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Clifford Edmund Bosworth
Clifford
Clifford
may refer to: Clifford
Clifford
(name), an English given name and surname, includes a list of people with that namePlaces[edit]EnglandClifford, Devon, a location Clifford, Herefordshire
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Clifford
Clifford
Clifford
may refer to: Clifford
Clifford
(name), an English given name and surname, includes a list of people with that namePlaces[edit]EnglandClifford, Devon, a location Clifford, Herefordshire
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Clifford-Warren House
The Clifford–Warren House
Clifford–Warren House
is an historic First Period
First Period
house at 3 Clifford Road in Plymouth, Massachusetts. The 1-1/2 story gambrel-roofed Cape style house was built c. 1695. It is five bays wide, with a large central chimney
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Clifford International School
Clifford International School (CIS; Chinese: 广州番禺祈福英语实验学校) is an international school located in Guangzhou, People's Republic of China. The school follows the Canadian curriculum, or more precisely, the study programs of the province of Manitoba. The medium of instruction of CIS is English, however, students wishing to study an alternative foreign language can have the options of Mandarin Chinese
Mandarin Chinese
and French
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Clifford Module
In mathematics, a Clifford module is a representation of a Clifford algebra. In general a Clifford algebra C is a central simple algebra over some field extension L of the field K over which the quadratic form Q defining C is defined. The abstract theory of Clifford modules was founded by a paper of M. F. Atiyah, R. Bott
R. Bott
and Arnold S. Shapiro. A fundamental result on Clifford modules is that the Morita equivalence class of a Clifford algebra (the equivalence class of the category of Clifford modules over it) depends only on the signature p − q (mod 8)
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Clifford Pier
Clifford Pier
Pier
is a former pier located beside Collyer Quay
Collyer Quay
at Marina Bay within the Downtown Core
Downtown Core
of the Central Area, Singapore. It had since renovated and currently serves as a restaurant under the same namesake "The Clifford Pier", offering a selection of local, Asian and Western dishes under the operations of The Fullerton Bay Hotel since then.[2]Contents1 History1.1 Launch 1.2 Architecture2 Marina South
Marina South
Pier 3 Redevelopment 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: Johnston's Pier Before the Tanjong Pagar
Tanjong Pagar
wharves were built in the 1850s, Johnston's Pier
Pier
was the chief landing place
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Clifford Theory
In mathematics, Clifford theory, introduced by Alfred H. Clifford (1937), describes the relation between representations of a group and those of a normal subgroup.Contents1 Alfred H. Clifford1.1 Clifford's theorem2 Proof of Clifford's theorem 3 Corollary of Clifford's theorem 4 Further developments 5 ReferencesAlfred H. Clifford[edit] Alfred H. Clifford proved the following result on the restriction of finite-dimensional irreducible representations from a group G to a normal subgroup N of finite index: Clifford's theorem[edit] Theorem. Let π: G → GL(n,K) be an irreducible representation with K a field. Then the restriction of π to N breaks up into a direct sum of irreducible representations of N of equal dimensions. These irreducible representations of N lie in one orbit for the action of G by conjugation on the equivalence classes of irreducible representations of N
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Clifford Torus
In geometric topology, the Clifford torus is the simplest and most symmetric Euclidean space embedding of the cartesian product of two circles S1a and S1b. It resides in R4, as opposed to in R3. To see why R4 is necessary, note that if S1a and S1b each exist in their own independent embedding spaces R2a and R2b, the resulting product space will be R4 rather than R3. The historically popular view that the cartesian product of two circles is an R3 torus in contrast requires the highly asymmetric application of a rotation operator to the second circle, since that circle will only have one independent axis z available to it after the first circle consumes x and y. Stated another way, a torus embedded in R3 is an asymmetric reduced-dimension projection of the maximally symmetric Clifford torus embedded in R4. The relationship is similar to that of projecting the edges of a cube onto a sheet of paper
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Clifford's Inn
Clifford's Inn
Clifford's Inn
is a former Inn of Chancery in London. It was located between Fetter Lane, Clifford's Inn
Clifford's Inn
Passage, leading off Fleet Street and Chancery Lane
Chancery Lane
in the City of London. The Inn was founded in 1344 and refounded 15 June 1668. It was dissolved in 1903, and most of its original structure was demolished in 1934. It was both the first Inn of Chancery to be founded and the last to be demolished. Through the ages, Clifford's Inn
Clifford's Inn
was engaged in educating students in jurisprudence, Edward Coke
Edward Coke
and John Selden
John Selden
being two of its best known alumni. It also accommodated graduates preparing for ordination, such as the novelist Samuel Butler[1] and those studying for other professions
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Clifford's Theorem (other)
Clifford's theorem may refer to: Clifford's theorem on special divisors Clifford theory in representation theory Hammersley–Clifford theorem
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Clifford's Tower
York
York
Castle
Castle
in the city of York, England, is a fortified complex comprising, over the last nine centuries, a sequence of castles, prisons, law courts and other buildings on the south side of the River Foss. The now-ruinous keep of the medieval Norman castle is commonly referred to as Clifford's Tower. Built originally on the orders of William I to dominate the former Viking
Viking
city of York, the castle suffered a tumultuous early history before developing into a major fortification with extensive water defences. After a major explosion in 1684 rendered the remaining military defences uninhabitable, York Castle
Castle
continued to be used as a jail and prison until 1929. The first motte and bailey castle on the site was built in 1068 following the Norman conquest of York
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Clifford Family (bankers)
The Clifford family
Clifford family
was a family of bankers, merchants and regenten of English descent who were active in Amsterdam
Amsterdam
during the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries. The family originated in northern England, although the surname originated in the village of Clifford, Herefordshire.[1] Northern England
England
was the home of the noble Clifford family, since Roger Clifford was born in Cumberland
Cumberland
and died in Brough Castle in Westmorland
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Clifford (horse)
Clifford (1890–1917)[1] is a deceased racehorse who was best known for being inducted into the National Museum of Racing and Hall of Fame in 2014.[2]Contents1 Background 2 Career2.1 2-year-old-season 2.2 3-year-old-season 2.3 4-year-old-season 2.4 5-year-old-season 2.5 6-year-old-season 2.6 7-year-old-season3 ReferencesBackground[edit] Clifford was a bay or brown horse who to many was perceived as ugly and weak. The New York Times
New York Times
said “As a yearling he was one of the poorest-looking animals of the lot in which he was offered for sale, and nothing great was expected of him," but as he turned into a legend the times said "one of the most brilliant performers the American turf has ever known," He was born in Nashville, Tennessee
Nashville, Tennessee
at Jackson’s Belle Meade Stud. He was owned by Clifford Porter who named the horse after his first name
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Baron Clifford
Baron Clifford
Baron Clifford
is a title in the Peerage of England created by writ of summons on 17 February 1628 for Henry Clifford (later 5th Earl of Cumberland). Henry, Lord Clifford inherited his father's title in 1641, whereupon he sat in the House of Lords
House of Lords
as Earl of Cumberland until his death in 1643. His daughter Lady Elizabeth Clifford succeeded to the title suo jure (although, as was customary in those days, she never made claim to it). Lady Elizabeth had married, in 1634, Hon Richard Boyle (later Viscount Boyle) who was also created in 1644 Baron Clifford
Baron Clifford
of Lanesborough in the Peerage of England with a seat in the House of Lords. The Clifford barony of 1628 creation remained with the Earls of Burlington and Cork until the death of the 3rd and last Earl of Burlington in 1753, when that earldom and the Clifford of Lanesborough barony (ie
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Baron Clifford Of Chudleigh
Baron Clifford
Baron Clifford
of Chudleigh, of Chudleigh
Chudleigh
in the County of Devon, is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1672 for Thomas Clifford
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Baron De Clifford
Baron de Clifford
Baron de Clifford
is a title in the Peerage of England. It was created in 1299 for Robert de Clifford (c.1274–1314),[1] feudal baron of Clifford[2] in Herefordshire, feudal baron of Skipton[3] in Yorkshire and feudal baron of Appleby[4] in Westmoreland. The title was created by writ, which means that it can descend through both male and female lines. The Norman family which later took the name de Clifford settled in England
England
after the Norman Conquest
Norman Conquest
of 1066 and was first seated in England
England
at Clifford Castle
Clifford Castle
in Herefordshire. The first Baron served as Earl Marshal of England
England
but was killed at the Battle of Bannockburn
Battle of Bannockburn
in 1314
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