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Classical Antiquity
Classical antiquity
Classical antiquity
(also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa
North Africa
and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer
Homer
(8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity
Christianity
and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD)
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Epic Greek
Homeric Greek is the form of the Greek language that was used by Homer in the Iliad and Odyssey and in the Homeric Hymns. It is a literary dialect of Ancient Greek consisting mainly of Ionic and Aeolic, with a few forms from Arcadocypriot and non-Greek languages, and a written form influenced by Attic.[1] It was later named Epic Greek because it was used as the language of epic poetry, typically in dactylic hexameter, by poets such as Hesiod and Theognis of Megara. Compositions in Epic Greek may date from as late as the 3rd century AD, though its decline was inevitable with the rise of Koine Greek.Contents1 Main features1.1 Phonology 1.2 Nouns 1.3 Pronouns 1.4 Verbs 1.5 Adverbs 1.6 Particles 1.7 Other features2 Vocabulary 3 Sample 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksMain features[edit] In the following description, only forms that differ from those of later Greek are discussed
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History Of East Asia
The history of East Asia covers the people inhabiting the eastern subregion of the Asian continent known as East Asia from prehistoric times to the present. The region has been well known for the ancient civilizations of China, Japan, Korea, and Taiwan which flourished throughout the region and continued until present day. Many belief systems or religions evolved, flourished or spread in East Asia which includes Confucianism, Buddhism, Taoism and Islam. Prehistorically China was under the regime of Xia, Shang and Zhou dynasties followed by, historically Qing and Han dynasties. For a long period in prehistory and known history, these three regions had their own style of inter-regional politics, culture and trades, which was relatively less affected by outside world
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History Of Writing
The history of writing traces the development of expressing language by letters or other marks[1] and also the studies and descriptions of these developments. In the history of how systems of representation of language through graphic means have evolved in different human civilizations, more complete writing systems were preceded by proto-writing, systems of ideographic or early mnemonic symbols. True writing, in which the content of a linguistic utterance is encoded so that another reader can reconstruct, with a fair degree of accuracy, the exact utterance written down, is a later development. It is distinguished from proto-writing, which typically avoids encoding grammatical words and affixes, making it more difficult or impossible to reconstruct the exact meaning intended by the writer unless a great deal of context is already known in advance
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North Africa
North Africa
Africa
is a collective term for a group of Mediterranean countries situated in the northern-most region of the African continent. The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic
Atlantic
shores of Morocco
Morocco
in the west, to the Suez Canal
Suez Canal
and the Red Sea
Red Sea
in the east. Others have limited it to the countries of Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, a region known by the French during colonial times as “Afrique du Nord” and by the Arabs
Arabs
as the Maghreb
Maghreb
(“West”). The most commonly accepted definition includes Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia, as well as Libya
Libya
and Egypt
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History Of Oceania
The History of Oceania includes the history of Australia, New Zealand, Papua New Guinea, Fiji and other Pacific island nations.Contents1 Prehistory1.1 Polynesia theories 1.2 Micronesia theories 1.3 Melanesia theories 1.4 Australasia theories2 European contact and exploration (1500s–1700s)2.1 Iberian pioneers2.1.1 Early Iberian exploration 2.1.2 Other large expeditions2.2 Oceania during the Golden Age of Dutch exploration and discovery2.2.1 Early Dutch exploration 2.2.2 Abel Tasman's exploratory voyages2.3 British exploration and Captain James Cook's voyages2.3.1 First voyage (1768–71) 2.3.2 Second voyage (1772–75) 2.3.3 Third voyage (1776–79)3 Colonization3.1 British colonization 3.2 French colonization 3.3 Spanish colonization 3.4 Dutch colonization 3.5 German colonization 3.6 American colonization 3.7 Japanese colonization4 Samoan Crisis 1887–1889 5 World War I 6 World War II6.
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History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
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Neoclassicism (music)
Neoclassicism in music was a twentieth-century trend, particularly current in the interwar period, in which composers sought to return to aesthetic precepts associated with the broadly defined concept of "classicism", namely order, balance, clarity, economy, and emotional restraint. As such, neoclassicism was a reaction against the unrestrained emotionalism and perceived formlessness of late Romanticism, as well as a "call to order" after the experimental ferment of the first two decades of the twentieth century
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Neoclassical Economics
Neoclassical economics
Neoclassical economics
is an approach to economics focusing on the determination of goods, outputs, and income distributions in markets through supply and demand
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Origins Of Christianity
Early Christianity
Early Christianity
has its roots in the Hellenistic culture
Hellenistic culture
of the first century. It was, just like Early Rabbinical Judaism, significantly influenced by Hellenistic religion
Hellenistic religion
and Hellenistic philosophy. The influence of Neoplatonism
Neoplatonism
on Christian theology
Christian theology
is significant, visible for example in Augustine of Hippo's identification of God as summum bonum and of evil as privatio boni.Without the power of the orthodox Church and the Rabbis
Rabbis
to declare people heretics and outside the system it remained impossible to declare phenomenologically who was a Jew
Jew
and who was a Christian. At least as interesting and significant, it seems more and more clear that it is frequently impossible to tell a Jewish text from a Christian text
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Classical Physics
Classical physics
Classical physics
refers to theories of physics that predate modern, more complete, or more widely applicable theories. If a currently accepted theory is considered to be "modern," and its introduction represented a major paradigm shift, then the previous theories, or new theories based on the older paradigm, will often be referred to as belonging to the realm of "classical" physics.[citation needed] As such, the definition of a classical theory depends on context. Classical physical concepts are often used when modern theories are unnecessarily complex for a particular situation
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Classical Economics
Classical economics
Classical economics
or classical political economy (also known as liberal economics) is a school of thought in economics that flourished, primarily in Britain, in the late 18th and early-to-mid 19th century. Its main thinkers are held to be Adam Smith, Jean-Baptiste Say, David Ricardo, Thomas Robert Malthus, and John Stuart Mill. These economists produced a theory of market economies as largely self-regulating systems, governed by natural laws of production and exchange (famously captured by Adam Smith's metaphor of the invisible hand). Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations
The Wealth of Nations
in 1776 is usually considered to mark the beginning of classical economics.[1] The fundamental message in Smith's book was that the wealth of any nation was determined not by the gold in the monarch's coffers, but by its national income
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Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
Edgar Allan Poe
(/poʊ/; born Edgar Poe; January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre. He is widely regarded as a central figure of Romanticism
Romanticism
in the United States and American literature as a whole, and he was one of the country's earliest practitioners of the short story. Poe is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre and is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction.[1] He was the first well-known American writer to try to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career.[2] Poe was born in Boston, the second child of two actors
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Culture
Culture
Culture
(/ˈkʌltʃər/) is the social behavior and norms found in human societies. Culture
Culture
is considered a central concept in anthropology, encompassing the range of phenomena that are transmitted through social learning in human societies. Some aspects of human behavior, social practices such as culture, expressive forms such as art, music, dance, ritual, religion, and technologies such as tool usage, cooking, shelter, and clothing are said to be cultural universals, found in all human societies
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Futures Studies
Futures studies
Futures studies
(also called futurology) is the study of postulating possible, probable, and preferable futures and the worldviews and myths that underlie them. In general, it can be considered as a branch of the social sciences and parallel to the field of history. Futures studies (colloquially called "futures" by many of the field's practitioners) seeks to understand what is likely to continue and what could plausibly change. Part of the discipline thus seeks a systematic and pattern-based understanding of past and present, and to determine the likelihood of future events and trends.[1] Unlike the physical sciences where a narrower, more specified system is studied, futures studies concerns a much bigger and more complex world system. The methodology and knowledge are much less proven as compared to natural science or even social science like sociology and economics
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Parthenon
Coordinates: 37°58′17″N 23°43′35″E / 37.9714°N 23.7265°E / 37.9714; 23.7265ParthenonΠαρθενώναςThe ParthenonGeneral informationType TempleArchitectural style ClassicalLocation Athens, GreeceConstruction started 447 BC[1][2]Completed 432 BC[1][2]Destroyed Partially on 26 September 1687Height 13.72 m (45.0 ft)[3]DimensionsOther dimensions Cella: 29.8 by 19.2 m (98 by 63 ft)Technical detailsSize 69.5 by 30.9 m (228 by 101 ft)Design and constructionArchitect Iktinos, CallicratesOther designers Phidias
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