HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Classical Music
CLASSICAL MUSIC is art music produced or rooted in the traditions of Western music , including both liturgical (religious) and secular music. While a more accurate term is also used to refer to the period from 1750 to 1820 (the Classical period ), this article is about the broad span of time from roughly the 11th century to the present day, which includes the Classical period and various other periods. The central norms of this tradition became codified between 1550 and 1900, which is known as the common-practice period
[...More...]

"Classical Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pitch (music)
PITCH is a perceptual property of sounds that allows their ordering on a frequency -related scale , or more commonly, pitch is the quality that makes it possible to judge sounds as "higher" and "lower" in the sense associated with musical melodies . Pitch can be determined only in sounds that have a frequency that is clear and stable enough to distinguish from noise . Pitch is a major auditory attribute of musical tones , along with duration , loudness , and timbre . Pitch may be quantified as a frequency , but pitch is not a purely objective physical property; it is a subjective psychoacoustical attribute of sound. Historically, the study of pitch and pitch perception has been a central problem in psychoacoustics, and has been instrumental in forming and testing theories of sound representation, processing, and perception in the auditory system
[...More...]

"Pitch (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

High Modernism
HIGH MODERNISM (also known as "HIGH MODERNITY") is a form of modernity , characterized by an unfaltering confidence in science and technology as means to reorder the social and natural world. The high modernist movement was particularly prevalent during the Cold War
Cold War
, especially in the late 1950s and 1960s
[...More...]

"High Modernism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aram Khachaturian
ARAM IL\'YICH KHACHATURIAN (/ˈærəm ˌkɑːtʃəˈtʊəriən/ ; Russian : Ара́м Ильи́ч Хачатуря́н; Armenian : Արամ Խաչատրյան, Aram Xačatryan; Armenian pronunciation: ; 6 June 1903 – 1 May 1978) was a Soviet Armenian composer and conductor. He is considered one of the leading Soviet composers . Born and raised in Tbilisi , the multicultural capital of Georgia , Khachaturian moved to Moscow
Moscow
in 1921 following the Sovietization of the Caucasus
Caucasus
. Without prior music training, he enrolled in the Gnessin Musical Institute , subsequently studying at the Moscow Conservatory in the class of Nikolai Myaskovsky
Nikolai Myaskovsky
, among others. His first major work, the Piano Concerto (1936), popularized his name within and outside the Soviet Union. It was followed by the Violin Concerto (1940) and the Cello Concerto (1946)
[...More...]

"Aram Khachaturian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

George Gershwin
GEORGE JACOB GERSHWIN (/ˈɡɜːrʃ.wɪn/ ; September 26, 1898 – July 11, 1937) was an American composer and pianist . Gershwin's compositions spanned both popular and classical genres, and his most popular melodies are widely known. Among his best-known works are the orchestral compositions Rhapsody in Blue (1924) and An American in Paris
Paris
(1928) as well as the opera Porgy and Bess
Porgy and Bess
(1935). Gershwin studied piano under Charles Hambitzer and composition with Rubin Goldmark , Henry Cowell
Henry Cowell
and Joseph Brody. He began his career as a song plugger , but soon started composing Broadway theatre works with his brother Ira Gershwin
Ira Gershwin
and Buddy DeSylva
Buddy DeSylva

[...More...]

"George Gershwin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chord (music)
A CHORD, in music , is any harmonic set of pitches consisting of two or more (usually three or more) notes (also called "pitches") that are heard as if sounding simultaneously . (For many practical and theoretical purposes, arpeggios and broken chords, or sequences of chord tones , may also be considered as chords.) Chords and sequences of chords are frequently used in modern West African and Oceanic music, Western classical music, and Western popular music ; yet, they are absent from the music of many other parts of the world. In tonal Western classical music (music with a tonic key or "home key"), the most frequently encountered chords are triads, so called because they consist of three distinct notes: the root note, and Intervals of a third and a fifth above the root note. Other chords with more than three notes include added tone chords , extended chords and tone clusters , which are used in contemporary classical music , jazz and other genres
[...More...]

"Chord (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Experimental Music
EXPERIMENTAL MUSIC is a general label for any music that pushes existing boundaries and genre definitions (Anon. & n.d.(c) ). Experimental compositional practice is defined broadly by exploratory sensibilites radically opposed to, and questioning of, institutionalized compositional, performing, and aesthetic conventions in music (Sun 2013 ). Elements of experimental music include indeterminate music , in which the composer introduces the elements of chance or unpredictability with regard to either the composition or its performance. Artists may also approach a hybrid of disparate styles or incoprorate unorthodox and unique elements (Anon. literally, "concrete music"), is a form of electroacoustic music that utilises acousmatic sound as a compositional resource
[...More...]

"Experimental Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Metre (music)
In music, METRE (Am. METER) refers to the regularly recurring patterns and accents such as measures and beats . Unlike rhythm, metric onsets are not necessarily sounded, but are nevertheless expected by the listener. A variety of systems exist throughout the world for organising and playing metrical music, such as the Indian system of tala and similar systems in Arabian and African music . Western music inherited the concept of metre from poetry (Scholes 1977 ; Latham 2002b ) where it denotes: the number of lines in a verse ; the number of syllables in each line; and the arrangement of those syllables as long or short, accented or unaccented (Scholes 1977 ; Latham 2002b ). The first coherent system of rhythmic notation in modern Western music was based on rhythmic modes derived from the basic types of metrical unit in the quantitative meter of classical ancient Greek and Latin poetry (Hoppin 1978 , 221)
[...More...]

"Metre (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ad Libitum
AD LIBITUM (/ædˈlɪbɪtəm/ ) is Latin
Latin
for "at one's pleasure" or "as you desire"; it is often shortened to "AD LIB" (as an adjective or adverb ) or "ad-lib" (as a verb or noun ). The roughly synonymous phrase a bene placito ("in accordance with good pleasure") is less common but, in its Italian form a piacere , entered the musical lingua franca (see below). The phrase "at liberty" is often associated mnemonically (because of the alliteration of the lib- syllable), although it is not the translation (there is no cognation between libitum and liber). Libido is the etymologically closer cognate known in English
[...More...]

"Ad Libitum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Modernism (music)
In music , MODERNISM is a philosophical and aesthetic stance underlying the period of change and development in musical language that occurred around the turn of the 20th century, a period of diverse reactions in challenging and reinterpreting older categories of music, innovations that lead to new ways of organizing and approaching harmonic, melodic, sonic, and rhythmic aspects of music, and changes in aesthetic worldviews in close relation to the larger identifiable period of modernism in the arts of the time. The operative word most associated with it is "innovation" (Metzer 2009 , 3). Its leading feature is a "linguistic plurality", which is to say that no one music genre ever assumed a dominant position (Morgan 1984 , 443). Inherent within musical modernism is the conviction that music is not a static phenomenon defined by timeless truths and classical principles, but rather something which is intrinsically historical and developmental
[...More...]

"Modernism (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

20th-century Classical Music
20TH-CENTURY CLASSICAL MUSIC describes orchestral works, chamber music, solo instrumental works (including keyboard music), electronic music, choral music, songs, operas, ballets, concertos, symphonies, and related forms, as well as fantasies, rhapsodies, fugues, passacaglias and chaconnes, variations, oratorios, cantatas, suites, improvisational and newly developed formal concepts such as variable and mobile forms, that have been written and performed since 1900. This era was without a dominant style and composers have created highly diverse kinds of music. Modernism
Modernism
, impressionism , post-romanticism , neoclassicism , expressionism , and, later, minimalism were all important movements. Atonality
Atonality
, serialism , musique concrète and electronic music were all developed during this period. Jazz
Jazz
was an important influence on many composers in this period
[...More...]

"20th-century Classical Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Postmodern Music
POSTMODERN MUSIC is either simply music of the postmodern era , or music that follows aesthetical and philosophical trends of postmodernism . As the name suggests, the postmodernist movement formed partly in reaction to modernism . Even so, postmodern music still does not primarily define itself in opposition to modernist music ; this label is applied instead by critics and theorists. Postmodern music is not a distinct musical style, but rather refers to music of the postmodern era. The terms "postmodern", "postmodernism", "postmodernist", and "postmodernity" are exasperating terms (Bertens 1995 , 3). Indeed, postmodernists question the tight definitions and categories of academic disciplines, which they regard simply as the remnants of modernity (Rosenau 1992 , 6–7)
[...More...]

"Postmodern Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward Elgar
SIR EDWARD WILLIAM ELGAR, 1ST BARONET OM GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English composer, many of whose works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire. Among his best-known compositions are orchestral works including the Enigma Variations , the Pomp and Circumstance Marches , concertos for violin and cello , and two symphonies . He also composed choral works, including The Dream of Gerontius , chamber music and songs. He was appointed Master of the King\'s Musick in 1924. Although Elgar is often regarded as a typically English composer, most of his musical influences were not from England but from continental Europe. He felt himself to be an outsider, not only musically, but socially
[...More...]

"Edward Elgar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhythm
RHYTHM (from Greek ῥυθμός, rhythmos, "any regular recurring motion, symmetry " (Liddell and Scott 1996 )) generally means a "movement marked by the regulated succession of strong and weak elements, or of opposite or different conditions" (Anon. 1971 , 2537). This general meaning of regular recurrence or pattern in time can apply to a wide variety of cyclical natural phenomena having a periodicity or frequency of anything from microseconds to several seconds (as with the riff in a rock music song ); to several minutes or hours, or, at the most extreme, even over many years. In the performance arts , rhythm is the timing of events on a human scale; of musical sounds and silences that occur over time, of the steps of a dance , or the meter of spoken language and poetry . In some performing arts, such as hip hop music , the rhythmic delivery of the lyrics is one of the most important elements of the style
[...More...]

"Rhythm" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sergei Rachmaninoff
SERGEI VASILIEVICH RACHMANINOFF (Russian : Серге́й Васи́льевич Рахма́нинов, tr. Sergéj Vasíl'evič Rahmáninov; IPA: ; 1 April 1873 – 28 March 1943) was a Russian virtuoso pianist, composer, and conductor of the late-Romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular in the romantic repertoire. Born into a musical family, Rachmaninoff took up the piano at age four. He graduated from the Moscow Conservatory in 1892 and had composed several piano and orchestral pieces by this time. In 1897, following the critical reaction to his Symphony
Symphony
No. 1 , Rachmaninoff entered a four-year depression and composed little until successful therapy allowed him to complete his enthusiastically received Piano Concerto No. 2 in 1901
[...More...]

"Sergei Rachmaninoff" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Religious Music
RELIGIOUS MUSIC (also SACRED MUSIC) is music performed or composed for religious use or through religious influence. RITUAL MUSIC is music, sacred or not, performed or composed for or as ritual . CONTENTS * 1 Christian music * 2 Hindu music
Hindu music
* 3 Sikh music * 4 Jewish music * 5 Islamic music * 6 Rastafarian music * 7 Shintō music * 8 Buddhist music * 9 Zoroastrian music * 10 See also * 11 References * 12 Further reading * 13 External links CHRISTIAN MUSIC Main articles: Church music and Christian music According to some scholars, the earliest music in the Christian Church came from Jewish worship music, with some additional Syriac influence. It is believed that this music lay somewhere between singing and speaking, or speaking with an understood ritual cadence
[...More...]

"Religious Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.