a larger torque to be generated with the same amount of force. A breaker bar can be improvised by inserting a wrench into a length of metal pipe to increase the available torque. A pipe used for this purpose is called a cheater bar or snipe. References[edit]^ U.S
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Impact Driver
An impact driver is a tool that delivers a strong, sudden rotational and downward force, often used by mechanics to loosen larger screws (bolts) and nuts that are corrosively "frozen" or over-torqued.[1] The direction can also be reversed for situations where screws have to be tightened with torque greater than a screwdriver can reasonably provide. Manual impact drivers consist of a heavy outer sleeve that surrounds an inner core that is splined to it. The spline is curved so that when the user strikes the outer sleeve with a hammer, its downward force works on the spline to produce turning force on the core and any socket or work bit attached to it. The tool translates the heavy rotational inertia of the sleeve to the lighter core to generate large amounts of torque. At the same time, the striking blow from the hammer forces the impact driver down into the screw reducing or eliminating cam out. This attribute is beneficial for Phillips screws which are prone to cam out
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