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City Of Brussels
The City of Brussels
Brussels
(French: Ville de Bruxelles [vil də bʁysɛl] or alternatively Bruxelles-Ville [bʁysɛl vil], Dutch: Stad Brussel [stɑd ˈbrɵsəl][2] or Brussel-Stad) is the largest municipality and historical centre of the Brussels-Capital Region, and the de jure capital of Belgium.[3] Besides the strict centre, it also covers the immediate northern outskirts where it borders municipalities in Flanders
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Annexation
Annexation
Annexation
( Latin
Latin
ad, to, and nexus, joining) is the administrative action[1] and concept in international law relating to the forcible transition of one state's territory by a
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Telephone Numbers In Belgium
A telephone number in Belgium
Belgium
is a sequence of nine or ten digits dialed on a telephone to make a call on the Belgian telephone network. Belgium
Belgium
is under a closed telephone dialing plan, meaning that the full national number must be dialed for all calls, but it retains the trunk code, '0', for all national dialling. Exception: Some "special services" use 3 or 4 digits with no area or trunk codes: e.g.; 112 and 100 (fire brigade and ambulance); 101 (police); 1307 (info in French) or 1207 (info in Dutch), etc. "112" is an emergency number for contacting the fire brigade, ambulance and police in all 28 countries of the European Union. Operators will help you in the native language, in English, or the language of any neighbouring country
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Aesculus Hippocastanum
Aesculus
Aesculus
hippocastanum is a species of flowering plant in the soapberry and lychee family Sapindaceae. It is a large deciduous, synoecious [1] (hermaphroditic-flowered) tree, commonly known as horse-chestnut[2] or conker tree.Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Uses 5 Medical uses5.1 Safety in medical use6 Other chemicals 7 Anne Frank Tree 8 Bonsai 9 Diseases 10 Gallery 11 See also 12 References 13 External linksDescription[edit] Aesculus
Aesculus
hippocastanum is a large tree, growing to about 39 metres (128 ft) tall[3]:371 with a domed crown of stout branches; on old trees the outer branches often pendulous with curled-up tips. The leaves are opposite and palmately compound, with 5–7 leaflets; each leaflet is 13–30 cm long, making the whole leaf up to 60 cm across, with a 7–20 cm petiole
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Zenne
The Zenne (Dutch: [ˈzɛnə]) or Senne (French: [sɛn]) is a small river that flows through Brussels, left tributary of the Dijle/Dyle. Its source is in the village of Naast near the municipality of Soignies. It is an indirect tributary of the Scheldt, through the Dijle and the Rupel. It joins the Dijle at Zennegat, in Battel in the north of the municipality of Mechelen, only a few hundred metres before the Dijle itself joins the Rupel. The Woluwe is one of the tributaries of the Zenne. In total the Zenne is 103 kilometres (64 mi) long. In the centre of Brussels, the Zenne was completely covered up and major boulevards were built over top in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It is still visible in the outskirts of Brussels and outside the city, though within the city it now runs mostly underneath the small ring
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Multilingualism
Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is the use of more than one language, either by an individual speaker or by a community of speakers. It is believed that multilingual speakers outnumber monolingual speakers in the world's population.[1] More than half of all Europeans
Europeans
claim to speak at least one language other than their mother tongue;[2] nevertheless, many of these are monoscriptual. Multilingualism
Multilingualism
is becoming a social phenomenon governed by the needs of globalization and cultural openness.[3] Owing to the ease of access to information facilitated by the Internet, individuals' exposure to multiple languages is becoming increasingly frequent, thereby promoting a need to acquire additional languages. People who speak several languages are also called polyglots.[4] Multilingual speakers have acquired and maintained at least one language during childhood, the so-called first language (L1)
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Population Density
Population
Population
density (in agriculture: standing stock and standing crop) is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term.[1]Contents1 Biological population densities1.1 By political boundaries 1.2 Other methods of measurement2 See also2.1 Lists of entities by population density3 References 4 External linksBiological population densities[edit] Population
Population
density is population divided by total land area or water volume, as appropriate.[1] Low densities may cause an extinction vortex and lead to further reduced fertility. This is called the Allee effect
Allee effect
after the scientist who identified it
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Romanesque Architecture
Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is an architectural style of medieval Europe characterized by semi-circular arches. There is no consensus for the beginning date of the Romanesque style, with proposals ranging from the 6th to the 11th century, this later date being the most commonly held. It developed in the 12th century into the Gothic style, marked by pointed arches. Examples of Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
can be found across the continent, making it the first pan-European architectural style since Imperial Roman architecture. The Romanesque style in England is traditionally referred to as Norman architecture. Combining features of ancient Roman and Byzantine buildings and other local traditions, Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
is known by its massive quality, thick walls, round arches, sturdy pillars, barrel vaults, large towers and decorative arcading
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French Language
French (le français [lə fʁɑ̃sɛ] ( listen) or la langue française [la lɑ̃ɡ fʁɑ̃sɛz]) is a Romance language
Romance language
of the Indo-European family. It descended from the Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
of the Roman Empire, as did all Romance languages. French has evolved from Gallo-Romance, the spoken Latin
Latin
in Gaul, and more specifically in Northern Gaul. Its closest relatives are the other langues d'oïl—languages historically spoken in northern France
France
and in southern Belgium, which French (Francien) has largely supplanted. French was also influenced by native Celtic languages
Celtic languages
of Northern Roman Gaul
Gaul
like Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
and by the (Germanic) Frankish language of the post-Roman Frankish invaders
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Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert
The Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert
Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert
(French) or Koninklijke Sint-Hubertusgalerijen (Dutch) is a glazed shopping arcade in Brussels that preceded other famous 19th-century shopping arcades such as the Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
in Milan
Milan
and The Passage in St Petersburg
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European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe. It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi), and an estimated population of over 510 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states
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Santiago De Compostela
Santiago de Compostela,[a], is the capital of the autonomous community of Galicia in northwestern Spain. The city has its origin in the shrine of Saint James the Great, now the city's cathedral, as destination of the Way of St. James, a leading Catholic pilgrimage route originated in the 9th century[1]. In 1985 the city's Old Town was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site.Contents1 Toponym 2 The city2.1 Climate3 Administration3.1 2015 city council elections results4 Population 5 History 6 Economy 7 Way of St. James7.1 Legends 7.2 Establishment of the shrine 7.3 Pre-Christian legends 7.4 In popular culture8 Main sights 9 Transport 10 Notable people10.1 sport11 International relations11.1 Twin towns/Sister cities12 See also 13 Notes 14 References 15 Bibliography 16 External linksToponym[edit] Santiago is the local Galician evolution of Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
Sanctus Iacobus "Saint James"
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Capital City
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
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De Jure
In law and government, de jure (/deɪ ˈdʒʊərɪ/ or /dɪ ˈdʒʊərɪ/; Latin: de iure, lit. 'in law' Latin pronunciation: [deː juːre]) describes practices that are legally recognised, whether or not the practices exist in reality.[1] In contrast, de facto ("in fact" or "in practice") describes situations that exist in reality, even if not legally recognised.[2] The terms are often used to contrast different scenarios: for a colloquial example, "I know that, de jure, this is supposed to be a parking lot, but now that the flood has left four feet of water here, it's a de facto swimming pool".[3] Examples[edit] It is possible to have multiple simultaneous conflicting (de jure) legalities, possibly none of which is in force (de facto). After seizing power in 1526, Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
Ahmad ibn Ibrahim al-Ghazi
made his brother, Umar Din, the lawful (de jure) Sultan
Sultan
of Adal
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Municipality
A municipality is usually a single urban or administrative division having corporate status and powers of self-government or jurisdiction as granted by national and state laws to which it is subordinate
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City Centre
A city centre (or city center) is the commercial, cultural and often the historical, political and geographic heart of a city, especially those in the Western world. The term "city centre" is primarily used in British English. In North America, the term downtown is used.Contents1 Overview and related concepts 2 Usage2.1 Australia 2.2 China 2.3 Netherlands3 See alsoOverview and related concepts[edit] The city centre is the (often historical) area of a city where commerce, entertainment, shopping and political power are concentrated. The term is commonly used in many English-speaking countries and has direct equivalents in many other languages. However, noticeably, in the United States, the term "downtown" is commonly used to denote a city centre, and in Canada
Canada
the terms "city centre" and "downtown" are used interchangeably
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