HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Cloning
In biology, cloning is the process of producing similar populations of genetically identical individuals that occurs in nature when organisms such as bacteria, insects, plants or animals reproduce asexually. Cloning
Cloning
in biotechnology refers to processes used to create copies of DNA
DNA
fragments (molecular cloning), cells (cell cloning), or organisms (organism cloning). The term also refers to the production of multiple copies of a product such as digital media or software. The term clone, invented by J. B. S. Haldane, is derived from the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
word κλών klōn, "twig", referring to the process whereby a new plant can be created from a twig
[...More...]

"Cloning" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mutagen
In genetics, a mutagen is a physical or chemical agent that changes the genetic material, usually DNA, of an organism and thus increases the frequency of mutations above the natural background level. As many mutations can cause cancer, mutagens are therefore also likely to be carcinogens, although not always necessarily so. Some chemicals only become mutagenic through cellular processes
[...More...]

"Mutagen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Liquidambar Styraciflua
American sweetgum ( Liquidambar
Liquidambar
styraciflua), also known as American storax,[1] hazel pine,[2] bilsted,[3] redgum,[1] satin-walnut,[1] star-leaved gum,[3] alligatorwood,[1] or simply sweetgum,[1][4] is a deciduous tree in the genus Liquidambar
Liquidambar
native to warm temperate areas of eastern North America
North America
and tropical montane regions of Mexico
Mexico
and Central America. Sweet gum is one of the main valuable forest trees in the southeastern United States, and is a popular ornamental tree in temperate climates. It is recognizable by the combination of its five-pointed star-shaped leaves and its hard, spiked fruits
[...More...]

"Liquidambar Styraciflua" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fungi
Dikarya
Dikarya
(inc. Deuteromycota)AscomycotaPezizomycotina Saccharomycotina TaphrinomycotinaBasidiomycotaAgaricomycotina Pucciniomycotina UstilaginomycotinaSubphyla incertae sedisEntomophthoromycotina Kickxellomycotina Mucoromycotina ZoopagomycotinaA fungus (plural: fungi[3] or funguses[4]) is any member of the group of eukaryotic organisms that includes microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. These organisms are classified as a kingdom, Fungi, which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of plants and animals. A characteristic that places fungi in a different kingdom from plants, bacteria, and some protists is chitin in their cell walls. Similar to animals, fungi are heterotrophs; they acquire their food by absorbing dissolved molecules, typically by secreting digestive enzymes into their environment. Fungi do not photosynthesise
[...More...]

"Fungi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Clonal Colony
A clonal colony or genet is a group of genetically identical individuals, such as plants, fungi, or bacteria, that have grown in a given location, all originating vegetatively, not sexually, from a single ancestor. In plants, an individual in such a population is referred to as a ramet. In fungi, "individuals" typically refers to the visible fruiting bodies or mushrooms that develop from a common mycelium which, although spread over a large area, is otherwise hidden in the soil. Clonal colonies are common in many plant species. Although many plants reproduce sexually through the production of seed, reproduction occurs by underground stolons or rhizomes in some plants. Above ground, these plants appear to be distinct individuals, but underground they remain interconnected and are all clones of the same plant
[...More...]

"Clonal Colony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Vaccinium Corymbosum
Vaccinium corymbosum, the northern highbush blueberry, is a North American species of blueberry which has become a food crop of significant economic importance. It is native to eastern Canada and the eastern and southern United States, from Ontario east to Nova Scotia and south as far as Florida and eastern Texas. It is also naturalized in other places: Europe, Japan, New Zealand, the Pacific Northwest of North America, etc.[2][3][4][5] Other common names include blue huckleberry, tall huckleberry, swamp huckleberry, high blueberry, and swamp blueberry.[6]Contents1 Description 2 History 3 Uses3.1 Cultivation3.1.1 Cultivars 3.1.2 Southern highbush blueberry4 Gallery 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksDescription[edit] Vaccinium corymbosum is a deciduous shrub growing to 6–12 feet (1.8–3.7 m) tall and wide. It is often found in dense thickets. The dark glossy green leaves are elliptical and up to 5 centimetres (2.0 in) long
[...More...]

"Vaccinium Corymbosum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hazel
Lopima DochnahlYoung male catkins of Corylus avellanaThe hazel (Corylus) is a genus of deciduous trees and large shrubs native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere. The genus is usually placed in the birch family Betulaceae,[2][3][4][5] though some botanists split the hazels (with the hornbeams and allied genera) into a separate family Corylaceae.[6][7] The fruit of the hazel is the hazelnut. Hazels have simple, rounded leaves with double-serrate margins. The flowers are produced very early in spring before the leaves, and are monoecious, with single-sex catkins, the male catkins are pale yellow and 5–12 cm long, and the female ones are very small and largely concealed in the buds, with only the bright-red, 1-to-3 mm-long styles visible
[...More...]

"Hazel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pando (tree)
Pando (Latin for "spread out"), also known as the Trembling Giant,[1][2] is a clonal colony of a single male quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) determined to be a single living organism by identical genetic markers[3] and assumed to have one massive underground root system. The plant occupies 43 hectares (106 acres) and is estimated to weigh collectively 6,000,000 kilograms (6,600 short tons),[4] making it the heaviest known organism.[5][6] The root system of Pando, at an estimated 80,000 years old, is among the oldest known living organisms.[7][8] Pando is located 1 mile (1.6 km) southwest of Fish Lake on Utah State Route 25,[9] in the Fremont River Ranger District of the Fishlake National Forest, at the western edge of the Colorado Plateau in south-central Utah, United States. Pando is currently thought to be dying
[...More...]

"Pando (tree)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Myrica
About 35 species, including: Myrica adenophora Myrica arborea Myrica californica Myrica caroliniensis Myrica cerifera Myrica esculenta Myrica faya Myrica gale Myrica hartwegii Myrica holdrigeana Myrica inodora Myrica integra Myrica nana Myrica parvifolia Myrica pensylvanica Myrica pilulifera Myrica pubescens Myrica rivas-martinezii Myrica rubra Myrica serrataMyrica /mɪˈraɪkə/[2] is a genus of about 35–50 species of small trees and shrubs in the family Myricaceae, order Fagales. The genus has a wide distribution, including Africa, Asia, Europe, North America and South America, and missing only from Australia. Some botanists split the genus into two genera on the basis of the catkin and fruit structure, restricting Myrica to a few species, and treating the others in Morella.[3] Common names include bayberry, bay-rum tree, candleberry, sweet gale, and wax-myrtle
[...More...]

"Myrica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Promoter (biology)
In genetics, a promoter is a region of DNA
DNA
that initiates transcription of a particular gene. Promoters are located near the transcription start sites of genes, on the same strand and upstream on the DNA
DNA
(towards the 5'
5'
region of the sense strand)
[...More...]

"Promoter (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
[...More...]

"Ancient Greek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chromosome
A chromosome (from ancient Greek: χρωμόσωμα, chromosoma, chroma means colour, soma means body) is a DNA
DNA
molecule with part or all of the genetic material (genome) of an organism. Most eukaryotic chromosomes include packaging proteins which, aided by chaperone proteins, bind to and condense the DNA
DNA
molecule to prevent it from becoming an unmanageable tangle.[1][2] Chromosomes are normally visible under a light microscope only when the cell is undergoing the metaphase of cell division (where all chromosomes are aligned in the center of the cell in their condensed form).[3] Before this happens, every chromosome is copied once (S phase), and the copy is joined to the original by a centromere, resulting either in an X-shaped structure (pictured to the right) if the centromere is located in the middle of the chromosome or a two-arm structure if the centromere is located near one of the ends
[...More...]

"Chromosome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Origin Of Replication
The origin of replication (also called the replication origin) is a particular sequence in a genome at which replication is initiated.[1] This can either involve the replication of DNA in living organisms such as prokaryotes and eukaryotes, or that of DNA or RNA in viruses, such as double-stranded RNA viruses.[2] DNA replication
DNA replication
may proceed from this point bidirectionally or unidirectionally.[3] The specific structure of the origin of replication varies somewhat from species to species, but all share some common characteristics such as high AT content (repeats of adenine and thymine are easier to separate because their base stacking interactions are not as strong as those of guanine and cytosine[4])
[...More...]

"Origin Of Replication" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Affinity Tag
Protein tags are peptide sequences genetically grafted onto a recombinant protein. Often these tags are removable by chemical agents or by enzymatic means, such as proteolysis or intein splicing. Tags are attached to proteins for various purposes. Affinity tags are appended to proteins so that they can be purified from their crude biological source using an affinity technique. These include chitin binding protein (CBP), maltose binding protein (MBP), Strep-tag[1] and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). The poly(His) tag is a widely used protein tag, which binds to metal matrices. Solubilization tags are used, especially for recombinant proteins expressed in chaperone-deficient species such as E. coli, to assist in the proper folding in proteins and keep them from precipitating. These include thioredoxin (TRX) and poly(NANP)
[...More...]

"Affinity Tag" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Optical Injection
Optical transfection is the process of introducing nucleic acids into cells using light. Typically, a laser is focussed to a diffraction limited spot (~1 µm diameter) using a high numerical aperture microscope objective. The plasma membrane of a cell is then exposed to this highly focussed light for a small amount of time (typically tens of milliseconds to seconds), generating a transient pore on the membrane. The generation of a photopore allows exogenous plasmid DNA, RNA, organic fluorophores, or larger objects such as semiconductor quantum nanodots to enter the cell. In this technique, one cell at a time is treated, making it particularly useful for single cell analysis. To put the above simply, cells do not usually allow certain types of substances into their interior space
[...More...]

"Optical Injection" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Antibiotic
Antibiotics
Antibiotics
(from ancient Greek αντιβιοτικά, antibiotiká), also called antibacterials, are a type of antimicrobial[1] drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.[2][3] They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria
[...More...]

"Antibiotic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.